The Easy Readable Version of the Journal by Craig Showalter

Ship Merrimac of New London

[A personal journal by a member of the crew: Frederick Olney, who served as Third Mate]

Sailed Wednesday, July 17, 1844

Made sail at 6 o'clock in the morning, with fine weather but no wind. At 8 o'clock the Steam Boat Thorn took us in tow and took us outside of the light house where we got a breeze. At 9 o'clock the Pilot left us off Montauk. Saw the bark Congress. Going in course SE the wind SW with a fine breeze.

Thursday, July 18, 1844

Fine light weather and sometimes calm. Saw two sails. The night, foggy. Some of our boys seasick. Employed fitting our boats.

Friday, July 19, 1844

Today it is beautiful weather. Several sail in light. Steered SE by E.

Saturday, July 20, 1844

Today continues fine weather and a steady breeze at SW and we steered E.

Sunday, July 21, 1844

Today is unsettled. Thunder, lightning, and rain squalls with a good breeze at south, and we are going along at the rate of six knots. All hands are well except one or two seasick a little. Saw a ship astern.

Monday, July 22, 1844

This day continues fine, light weather with a light breeze at NE and pleasant. Saw the Venice to the SW. 

Tuesday, July 23, 1844

Is light and calm weather. The ship seen on Sunday afternoon astern proved to be the Venice with Capt. Lester. She passed us last night and today is 5 miles off, bearing NNE. Monday and Tuesday we lowered our boats to drill. The men are quite handy at their oars. A sail in sight on our lee quarter. 

Wednesday, July 24, 1844

Good weather and a five knot breeze from SW. Steered ESE. A ship passed across our bow last night at 12 o'clock, steering about E by N. The Venice is just in sight and on our lee quarter about 8 miles off. 

Thursday, July 25, 1844

The weather [missing section of page] at with a light breeze from the NE. 

Friday, July 26, 1844

Today the weather is raining [missing section of page] from E to ESE continued on the [missing section of page] to the SSE. I saw a ship supposed ... [missing section of page]

Saturday, July 27, 1844

Steered ESE with a fair wind from about SW and a strong breeze.

Sunday, July 28, 1844

Fine weather and a gentle breeze at West. All hands are well.

Monday, July 29, 1844

Continued pleasant weather with a light breeze. Saw two sail, one steering to the westward.

Tuesday, July 30, 1844

Very fine light weather with a light breeze at about South. One ship to the southward, and a Brig to the north of us steering to the eastward and the ship to the westward.

Wednesday, July 31, 1844

Today is very fine and quite warm with a light breeze to the SSE. Steered E & ENE. For several days past, we have seen some Grampus whales and lowered for them. But see them no more after our boats were in the water.

Thursday, August 1, 1844

Going on nicely with a light breeze to the SW. Saw several sail, apparently bound to Europe.

Friday, August 2, 1844

Continued pleasant with a gentle breeze from the West. Continued our course SSE.

Saturday, August 3, 1844

Passed between Corvo and Flores, with a whole sail breeze at SW. Steered SSE. Saw a large ship laying aback under Flores. At 6 o’clock, were near Fayall. Reefed topsails for the first time since leaving New London, and stood off to the South, with squalls of rain.

Sunday, August 4, 1844

Ran in betwix Fayall and Pico. Blowing strong, with rain in squalls in the afternoon. Moderate and pleasant, our boat lands and gets some refreshment. The wind shifts to the Northeast and we run to the South side of Fayall and lay off all night.

Monday, August 5, 1844

Beat in [to make progress windward by sailing in a zigzag line by tacking or wearing], and the captain goes on shore. In the afternoon, loaded off 220 bushels of potatoes, 20,000 onions, 40 dozen eggs, cucumbers, cabbage, grapes, etc. Captain returns on board at 5 o'clock PM. There are six ships and barques here and in light besides ours. One of which is the Venice. Capt. Lester arrived at 6 o'clock in the evening. Capt. Lester comes down and [missing section of page] us and came on board. From here I send [missing section of page] letters: one to Mother, one to brother, and one to [unclear] [missing section of page] Olive, one to Sister Sarah. At 9 o'clock PM [missing section of page] and steered our course for the South Atlantic [missing section of page] breeze from the N & E. Here again I have to record some of the evils of drunkenness. Some of our men obtained liquor from the shore and were very ugly, and had to be used very rough in order to preserve obedience. How much better would it be for them and for us were they consistent teetotalers. 

Tuesday, August 6, 1844

Today is fine weather and we are out of sight of the Islands and going along with a gentle breeze at ESE & SE about 5 knots.

Wednesday, August 7, 1844

We are driving along at a fine rate with a steady breeze at about ESE and fine weather.

Thursday, August 8, 1844

Continues the same as Wednesday (yesterday). A sail in sight.

Friday August 9, 1844

Continued fine weather and a steady breeze at ESE. Course South. We have been busily employed since leaving Fayall in stowing away our recruits. One sail in sight steering Southward and Westward.

Saturday, August 10, 1844 

Today is beautifully fine and we are coursing on our way at a rapid rate, making nearly 200 miles each 24 hours distance. Latitude 27˚ 30’

Sunday, August 11, 1844 

Another Lord's day has dawned upon us. And thanks to his mercy, finds all well and apparently enjoying tolerable good spirits. But poor me, how can I, so far from her I love? But our hearts are united in prayer. I fancy while I write she is at her devotions. Father protect her in mercy and bring us together again in thine own good time. With a fine breeze, we are onward hastening at the rate of eight knots per hour. With studding sails for the first since leaving Fayall. Course South. Latitude (by obs. [by observation]) 24˚ 30’

Monday, August 12, 1844  

Today continued pleasant weather and a fine breeze, and we are coursing along at a fine rate, making about 170 miles southward in 24 hours.

Tuesday, August 13, 1844 

Remains fine, and we drew near the Cape de Verde Island at night. Shorten sail. Expecting to see them before morning. Distant, by our reckoning, 90 miles.

Wednesday, August 14, 1844 

At sunrise had sight of one of the Islands, which proved to be Sal (or, Sall) Island. Passed within ten or fifteen miles of it on the east side. Saw signs of inhabitants, and stood on the South and West.

Thursday, August 15, 1844

At daylight had sight of the Island of St.Jago (or, St. Yago) to the eastward  Kept on to the westward for the Isle of Fogo. Run in close on the west side, and landed with two boats, with the intention of trading away some old bread for pigs, eggs, fowl, fruit, etc. On landing, we found that the people were not much in want of our trade, but wanted money and cloth. They asked two dollars for pigs that would not weigh more than 30 lbs. We soon left that place without getting anything, and got on board the ship, and run down around the Island where we found the town. Sent a boat in just at sunset, which returned in about an hour with word that we could get plenty of pigs, goats, sheep, cattle, fowl, eggs, fine apples, bananas, etc. in exchange for bread, flour, rice, clothes, cloth, shoes, knives, etc. This being so flattering, Capt. Destin concluded to stay until the next day. Accordingly, on...

Friday, August 16, 1844

At daylight in the morning, we found we had drifted out to the southwest from the town about 20 miles. At 7 o’clock in the morning we started with two boats (it being calm at this time), where we found many ready to receive us, but found things different from what we expected, and a great trouble to get anything. We finally got 4 hogs and returned on board at 4 o’clock in the afternoon, and resumed our course South for the Equator.

The natives at these islands are mostly black and mulattoes with but very few white. I should say from what I saw that they were all mixed with colored blood, and I should think led a miserable life. Their houses are comfortable I suppose for the climate. But there is nothing but the walls and ceiling. Furniture, not being fashionable, as I suppose not necessary. Clothing too is not very fashionable as many of the children as old as ten years were entirely naked. There were some few of the gentry such as the collector and priest and the reputed consul that appeared quite well, and some quite pretty girls; if they could be fixed up by our milliners and mantua makers, etc. On the whole, I saw nothing at all enticing to my eye. All disgusting and loathsome.

Saturday, August 17, 1844

Morning. We find ourselves out of sight of this said island of Fogo (or, Fire) for it is said that there is a volcano on it which can be seen in clear weather by ships at sea on the east side. This island is very high and covered with clouds nearly half way during most of the day, but at night quite clear from where we lay, which was between Fogo and Baboa, which is distant about 15 miles to the southward and westward. Being then clear from these islands, we shape our course for the Southern Ocean.

The Jason touched at Fogo on the 11th, and the John and Elizabeth about the same time. Also the Schooner Franklin

Sunday, August 18, 1844

This day continued fine weather, with a light breeze to the eastward. Course South.

Sunday, August 24, 1844

Nothing particular has occurred since leaving the Cape De Verde Islands. The winds have been light and variable with squalls of rain, and mostly from the southward, so that we have made slow progress southward. We have seen several sails, some bound southward, and some northward. Exchanged colors with an English Barque bound to the northward. Today the weather is fine and pleasant, with a gentle whole sail breeze at WSW, and we are steering South, with a Brig in company, with which we have exchanged colors, believed to be English. She is about 5 miles off to leeward of us, and rather out sails us. All hands are well. Latitude today (by obs.) 6˚ 57’ North, Longitude 20˚ 15’ West

Sunday, September 1, 1844

This day is fine, pleasant weather with a steady five knot breeze at South, and we are steering WSW.  During the past week, nothing particular has occurred. The weather has been light and the wind from South to Southwest. And we have made but little progress to the southward. Have seen several sail bound to the southward. One whale ship passed within a mile of us. Name not known. Today our Latitude (by obs.) is 1˚ 50’ North 

Monday, September 2, 1844

Fine weather, and a light breeze at SSE. Steered SW across the Equator at 7 o’clock PM, without seeing old Neptune. Since he has joined the temperance ranks, he does not visit the ships as regular as formally. Latitude at noon 00° 24’ N

Tuesday, September 3, 1844 

Continues fine weather, and a steady breeze at SE. Steered S & SSW. Latitude 1° 37 S.

Wednesday, September 4, 1844

Wind, light and variable, from E to S. Course S. Saw a ship in the morning heading to the northward and westward. Latitude at noon 3° S

Thursday, September 5, 1844

Fine weather and a moderate breeze at SSE. Steered SW. Latitude at noon 5° 00' S

Sunday, September 8, 1844

Strong SE trade winds, and good weather. Steering SSW & SW. Employed mending sails, regardless of the Lord’s Sabbath. Latitude (by obs.) 11° 16' S.

Thursday, September 12, 1844

This morning at 6 o’clock, had sight of the rocks of Martin Vas, near the island of Trindade,  bearing W, distant 15 miles. The weather good, and wind at SE with strong puffs or gusts. Steering SSW, at about 5 knots per hour. All hands well. Latitude yesterday noon 19° 03' S.  Longitude 28° 25' W. Distant from Trindade NNE 90 miles. Latitude of Trindade 21° 28' S Longitude 29° 05’. Latitude of Martin Vas 20° 31' Longitude 28° 38'. Ship’s Latitude at noon today not observed.

Friday, September 13, 1844 

We have been busy today in sending up a new gang of foretopmast rigging. The weather, clear with a good breeze at SE. Course SSW.

Saturday, September 14, 1844 

Fine weather and a steady breeze. Saw for the first, a goose or albatross, and Cape pigeons. We are then out of the Tropics. Latitude (by obs.) 26° 46' S.

Sunday, September 15, 1844

A fine day, with a light breeze at ENE. Course S by W. The nights are getting quite cool. We are a feasting today on fresh pork. Latitude today (by obs.) 28° 18' S.

Called a hog. Pigs. A measly pig. [written vertically on the edge of the page]

Friday, September 20, 1844

Today, we have a strong gale from the westward, and steered SSE. The afternoon, cleared off and pleasant.

Sunday, September 21, 1844

A day of rest is always more or less pleasant. This Sabbath is rendered uncommonly so after a day or two of bad and blowing weather, and, in consequence of, our being now where we expect to see the object of our pursuit. 

Monday, September 22, 1844

Whales are not plenty here by any means. We arrived yesterday morning where we might expect to see some of the species of whale we are after. But up to this time, Monday afternoon, have only seen finbacks (as we call them). But a plenty of birds. We have the wind at SE, and a fair prospect of a gale. At 2 PM, Latitude about 37° S.

Friday, September 27, 1844 

Today is the first moderate day that we have had since last Sunday, it having been a continued gale since that Time. The wind being from NE around eastward to SSW, where it now is. We have been "hove to" a part of the time, and for the last two days, running off E & E by N, which brings us today in the Latitude (by obs.) 34° 37' Longitude 22° 40'. The weather has been cold and heavy, squally with hail. But the Merrimac has weathered it out pretty fair. She is not so good a ship by any means as the North America as a sea boat. Yesterday afternoon, had to take in two of our boats. All hands are well and in fine spirits. We are now running under whole topsails, with a strong breeze at SWW, and steering E up to 2 PM.

Saturday, September 28, 1844

This morning, at about 6 o clock, our ship's company were Suddenly alarmed by the cry of “a man overboard.”  Happily, he was soon recovered by lowering a boat. Our ship was a going at the time about 6 knots. He was a boatsteerer and was washed over while in the act of setting up the jib stay by the Chief Mate’s orders. Breeze strong, and the ship laboring much.

Friday, October 4, 1844

Sunday, Monday, and Tuesday, were blowing and rain with the wind from NE. to SW with a heavy sea, during which time we have strove to the eastward. Wednesday is moderate, and at 12 o’clock we are, by our reckoning, 25 miles from distance from the Tristan Islands to the northward, but cannot see them. Thursday morning is raining with a light breeze from NW and thick. At 1 PM, cleared off with the wind at SW & W, steering  ESE. Since Wednesday noon up to five o’clock this day (Friday), the wind has hauled around today to NNE and now has every appearance of bad weather soon. Thus we have come across one of the great whaling grounds without even seeing the spout of a whale nor a ship. We next look for the Meridian, where we shall be in two or three days. All hands are well.

Saturday, October 5, 1844

Today we are jogging along with a moderate breeze, sometimes SW & S, around to NW & N, with squalls of rain at 4 PM. We are 39 miles west of the Meridian of Greenwich, with a good breeze steering SE. Latitude at noon 37˚ (by obs.). Caught a porpoise.

Sunday, October 6, 1844

Today we have a strong breeze at SW with squalls of light rain and cold. Course ESE. Latitude at noon (by obs.) 37˚ 59’ Longitude 2˚ 30’ East

Friday, October 11, 1844

Since Sunday, the weather has been changeable and the winds variable and moderate, and the weather rather warm. Today we have seen whales for the first time since leaving New London. At sunrise we lowered, and have lowered twice since, but got nothing. The wind moderate at SSE. Steering East. Latitude (by obs.) 35˚ 31’ Longitude 13˚ 38’ 

Saturday, October 12, 1844

Strong breeze at SSE. Steered East. At evening, not far from the Cape of Good Hope. Tacked and stood to the S & W with fresh gale. Saw plenty of whale birds. Latitude at noon 34˚ 32’

Sunday, October 13, 1844 

Continues fresh gale SSE, and headed westward under easy sail. At evening, the wind hauls eastward. Steered southerly, with fine weather. Latitude at noon 35˚ 24’

Monday, October 14, 1844

At sunrise, were in the midst of black fish. Caught 3. The wind light, and hauls around to the westward, and fine and pleasant. Saw plenty of finback whale. Steering SE. Latitude at noon 36˚ 15’ Longitude 14˚ 25’ East

Tuesday, October 15, 1844 

Fine, pleasant weather and a steady breeze at about SW. Steering SE. At 8 this morning, saw a sail nearly ahead of us, steering about ESE. Saw her about 4 PM on our starboard bearing.

Wednesday, October 16, 1844 

Strong breeze at S & SSE at night with strong squalls.

Thursday, October 17, 1844 

Fresh gale at SSE, and squally, under easy sail. Steering eastward.

Sunday, October 20, 1844 

Today is fine weather and a steady breeze up to 4 PM from NW. Steered East since yesterday afternoon at 6 o’clock. All are well, but no whales. Latitude at noon 36˚ 33’ Longitude 27˚ 26’

Sunday, October 27, 1844 

Today commences with a strong gale, so that we are turning before it under double reefed fore and main top sails and foresail, with the mizzen furled. Steering East, with a clear sunshine. Through the past week the winds have been variable and mostly eastward, so that we have made slow progress to the eastward. But we have a prospect now of a good run on our long road through this immense Ocean called Indian. We have now one man I consider dangerously ill with a sore mouth and throat, with ulcers breaking out on the neck and face. What it is, none of us know. The prevailing opinion is that it is a remnant or a relapse of a disease which he has been using mercury for for some two months since. I am fearful it will prove serious for him. Latitude 36˚ 43’ Longitude

Sunday, November 3, 1844

Today we have fine weather with a moderate breeze at about S & SSW. Steering SE & SSE. The past week has been mostly very fine and light weather, and sometimes calm. Otherwise, with light breezes from the northward and warm. Friday night, we had a sudden shift of wind with squalls and rain from north around westward to south, and cold, which brought us down to close-reefed topsails on Saturday. But it is now quite moderate and we are going along finely under all sail. Latitude at noon 35˚ 25‘ Longitude 56˚ 27‘ East at 2 PM.

Monday, November 4, 1844

This commences beautiful indeed.  I scarce ever saw a more beautiful morning with a light breeze at about West, and steering SE. At 8 o'clock got sight of a whale. At 9 o'clock lowered three boats. But after trying until eleven o'clock, gave up the chase and kept on our course with any quantity of finbacks in sight. The wind hauls to SSW. Latitude at noon 36˚ 03’

Sunday, November 10, 1844

The week past has been remarkably fine and mild, nothing unusual having occurred with us.  On Wednesday had a lunar observation and found it to agree with the chronometer into about 30 minutes in Longitude. Today with a fine breeze at NNE, we are tripping along at the rate of about 6 knots. Steering E by S with plenty of finbacks in sight. At 6 o'clock PM the man to the masthead “discried” a sail the first since we passed the Cape of Good Hope.  Latitude at noon 38˚ 57‘  Longitude 73˚ at 3 o'clock.   

Tuesday, November 12, 1844

The weather is quite fine today after a rather stormy night, and the wind has backed around to NW. At 7 o’clock under all sail. At 7½ o'clock, got sight of the Island of St. Pauls, bearing ENE, distant 15 miles. At 12 o'clock, closed in. Saw a boat fishing which proved to belong to a vessel at anchor on the East side belonging to the Isle of France. Three of our boats went in to fish, but returned at three with only about 60 fish in all. They were not able to fish because of the winds blowing too strong. At 4 o’clock, bore up before a fine breeze at WNW and steered ESE. St. Pauls is in sight. Latitude 38˚ 47’  Longitude 77˚ 52’ East

Wednesday, November 13, 1844 

Saw a ship off our starboard quarter, steering about East, with royals and studding sails set and gaining upon us fast. We were steering ESE. At sunset, steered East. On Tuesday, she was a head of us having passed us to leeward, northward 15 miles with a strong breeze, a westward.

Sunday, November 17, 1844 

Fine weather and a steady breeze at southwest. Course ESE. At 8 o’clock. P.M. got a lunar observation by the planet Saturn and the moon, which made our Longitude 94˚ 56¼’ East, Latitude 38˚ 00’ South

[Ink image of a whale’s tail.] 

Thursday, November 21, 1844

Light wind and a very thick fog. At 40 minutes past 11 o'clock, saw 2 whales. At ¼ past 12 o’clock, lowered 3 boats. And the Chief Mate soon struck, and the whale run about 3 miles with him to windward. And the other 3 boats in chase, and before any of them could get fast, the iron broke and away he went. They came on board, and we kept off our course ESE at 2 o'clock P.M., at which time it again set in foggy. Latitude at noon 40˚ 28’ Longitude about 105˚ 

Sunday, November 24, 1844

With a fine breeze at North, but foggy. No whales, but finbacks. We are now on the coast of Australia or New Holland, consequently, directly opposite of our homes in America. We are of course as far from our friends as we can get, and now begin to advance toward each other. Far off is the day on which we shall meet. Onward is the watchword, and crave heaven's blessing. Course ESE. Latitude at noon 40˚ 23’ South, Longitude at 2 PM 115˚ 03½’ East 

[Ink image of a whale’s tail.] 

Thursday, December 1, 1844 Thanksgiving

Thursday last was supposed to be Thanksgiving day at home. And our share of their annual feast consisted in the reflections of the occasion, But the day did bring forth something unusual for us. For at early dawn, say not past 4 o’clock, we saw 2 right whales about 2 miles distant. A sight so rare that it really caused a spontaneous burst of thanks. Our boats (3) were soon down and in the chase and soon (2) were fast to two whales. And as soon, as it were, a flying away to the windward. And in about a half hour, killed him. But to our mortification, he sank. And the other one, we had cut from in order to clear the lines which had got crossed while the whales were running. At 6 o’clock, our boats were again on the cranes, and we on our course East without our Thanksgiving dinner in cutting a whale.This is the second whale that we have been fast to, and the first one killed. At 12 o’clock, we ate our duff and salt beef. And I turned in to dream of my Olive and pumpkin pies. The weather has been fine until Friday when the wind canted to the South and was cold. Today, it has got around to East and has the appearance of a storm, although our barometer denotes fair weather. All hands are well, except 4. One broken shin, caused at skylarking (Royal Kimball). One cut off thumb with the broad hatchet (the Cooper). One cut off the end of a finger with the chime of a barrel [the edge of the barrel formed by the projecting ends of the staves] (Walter Sacket). And, one sick man,caused by imprudent habits previous to leaving home. I have before mentioned this case and thought it doubtful about his recovery. But since, he has partially recovered. In consequence of these ailings among our crew, we are only able to man three boats. As it has been so far with us, we could have done quite as well with one, for we have only seen whales four times since we have been out. Latitude (by obs.) at noon 38˚ 20’ South, Longitude at 2 PM 134˚ East

Sunday, December 8, 1844

The past week we have had the wind mostly from the N & E with thick, hazy weather. Have seen a great number of finback. Yesterday morning, saw a large sperm whale. Blew strong at the time from the westward, and looked so much like a coming gale that we did not lower our boats. Steered E & ESE. This day is quite moderate with a light breeze at South. Course of E by S. Latitude at noon 47˚ 27’ Longitude 154˚ 11’ East

Sunday, December 15, 1844

Today is moderate, with a breeze at N and westerly, and cold and cloudy. The past week has been cold with the wind varying from SW to SE & E & NE & to N. Wednesday, saw the Snares and Night Islands early in the morning, bearing NW, distant 20 miles. In the afternoon, saw Stewart Island, bearing N 20 miles. Steering NE, saw a reef ahead. Tacked ship and stood SSE, the wind strong at East with a raw, cold atmosphere. Latitude at noon today 50˚ 19’ Longitude about 17˚ 38’ East

Sunday, December 22, 1844

On Monday last, saw two right whales. They were going so fast that we could not come up with them. Took in sail at night and laid too, in the latitude of 48 South. The next day, Tuesday, in the afternoon at 2 o’clock, saw Bounty Island. And at 4 o’clock, Capt Destin and our second officer went on shore, and returned at half past seven with nine very large fur seals and three small ones. One suckling pup we have kept until today. Bounty Island lies in the Latitude of 47˚ 32’ South, and Longitude 179˚ 02’ East, and are a small group of barren rocks covering a space of four or five miles, with innumerable quantities of sea fowl. At 8 o'clock, resumed our course ENE with the wind at NW and hazy weather, which has continued much the same up to this day. Having gained one day since leaving West Longitude and have again arrived into West Longitude, we have had two Wednesdays this week to correct our account. Latitude today 41˚ Longitude 165˚ 28’ West

Wednesday, December 25, 1844 Christmas 

Was spent by us with as much of the usual pomp and ceremony of drinking and feasting as our circumstances would admit. We had roast pig, pies, gingerbread, new bread, and old butter, etc. On the whole, we fared pretty well considering we have been at sea for five months and 8 days. Those that wished it were treated to gin, brandy, and wine by Capt. Destin and our Chief Mate. And right glad am I that there were some that had moral courage enough to refuse even wine. The day before, we saw two ships steering to the westward. We ran for them, but did not speak to them. The wind quite fresh at WNW and thick, could not see more than five miles. At night, at 9 ½ o'clock, saw another ship distant, about ½ mile, steering westward. Christmas day, blows strong from WNW, and we run under our double reefed main topsail and foresail, steering East. At 4 o'clock PM, luffed to, heading NNE. Latitude at noon 45˚ 58’ Longitude 15˚ 6’ West. First saw the Comet this night. 

Thursday, December 26, 1844

Morning moderate. Made sail, steering N & E. At 6 o’clock, passed a carcass and saw a whale, and lowered for him. Didn’t get him. Stood on N by E till noon. Latitude 45˚ 26’ Longitude 154½˚

Sunday, December 28, 1844

The weather since Thursday has been squally and rugged. But a little chance for whaling, had we have seen any. But such has not been the case. Since Saturday at 2 o'clock PM, it has been blowing a gale from SW, and we have been laying to under a close-reefed main topsail. At this time, 7 PM, it moderates fast. Been employed all day repairing jib. Latitude at 2 o'clock 43˚ 48’ Longitude 155˚ 04’

Monday, December 29, 1844 

It moderates fast and ends calm. At sunrise, made sail, heading to the westward. Latitude 43˚ 48’ at noon.

Tuesday, December 30, 1844

Moderate breeze. At N-W. Steered W-S-W

Wednesday, January 1, 1845 

Made sail at sunrise, steering SSW all day to noon, after which, steered S. Latitude 45˚ 10’ Longitude 159˚ West. This day, have fine weather cruising to the South and West. Saw nothing. At noon, Latitude 45˚ 10’ Longitude 15˚ 9’ At sunset, took in sail and headed to the N & E. The next morning…

Thursday, January 2, 1845

Rain, wind, and fog. At 8 o’clock, kept off East. Remainder of the day, fine weather and a light breeze at West. At 9½ o’clock, observed the angular distance of the sun and moon, which made our Longitude 158˚ 5’ West of Greenwich. Thursday, and…

Friday, January 3, 1845

Moderate breeze at S & E, head to the N & E.  

Saturday, January 4, 1845 

Spoke [spoke to] the ship Niantic. Seven months out of Sag Harbor. One thousand bbls. [barrels] of oil. Spoke the ships Alert and Lowell in December. Full, and sailed for home. 

Sunday, January 5, 1845

The wind strong at East. Heading to the N & E in company with the Niantic. Capt. Slate on board us for dinner. Latitude at noon 35˚ 00’ Longitude 155˚

Monday, January 6, 1845 

The wind continues at ENE. At 12 noon, wear ship [to put the helm up, instead of down as in tacking, so the stern is presented to the wind], and headed SE & ESE. 

Thursday, January 9, 1845

Fog and rain. Wind the same. Can scarcely see half a mile. About 4 PM, saw whales. At 6 o’clock, tack ship, head N. At 7½ o’clock, whales again close by. Shortened sail.

Friday, January 10, 1845

It yet remains very thick and a strong breeze. Heading SE. At 1 PM, saw whales again. Lowered three boats. Got nothing. Saw whales again at 4 PM. Lowered two boats.Got nothing. Whales remain in sight until sunset. Shortened sail. Blowing strong. 

Saturday, January 11, 1845

Made moderate sail. At sunrise, blows a moderate gale, and increasing. At 1 PM, laying to under close-reefed main topsail. Heading N. Wind ENE. Latitude at noon (by obs.) 47˚ 09’

Sunday, January 12, 1845

The gale has abated a little, but continues thick with rain. At 8 o'clock AM, made moderate sail, heading N & N by W. No observation today.  At 4 o’clock PM, took in sail. Blows and rains. At 6 o’clock, the wind shifts to North. During the night, shifts to West, and blows heavy.

Monday, January 13, 1845

Morning clear, with a strong breeze at West at sunrise. Kept off to NE and made sail. We are now bound off of the ground. Having been cruising, here since the 25th of December and only seen whales one day with any kind of chance to whale. Latitude (by obs.) at noon 46˚ 18’ Longitude (by lunar distance) at 2 PM 151˚ 20’. In the afternoon at 6½ o’clock, saw whales. Lowered three boats and chased them. Gallied them [frightened the whales] and came on board. Took in sail. Wind light and the weather pleasant. Whales close to the ship all night.

Tuesday, January 14, 1845 

Morning at daylight, made sail. Light breeze at N. Heading ENE. First thing we saw was a whale close under the ship’s bow. Lowered three boats. But as he was gallied by the ship, soon gave him up. Hoisted up the boats. Soon saw more, and down and after them, etc. Lowered again about 7 o’clock. Got nothing this time. Lowered again about 2 o’clock PM and chased a whale two hours, and gave him up. Stood on the wind to the N & W. At sunset, took in sail. Moderate breeze at N, but looks like approaching bad weather. Latitude at 46˚ 05’ Longitude (by chronometer) 150˚ 19’ West

Wednesday, January 15, 1845

Made all sail at daylight in the morning with a moderate breeze at NNE, but soon increases to a moderate gale and some squalls. At 10 AM, down to double reefed topsails, which continues until night. Saw no whales today. Steered E by N. At sunset, took in sail. Wind about N. Latitude at noon (by obs.) 45˚ 48’ South

Thursday, January 16, 1845

During the night, the wind shifts to ENE, and blows and rains heavy. Moderates a little in the morning. At 9 o’clock AM, made sail heading NW. At 11 o’clock. increases to a strong gale at N. Heading WNW. Laying to, under close-reefed main topsail and fore spencer. Barometer down to 28˚ No observation at noon. Thermometer up to 58˚ today.

Friday, January 17, 1845

The wind shifted suddenly from N to West yesterday afternoon about three o’clock, and by 6 o'clock had increased to a violent gale, with a cross sea from NE & N, and lastly, from West, which caused our ship to labor so badly that we were obliged to luff to and lay under bare poles with all sails furled, previous to which we had only a double reefed main topsail and foresail and fore top mizzen stay sail set. And steering NE by E and ENE, until we were in danger of losing our boats, when we hove to under a tarpaulin in the mizzen rigging. For myself, I scarce ever saw it blow and rain harder - for about 3 hours. During the night it had moderated,  so that at day light we commenced making sail. At ten, have single reefed top sails and main sail and jib, etc. At 8 o'clock run over a whale (nearly). I should say, before we saw him. But, kept on, for we are now anxious to get away from this place. It is up to this hour quite moderate and clear. But strange to tell, we have not had any lookout to the masthead today, which is a proof that our captain wants to leave here as soon as the wind will carry us. 5 o’clock PM, the wind now at NW. Our course, NE. Latitude at noon 45˚ 31’ Longitude at 2 PM 147˚ 35’

Sunday, January 19, 1845

With light variable winds and squalls of rain, and finally at SE. Course N by East. Latitude at noon (by obs.) 44˚ 47’ South. During the night, say betwixt 12 and 4 o’clock, some mischievous fellow or fellows took it into their heads to throw the remains of a porpoise overboard. And, as this was intended for breakfast, it was missed early in the morning by the cook and steward. At 7 bells, or 7 o’clock I believe, Capt. Destin came on deck and the steward informed him of the circumstance. He ordered all hands called. When Mr. Lyons, the second officer, came up, he asked him if he knew anything about the porpoise. To which he replied, he did not, saying that it was very dark and rained in his watch. To which, Capt. Destin says, “I could have seen if God Almighty himself had have come down, I would have seen him.” He next proceeded to inquire of the whole ship’s company if any one knew anything about this absent porpoise. But, no one knew anything about it. He then said that there would be no watch below in the daytime, or anything allowed to eat but beef and bread until he found out who threw the porpoise overboard. In the meantime, he had ordered the cook to throw overboard the breakfast that was preferred, which consisted of a codfish hash. This law was also to extend to the cabin, for our breakfast was also thrown over, thereby making us all partakers of his discipline, which to me appeared very strange. However, we were let off by being kept out of our watch below all day, for we were permitted to have our duff for dinner. But, the crew’s forward was given to the hog. At supper, we also had our sufferance. As usual, Capt. Destin, having concluded not to pinch himself to punish the crew. About sunset, it was hinted around that a chap by the name of Danielson was making a considerable sport about this affair, saying that he would say it was him for fifty cents, and “how does porpoises jump?” etc. when he was coming from aloft. This coming to Capt. Destin’s ears, he sent for him and inquired what he meant. “Oi, only in fun” was the reply. “Darn you” and a punch of the nose, and a blow in the face. “Up there on them cross trees”, meaning the mizzen top gallant cross trees, where he remained until twelve o’clock at night.

Monday, January 20, 1845

About 4 o’clock this morning, the breeze is moderate at S, with a little rain. Course N by E. “Danielson go to masthead” was heard. It finally was made known to Capt Destin that Danielson threw over the porpoise. About 8 o'clock, he was called down and offered his breakfast, but would not eat any, also at dinnertime and supper, and at 7½ o’clock PM, is called down and locked up under the cabin stairs, after being to the masthead 15½ hours, with the exception of coming down and coming up three times. The rogue being caught, the cookery is to go on as usual, and the watches as before, and the officers are exempt from discipline. Latitude at noon 42˚ 17 Longitude at 2 PM 142˚ 17

Sunday, January 26, 1845

From Monday to Thursday, we had a moderate breeze from S to E. Since then, it has been variable from East to N & NW, with moderate fine weather. Today is foggy, and a light breeze at N. Steering by the wind NE & ENE. The first part of the week, course N by East. Latitude today (by obs.) 35˚ 37’ Longitude (by chronometer) 133˚ 17’ 

Danielson abstained from food of any kind (of his own consent) from Sunday night to Thursday night, during which time he has been kept shut up (on an average 16 hours out of 24) under the cabin stairs, a place less than 4 feet square.

Monday, January 27, 1845 

This day, light breeze at NNW. Steering NE by the wind. 

The blacksmith employed making handcuffs, and Capt. Destin put them on him in the afternoon. And, at this moment while I write, the harsh and gloomy jinglings of his irons causes my blood to chill within my being. During the day he is permitted to go on deck and set up on the stern – and look astern only. To witness all this for so small an offence cannot but create in a man who has a spark of humanity within him, horror and disgust. In the afternoon, sent up studding sail booms and flying jib. At 6 PM, lowered for whales. Saw them but once. 

Tuesday, January 28, 1845 

Fine light weather. Wind NNW. Steering N & E. Sent down the fore yard today (and sent up another) on account of decay, also top and lower studding sail booms.

Thursday, January 30, 1845 

Light breeze from SW. Set studding sails. At night, shifts to NW. Continues light and baffling [light wind that frequently shifts from one point to another] up to Sunday.

Sunday, February 2, 1845 

Have light breeze from WSW to WNW with light squalls of rain. Course NW by N. Latitude at noon 29˚ 27’ Longitude 129˚

Sunday, February 9, 1845 (at Pitcairn Island February 7 & 8)

Distant from Pitcairn Island, 25 miles N by W. Two ships in sight near the island. We have a light breeze from NNW. Heading NE by the wind. On Thursday morning last, at 5 o’clock in the morning, saw Pitcairn Island bearing N by E, distant 20 miles, while we were steering NW by N, with the wind moderate at SE, and studding sails out, and expecting to see it ahead at sunrise. At half past five, took in studding sails and luffed up for the island. Saw a sail astearn of us, also steering for the island. When we luffed up for the land, she was a beam of us. At three o’clock, we had the island South of us, 10 miles distant. The breeze quite light during the day. The other ship closed in to the land with her main topsail aback. Saw another ship to the windward of the island. All Thursday night, plying to the windward to get up so as to land early in the morning. At sunrise in the morning of Wednesday, closed in, say two miles, prepared to go on shore at 6 o'clock. Three canoes came off, in on one of which came George Adams, and in another Christian, and in another Quintal. All three, grandsons of the three men of that name who were of the crew of the Bounty at the time of the mutiny and subsequently landed at this island, and peopled it, or as you see, laid the foundation of its present population. We remained in communication with this people until Saturday afternoon and were received and treated with so kindly and with so much manifestation of a Christian spirit that we were loath to part. 

The two ships were the Splendid and John Wells, of Cold Spring and Sag Harbor. Three hundred bbls. each, 7 months out. We received in exchange for cotton cloth and axes and other small trifles, sweet potatoes and Irish potatoes, bananas, coconuts, water, melons, limes, etc., all of which are very good. 

The people of this island are a very remarkable people. They are a religious, sober and industrious class. They know no crime, consequently have no need of laws. But, these they have a code, I believe drawn up by the old patriarch, John Adams. But, criminal offences are not known among these people. There are at this time 128 on the island, including two white men who are married and have families. Their wives are of the natives. None of these natives have ever been anywhere except to the Island of Otaheite (Tahiti), where they all emigrated in 1829, or 1830. Not being satisfied with that country, they only remained 6 months there and then returned to their old home, where they are unanimously agreed to live and die, and here to be buried with their Fathers.

Sunday, February 16, 1845

Fine weather with a light breeze from NE. Steering NNW. At ten o'clock AM, saw a sail bearing N. At 2 o’clock PM, spoke Ship Panama of Sag Harbor, 8 months out, 700 bbls. Gammed until sunset. The weather has been light and pleasant since we left Pitcairn Island. During the past week, we have had the ship shut up for the purpose of smoking out the mice. But after keeping her smoke-tight forty hours, have not killed them all. Latitude at noon 13° 42` 

Sunday, February 23, 1845 

In the North Pacific. The weather since last Sunday has been light and pleasant with a moderate breeze at the eastward. Today fine and pleasant light breeze at NE. Course since the 16th, N by W. Today N by W½W. Latitude at noon (by obs.) 12° 41` North 

Sunday, March 2, 1845

Fine breeze at East. Steering NW since Thursday, with strong Trade Winds at NE, and finally sometimes as much as we could carry, double reefed topsails, too. Latitude 16° 17’ Longitude 143°

Sunday, March 9, 1845

Is moderately fine with a light breeze from East, with heavy rain in the forenoon. Employed refitting the fore topmast and top gallant mast. Saw the Island of Owyhe (Hawaii) and Maui, or Mowee, to the South and South & West, distant 20 miles. Since last Sunday, the weather has been pleasant with light winds and calm. Friday morning saw a ship to the northward, steering westward. Saturday sent down fore topmast and sent up another, the old one being rotten. Today, the ship first seen on Friday is ahead of us, five miles. At sunset, we are close in to the north side of Maui and, with any wind, shall be at anchor under the southwest end at Lahinia (Lahaina) by ten o’clock tomorrow forenoon.

All hands are in first rate health, and Danielson is yet in irons and kept under the cabin stairs through the night and during meal times. Distance at six o’clock PM from the northeast part of Maui ten miles, 10°. At ten at night, hove to and lay until 5 o’clock the next morning.

Monday, March 10, 1845

Morning, kept off, with a light breeze from the eastward with squalls of rain. Stood in to Lyra Bay with a ship 8 miles ahead of us, steering westward, the breeze freshening. And about 2 o’clock, saw the shipping at anchor at Lahaina. And at half past 3, came to anchor in the midst of 21 other ships. And found that the ship we had seen the three days past was the Nantasket of New London, Capt. Parker Smith, 21 months out, with 2500 bbls. of oil just from the Coast of Chile, and bound from hence to the NW. She anchored one hour before us. We also found the Dromo, 600, Benj Morgan, 2100, North America, 150, Isaac Hicks, 200 and 5 months out. By this last ship I had the pleasure to receive 3 letters: one from my wife, one from my brother Giles, one from William Anderson Esqr.

Tuesday, March 11, 1845 

Come in, five ships sailed, Panama, Sabina, Caledonia, Albion, Amethyst, one boiling. One watch on shore today.

Wednesday, March 12, 1845

This day quite pleasant. On shore through the day. Saw but little that was pleasing, or worth seeing. Came in today, Ship Neva of New York. Sailed this day, two ships, one of them the York. Got 100 bbls. of water.

Thursday, March 13, 1845 

At sunrise, got of 26 casks of water hove up and cleared our anchor kt, ships bends, etc. One watch on shore. Upon liberty, sailed one ship, and arrived one, and two more in the offing.

Friday, March 14, 1845

Fine pleasant weather this day. Is my turn to be on shore. But instead of going on shore, I stay on board and occupy the time in writing home to my wife and friends.

Saturday, March 15, 1845 

All hands employed on board in setting up the standing rigging, fore and aft. Come in, four ships, sailed two.

Sunday, March 16, 1845 

Is a pleasant day but a Strong breeze from the Southward – to day I wrote two letters – one to my Brother Giles and one to William Anderson.

Monday, March 17, 1845 

This morning we got off our last water (nine casks), and 20 bbls. of potatoes come alongside, and we took in them, and the water. And went on shore on liberty at ten o'clock. Toward night, commenced to rain and blow quite strong from about South. At 7 PM, gave the ship 70 fathoms of the larboard chain. And at 8 o’clock, let go the starboard bower, and payed out 30 fathoms. At ten o'clock, blows quite a gale. Called all hands. The ship Caledonia a dragging and likely to come a foul of us. She just clears us. Send down royal yards. One ship gets under way, and goes to sea about 1 o'clock. We are getting ready to slip our anchors and run too, after two o’clock. We of the larboard watch turn in. So ends this day and night.

Tuesday, March 18, 1845 

At daylight this morning, the gale continues to increase gradually. Several ships have dragged and some have fouled. The ship Calumet has lost jib boom. The Nantasket, fore topsail yard. And, four or five have gone to sea. The Isaac Hicks has dragged about two miles and, this morning at 7 o'clock, got under way, and ran out to the northward of the islands. Most all of the thirty ships have started their anchors. We have sent down our royal mast and  top gallant yards. At 8 o’clock, our chains being buoyed and ready, we slip and run to sea, after cruising about betwixt Maui and Raini (Lanai) and Moloki (Molokai) until near night. We up helm and run out to the northward of Maui, and several ships in company. Saw but few ships laying at the anchorage at sunset. That night, blows very hard. Lay to, under close-reefed main topsail and fore spencer closed, under the north side of Maui.

Wednesday, March 19, 1845 

Continues blowing strong. Twenty ships in sight, Danielson was sent on shore on Monday at Lahaina to the Consul’s, and returned on board at night and locked up under the cabin stairs where he is kept night and day, and only allowed bread and water. The wind shifted suddenly to NW.

Thursday, March 20, 1845

Moderates, and we make sail near the east end of Maui. 25 ships in sight. Bend a jib in the place one split last night. The wind hauls to WSW. 

Friday, March 21, 1845

Fine, pleasant, with a light breeze at about North. Steering along the north side of the island, with 26 sail in sight. At sunset, we are just about where we were on Monday morning, the 10th. So ends, and all are well.

Saturday, March 22, 1845

We got back to the anchorage at about 3 PM, and got our cables with but little trouble. There also come in about 20 ships in company with us. We hove up our starboard anchor and found it broke. Several other ships had their anchors broke, and some lost them entirely. One ship broke her windlass. Come in on the same night, bark Clement of New London.

Sunday, March 23, 1845 

Fine weather. I went on shore to church, and to get somethings besides salt beef and pork to eat. Come on board at 1 o’clock PM. Come in today, eight and ten ships. Capt. Destin sent Danielson on shore to get a ship, and he remained and got put in the fort. Arrived, ship John and Elizabeth, 600 bbls., 8 months out.

Monday, March 24, 1845

Fine weather today. Came in, three ships. One, the Morrison, Capt. Green, of New London, 6 months out, 350 bbls. of oil, with one man in irons for an attempt to set fire to the ship. Today, got ten bbls. of potatoes, and 50 pumpkins more. Outside, 4 Ships. 35 Ships in the roads.

Tuesday, March 25, 1845

Fine weather. At 8 o’clock, prepare to go to sea. Hove short, and run a line to haul outside of the other ships. Hove up, and got out, with but little trouble. At half-past nine, Capt. Destin came off and got Danielson's chest and bedding, etc., and carried on shore to the Consul’s  office. At half-past 11 o’clock, came up a little breeze, and we make sail for Hawaii. Capt. Destin come off, and we moved off slowly, in company with the ship Dromo (Capt. Steel), ship Isaac Hicks, and bark Vermont. By 4 o’clock, the shipping at Lahaina were out of sight. At 8 o’clock, were down to the west end of Lanai. Finished my letter to Giles.

Wednesday, March 26, 1845 

Fine weather. By daylight in the morning, we were down to Diamond Head. At 8 o’clock. Capt. Destin goes on shore at Honolulu to get an anchor for the ship. He purchases one of C. Brewer & Company of about 1700 cwt, for which he has to pay from twelve to thirteen cents per pound. At twelve o'clock at noon, we get it on board. At 2 o'clock, I witness the funeral ceremony of Riakeal (Haʻalilio), the Ambassador to the United States from the Government of the Sandwich Islands, who died on his way home from the States fifteen days after leaving Boston in the ship Montreal, in company with Mr. Richards. The funeral was attended by an immense concourse of people of all grades. At about 3 o'clock, the procession began to move from the fort. The corpse was preceded by the soldery of Honolulu, headed by the band of blacks, who played the Marseilles Hymn. Then came the Marine Corps from HBM (HMS) Talbot. Next was the corpse, then the mourners: family connection, etc., and then the native citizens, mingling with the foreign residents, then the king, royal family, the officers of the government,  officers of the ship Talbot, seamen of ditto. The king walked with Her Britannic Majesty's Counsel, M. Willie. And the queen, with another white gentleman. The procession was followed by the ladies in a long train. I should think that the whole was near an half mile in length. It was a very imposing sight to behold, one to which called forth many a solemn reflection, particularly in reference to this people who were so recently in heathen degradation. All business was suspended in the afternoon during the funeral. The corpse was taken to the native church where there was prayers and singing. Whether there was a sermon or not, I cannot say. The ceremony was closed by the discharge of artillery on the fort.  At about sunset we returned on board, and steered for Attoi (Kauai)

Thursday, March 27, 1845

Steered from Hawaii, SW,  6 hours, with a light breeze, 4 knots. Then, W by N till 4 PM, when we were off the south side of Kauai, distant 20 miles. Spoke the ship Huntsville of Cold Spring, Capt. Howe, 5 months out, 80 bbls. of oil. Captain come on board of the Merrimac, his old ship on a previous voyage. Lay off and on during the night, with light breeze from the SW.

Friday, March 28, 1845

At 7 o'clock, started for the shore, with one boat being at the time 15 miles off, with a light air of wind. Got on shore about 9 o'clock, in company with Capt. Fordham of the ship Splendid of Cold Spring, and Capt. Howe of Huntsville, of ditto, with three boats. We found that we could not get what we wanted at that place. Remained but a short time. Started for another town, called Papape (Kekaha?), 7 mile farther to the westward. Arrived there about one o'clock PM. Soon obtained a boat load of pigs for about 4 pieces of cloth and started for the ship about half past two o'clock, she being just 15 miles off, and it calm. Got on board about 5 o clock PM, in company with Capt. Steel of ship Dromo, who had also been on shore where we first landed, and could get nothing. The weather light and pleasant. Kept on to the westward. Capt. Steel  remained to try again the next day. Steering betwixt Kauai and Onehow (Niihau) at daylight on.

Saturday, March 29, 1845

At daylight in the morning, were abreast of the east end Niihau. Course West. Saw the Splendid and Huntsville astern. At 6 o’clock, the PM, the Huntsville passed across our bows, steering W by N, and the Splendid off our larboard quarter, 15 miles distant - The wind moderate at NE. Sailing at the rate of 5 miles per hour, course W half S, the land out of sight.

Sunday, March 30, 1845

Fine pleasant weather with a steady light breeze from N-E. Course W½S. The ship Huntsville ahead 12 miles. 4 PM, spoke the Splendid and had a “gam.”

Monday, March 31, 1845

Continues fine weather. The Huntsville not in sight. Course W½S. Wind NE. Bent a fore topsail, and new main top gallant sail.

Tuesday, April 1, 1845

Fine weather with a steady 7 knot breeze at NE. Course W¾S. “Gammed” with the Splendid in the afternoon.

Wednesday, April 2, 1845

Fine weather with a steady 8 knot breeze at N. Course W. The Splendid 10 miles astern.

Thursday, April 3, 1845 

Remains good weather with a strong breeze at NNE. Course WNW. Today put up chain cutting pendants.

Friday, April 4, 1845

Fine weather with a moderately good breeze at ENE. At 2 o’clock PM, saw a sail to the south and west. At 4 o’clock spoke her. The Huntsville “gammed” until 8 o’clock. Steering WNW, and the Steering NNW. The Splendid 6 miles astern at 4 o’clock, and at 8 when we kept off to NW by N, she was up with us. Latitude 26° Longitude 179° 50’

Saturday, April 5, 1845

Fine weather with a pleasant breeze at SE. Course WNW. The Huntsville 5 miles ahead and gaining upon us. The Splendid out of sight. In the afternoon, “gammed” with the Huntsville. Crossing the opposite meridian today and being in east longitude again. We reckon this Sunday losing one day by going westward. Longitude today East.

Monday, April 6, 1845

The forenoon, steady breeze at SE. Steering NW, in company with the ship Huntsville. In the afternoon, wind shifts suddenly to SW and squally. Through the day, rain and sudden shifts of wind. Latitude about 30°

Tuesday, April, 7, 1845

This day strong winds and rain with the wind at NE and cold. No ship In sight. Steering NNW.

Wednesday, April 8, 1845

This day, squally and cold rain. The ship under double reefed topsails.

Thursday, April 9, 1845

This day, quite moderate with a moderate breeze at last. Steering NNW & N by East. At sunset, took in sail, being on the whale ground. The weather for two days past has been foggy.

Friday, April 10, 1845

At daylight in the morning, made sail. Heading N by East. Wind East and light, with thick fog at the times. Saw a ship astern, heading to the northward, and one to the north and west. The afternoon calm. At sunset, took in sail.

Saturday, April 11, 1845

This day at daylight, made sail with a moderate breeze at WNW. Steered to the northward till noon. Spoke ship Huntsville. Steering to the southward. Wear round and steered WSW, with a strong breeze. Capt. Howe come on board and stayed until 4 PM. Latitude at noon 35° 17’ North

Sunday, April 12, 1845

Last night, ship under double reefed topsails. Steering to the westward. This morning, made all sail. Steering W. Wind NE. Saw the Huntsville to the southward. Weather clear and pleasant.

Monday, April 13, 1845

Today we have fine clear weather and a light breeze at S. Steered WSW & SW. Saw a few finbacks. Latitude at noon 35º North, Longitude 174º East

Tuesday, April 14, 1845

The forenoon, rain and fog, with a moderate breeze at S & SW. Steering W & WNW. Saw a ship to the southward, steering westward. The afternoon clear, with light breeze. Towards night, foggy. Carrying all sail tonight, with the wind at SW. Steering WSW.

Wednesday, April 15, 1845

Strong breeze from W & NW. Steered to the northward by the wind. At ten, tacked to the S & W. At 11 AM, spoke ship Louvre, Capt. Green, of New London, 8½  months out, 500 bbls. Gammed till night. By the Louvre, I received a package from my Olive. Latitude at noon 37º 05’. The afternoon, quite a light breeze. At night, squally from the NW. By the wind with starboard, tacks aboard. Put up the stove in the cabin today.

Thursday, April 16, 1845

Is moderately fine. No fog. At times, strong gusts of wind. Carrying top gallant sail most of the day. In the afternoon, gammed with the Louvre. Saw plenty of finbacks and streaks of red whale feed. WN & NW steering by the wind, with starboard tack down.

Friday, April 17, 1845

This day, moderately good weather, with a good strong whole sail breeze from NE. Steered WNW, in company with the Louvre, in the morning, about 5 miles off, on our larboard quarter. At night, she is fifteen miles off, astern. At noon, saw another sail 3 points off the lee quarter, steering after us, and gaining. Supposed to be the Huntsville. At sunset, fifteen miles off astern. At sunset, saw right whales. Took in sail.

Saturday, April 18, 1845

Has been blowing. A gale. Ship under light sail heading eastward. Two ships in sight, in the afternoon. Ship to windward. Came down and spoke us. It was the Huntsville. Saw a whale this morn. A pig died by eating beans today.

Sunday, April 19, 1845

The gale continues unabated as yesterday. Saw nothing, but two ships and some whale feed.

Monday, April 20, 1845 

Continues with a gale from NE. Saw one sail to leeward.

Tuesday April 21, 1845

The gale continues without abating in the least. No ships in sight today. Heading to the eastward since yesterday.

Wednesday, April 22, 1845

The gale has broke and we have fine weather, with a light breeze from NE. Steering on the wind NNW & NW. In the forenoon, I saw a ship to the southward steering to the eastward. In the afternoon, saw a ship to the northward. By our reckoning, today we are 60 miles to the southward and westward of where we were on Friday night when the gale commenced and where we saw whales.

Thursday, April 23, 1845

Fine weather and a fine breeze from the S & SW. Steered NNW & NW. In the afternoon, saw a dead whale in a state of decomposition. Supposed it to have been dead two or three weeks. Carried moderate sail last night. Latitude at noon 37° 40’ North

Friday, April 24, 1845

Strong breeze from SSW. Steering NW. Saw a number of finbacks. Weather very hazy. At night, short sail. Latitude at noon today 37° 48’ North

Saturday, April 25, 1845

Lay by last night under easy short sail, with the wind strong, with rain from the south and west this morning. Moderates at half past 6 o’clock. Made sail at 7 o'clock, with the wind at WNW. Steered N. Saw a sail to the eastward, steering to the northward. Saw several humpbacks. At 5 o'clock in the afternoon, spoke the ship India, Capt. Miller, of New London 8½  months out, with 300 bbls. of oil. Kept company through the night, and…

Sunday, April 27, 1845

Fine weather. Saw a number of humpbacks, and gammed with the India all day, with a whole sail breeze at SW. Steered NW & WNW. The India rather out sail the Merrimac. At night, parted. Latitude at noon 42°12’

Monday, April 28, 1845

Light air and calm. Lowered our boats for a humpback. Saw a ship to the south and east. Supposed, the India. The weather thick, could not see over two miles. At night, a light breeze. Steering WNW. Saw a ship boiling.

Tuesday, April 29, 1845

Thick, hazy, and rain. Cruised eastward and W. Westward, saw a carcass recently cut. In the afternoon, lowered three boats for finback. Thick fog. Cleared up at one o'clock. Made sail. Set in thick again at 4 o'clock. At 6, shortened sail. Heading W by S. Breeze, light.

Wednesday, April 30, 1845

At daylight, made sail heading WNW. The wind, strong with fog and rain from about S. At 9 AM, stood to the eastward, with much rain. At ten, took in sail. Saw some humpbacks.

Thursday, May 1, 1845

The wind NE, and cold. By ten, saw whales. Latitude at noon 45°. The wind shifted at 9 o'clock last night. Today is a moderate gale. Laying to. Saw some right whales this forenoon. Latitude at noon (by obs.) 45° 01’ North, Longitude at 2 PM 162° 43’ East

Friday, May 2, 1845

Today we have a very heavy gale with rain, snow and hail from NE. At 6½ AM, close-reefed the main topsail. At 9, furled it. Lay all day under fore & main spencers.

Saturday, May 3, 1845

Last night, the gale abated. This morning, made sail. Saw several humpbacks. Saw a ship to the eastward at 2 PM. Spoke ship Houqua, New Bedford, At sunset, let double-reef top sails. Heading N with good weather. Moderate breeze at ENE, and clear.

Sunday, May 4, 1845

[Ink image of a whale’s tail.] 

Moderate weather, with a strong breeze at ENE. Saw a brig steering NW. Supposed to be a Russian-bound to St. Peters and St. Pauls on Kamchatka. In the afternoon, saw several right whales. Got fast to two. Got one. Boat stove [staved: crushed or broken] and cut from the whale at sundown, the weather cold, and the men suffered much by being in the water. Saw a bark to the westward, whaling. Latitude at noon (by obs.) 44° 20’

Monday, May 5, 1845

[Ink image of a whale’s tail.] 

Today, a strong breeze and rugged. Saw one ship, and plenty of whales. Lowered six times. Got fast to one whale and the irons drew [pulled out of the whale]. At 6 o’clock, foggy. Took in sail. Cruised today to the North and to the S & E. Whales wild and hard to get hold of. Bad luck. So ends.

Tuesday, May 6, 1845

[Ink image of a whole whale.] 

This morning, thick fog and calm. At 11 o’clock, lights up a little. Saw a whale one mile off. Lowered two boats, and struck him. Lowered a third boat. At 3 PM, got him killed. At 4 o’clock, got him alongside. At sunset, got the head in, and made fast for the night. Wind light at NE. Saw several whales, and one ship to the south of us. The whale is a very large one, but not very fat. Thus, we have succeeded in taking one after almost ten months from home.

Wednesday, May 7, 1845

Thick fog. At noon, finished cutting the whale. In the morning, a light breeze. In the afternoon, calm. Commenced to boil. Ten o’clock at night, breezes up at SSW, and cold. Ship headed SE by E.

Thursday, May 8, 1845

In the morning, rain and strong breeze at WSW.  Wore ship [turned from the wind] and headed NW. Saw whales, with a moderate gale. At 5 PM, the gale increased, and a heavy sea. Cooled down the works.

Friday, May 9, 1845

[Ink image of a whole whale, but head is incomplete.] 

Moderates. Started the works at 5 AM. Continues to moderate. Made sail at 11 o’clock. At one o’clock, saw whales. The First and Second Mate lowers, and in a half hour struck, one mile to leeward. The captain lowers, and pulls for the other boats, leaving me on board of the ship without any orders to lower or not. In fifteen minutes, I wore the ship around and stood along a half mile to windward of the boats and backed the main topsail, and then lowered my boat, and pulled down to the whale, then to the windward of the other three boats, and heading towards me, not spouting any blood. As soon as near enough, ordered my boatsteerer to fasten on to the whale with one iron, and at the same time to give him a lance. The iron did not touch the whale, but the lance went the whole length into the whale in a place to kill him. As soon as I could get up to him again, I got the iron in, and another lance. By this time, the captain (the black-hearted wretch) was within a boat length of me and menacing me with his lance, elevated, threatening me with instant death if I did not cut my line and go to the ship. “God damn you to hell,” and much more that I need not mention. I had no knife in the head of my boat, for he had had it taken out to use in the blubber room and never replaced it. He, seeing I did not cut, also threatened to dart his lance though Lauriet if he did not cut the line. I then pulled to the ship. And before I got there, the whale was dead.

The captain came on board and asked me if I did not hear him tell me not to fasten to the whale. I answered that I did not and did not think anyone in the boat heard him give any such orders. He then asked Lauriat If he did not hear him tell him not to dart his harpoon, who answered that he did not. Capt. Destin then said to him, “You lie, you damned son of a bitch” etc.

Upon my saying a few words about his cursing me without a cause and threatening to dart his lance through me, he again raised a large weapon and threatened to beat my brains out if I did not stop talking, and ordered me below, saying I should not do any more duty on board of the ship and he would put me in irons, with a furious strain of other bitter and abusive language. His order to go below, I immediately obeyed. Up to Saturday night, I have done no duty, nor have I been requested too. At half past 3, got the whale along side and the fluke chain [chain put around the root of the whale’s tail] onto him. Took in sail. So ends.

Saturday, May 10, 1845

[Ink image of a whale’s tail.] 

This morning, in waking, the ship lost the whale from alongside, with two chains, a small one bent onto the large one to lengthen it, the whale having drifted on the wrong side of the ship in the night. Strong breeze with fog and rain from South. Cooled down in the morning. Commenced to boil again at 2 o'clock PM. Saw whale today. Quite rugged. At night, moderate. Latitude 46° North, Longitude 162° East

Sunday, May 11, 1845

[Three ink images of a whale’s tail.] 

Saw a number of whale. In fact, they were quite plenty. Our boats were down several times and struck three or four. One ran away with the captain, and he had to cut. The others drew their irons. Saw one ship to the westward, also a whaling. The wind light from the westward, and clear most of the day. I am yet off-duty, of course. Do no whaling. Only look on silently.   Capt. Destin has not spoken a word to me since the jar [discord] on Friday. Beside myself, there are four others off-duty, by illness. I am content with these easy times.

Monday, May 12, 1845

Early this morning, lowered for a whale close to the ship. Did not get him. Breeze strong and very cold from North, with a little snow. Fell in with the whale we lost on Saturday last. Got fast to him, and took in all sail, and lay by him. Stowed down 120 bbls. of oil. Saw one ship. Nothing said yet about going to work. 

Tuesday, May 13, 1845 

Finished stowing down 140 bbls. of oil, including what was stowed yesterday. Split out and cleaned the head of bone on deck. Hauled [obstructed word] whale alongside and cut off his flukes and got the chain, and let him go. Saw one ship to the southeast. This morning, Capt. Destin broached the subject by asking me if I wanted to go to work again. I said I had no objections if he wished me to do so. He replied that he had no wish either way, I might do as I pleased, and intimated that if I did not go to work I should lose the season. After talking over the affair, he said he was “Almighty mad at the time or he should not have said what he did.” I then told him I should go to my duty, and did so precisely at 8 o’clock AM. At one o’clock, made sail, steering to the southward. Saw a bark to the southeast, steering northward. Wind WSW, with clear weather. At 4 o’clock, stood to the northward, saw some humpbacks. At sunset, shortened sail.

Wednesday, May 14, 1845

[Ink image of a whale’s tail.] 

Middling good weather. Steered WNW, the wind SW. At 8 o’clock AM, lowered for a whale. Going quick, gave him up. At 3 PM saw three large whale feeding. Lowered three boats. In twenty minutes, I struck one, distant from the ship a half mile. In five minutes, shut in a thick fog. Lost sight of the ship. The whale took one take of line, and I cut. Could not see 20 rods. Saw no boats. Boat half full of water. Pulled in the direction of the ship. Saw the other boats. Saw them, and pulled for the ship, blowing our tin horns. They heard us, and we passed the ship to windward. The captain lowered, and came to us. So, we are safe on board.

Thursday, May 15, 1845 

In the morning, good weather, with a light breeze at SE. In the afternoon, blows rain and fog. Saw whales, and lowered three times today. At night, quite a gale until 10 o'clock, moderates.

Friday, May 16, 1845

Good weather today, and no whales in sight. Lowered for a calf, but did not get him. Shortened sail at sunset. Light breeze at SSW. Cruised to the westward.

Saturday, May 17, 1845

[Ink image of a whale’s tail.] 

Saw whales three times. Mr. Holt got fast to one, and lost a whale line. The forenoon, light breeze at SSW. In the afternoon, strong breeze from NW, with snow. Cruised to the southward. At 5 PM, took in the sail, quite a gale, and very cold.

Sunday, May 18, 1845

Blows a moderate gale, and cold, from NW. Lay to all day. Saw whales three times.

Monday, May 19, 1845

[Ink image of a whale’s tail.] 

Last night, quite moderate. This morning, light breeze, and good whale weather. Lowered at half past 6 o’clock. Mr. Holt struck and held on about one hour and a half, and lost his line again, with two irons. Saw more whales, but going too fast. At two in the afternoon, Saw the whale we struck in the morning, and chased him. Wore ship, and stood to the N & W. Commenced to blow strong at 5 o'clock. Took in the sail, and weather, cold. Ice made on deck last night. Wind SSW.

Tuesday, May 20, 1845

Is very cold & blustering with a moderate gale from WNW. Lay by all day under short sail. Saw no whales today.

Wednesday, May 21, 1845 

[Ink image of a whale’s tail.] [Ink image of a whole whale.] 

In the morning, light breeze and foggy. At 8 o’clock, clears up. Saw two whales. Struck one. Drew. At 10 o’clock, lowered again. Made a “miss frizzle.”  At 2 PM, saw four together, got one. Came in foggy at 4 o’clock. Finished cutting at half past 8 o’clock. Small whale, by Mr. Holt. At night, cold and fog, with a moderate breeze at S.

Thursday, May 22, 1845

Strong breeze at S, and thick fog. Commenced boiling at 6 AM. Strong breeze all day.

Friday, May 23, 1845

At sunrise, clear and pleasant. Made all sail at 5 AM. Saw plenty of whales, and lowered. Soon, set in thick fog and strong breeze. Shortened sail. At 9 o’clock, clears off. Strong breeze until 4 PM. Night, quite moderate, and good weather.

Saturday, May 24, 1845

In the morning, fine weather. Made all sail, with the wind quite light at SW. Lowered for whales at 8 o’clock. Came on board at 9. Broke out to stow down. Finished boiling at 8 o’clock AM. Set in foggy at 9 o’clock. Finished stowing down 95 bbls. at 4 PM. Moderate breeze at NNE. Steered W. At sunset, shortened sail. Continues foggy at night.

Sunday, May 25, 1845

In the morning, a moderate gale from the WNW, with rain and snow. Very cold. Took in the foresail at 7 AM. At 9, moderates. Lowered for a whale. Quite rough. Did not get him. In the afternoon, made sail. Saw more whales. Breeze increases. Shortened sail at half past 3 PM.

Monday, May 26, 1845

In the morning, quite good weather. Made sail at 5 o’clock. At 11 o’clock, shut in thick fog, with a light breeze at SW. Continues all night. Saw no whales. Shortened sail at 4 PM.

Tuesday, May 27, 1845

[Ink image of a whale’s tail.] 

Clear, moderate weather at daylight. In the morning, made sail. Commenced foggy at 6 o'clock. In the afternoon, clears up a little. Lowered for black fish. Mr. Holt struck a whale, and lost his line again, with two irons and spade. Saw a ship heading to the N & E. Most calm. Shortened sail at 6 PM.

Wednesday, May 28, 1845

The forenoon, strong breeze, with squalls of snow from NW. At 9 o’clock AM, spoke ship Franklin of New Bedford, one whale this season, stood to the S & W. At one o’clock, wore and stood to the N & S. At 3 PM, saw whales, and lowered. Boats came on board at 4 o’clock. Shortened sail. John Harris sick with the pleurisy. This day, killed Old Jack, the hog gotten at Fogo. Supposed to weigh 250 lbs.

Thursday, May 29, 1845

In the morning, very good weather. Made all sail at 4 o’clock, with a light breeze at SW. At 6½  o’clock, steered E by S. At 9 o’clock, saw whales. Chased 2 hours. Gallied them. Boats came on board at 11 o’clock. The afternoon, strong breeze, with rain and fog. Shortened sail at one o’clock. Towards night, quite moderate, and lightens up. Night, light weather.

Friday, May 30, 1845 

Light air, and calm. Saw one whale. Chased three miles. Came in foggy, gave him up. Shortened sail at 5 o’clock, calm and foggy. Night continues calm and foggy.

Saturday, May 31, 1845

[Ink image of a whale’s tail.] 

In the morning, calm and foggy. At 6 o'clock, clears off a little. Made sail, with a light air from W. At 9 o'clock, lowered three boats for whales 4 miles off. Chased until 11 o’clock. Struck. Capt. Destin got capsized, lost his line, cursed and swore tremendously. The whale went off, etc. So ends this day.

Sunday, June 1, 1845

Last night, commenced raining and blowing strong from SE. Continues until afternoon. Wind shifts to SW. Lay to all day, with starboard tacks aboard. Afternoon, foggy, no rain.

Monday, June 2, 1845

Strong breeze at NW, with fog and rain, the forenoon. At 11 o’clock, saw a whale, and struck him. Got him alongside about 12 o’clock. Commenced cutting about 1. Quite rugged. Did not finish until 8 in the evening. Lost one life. (Starboard Boat One Whale)

[Ink image of a whole whale.] 

Tuesday, June 2, 1845

Commenced boiling at 6 AM. Weather moderate and wind light in the forenoon. In the afternoon, snows. Saw no whale. End with thick weather. At night, blows strong from SW.

Wednesday, June 4, 1845 

Clear weather, with strong breeze from SW. Saw no whales. At night, thick fog, with a light breeze from SE and some rain.

Thursday, June 5, 1845

Today, have light breeze from WSW. Steered NW & N. Saw no whale but finbacks. The forenoon, thick. Afternoon, clear. Finished boiling at 7 AM. Stowed down one hundred bbls. (100 bbls.).

Friday, June 6, 1845

The forenoon, light air and calm. Saw one whale. The afternoon, strong breeze and thick fog. Wind from NW. Steered WSW. Shortened sail at sunset, about 8 o’clock.

Saturday, June 7, 1845

Made sale at half past 5 o’clock. Steering SW, with fine pleasant weather. At 8 o’clock AM, saw a whale, going quick. At 11 o’clock, lowered. Missed him. At 12, lowered again.

Tuesday, June 17, 1845 

Foggy until 11 o’clock AM. Saw two whales near the ship. Afternoon clear. Saw several whales. Lowered near 6 o’clock. Larboard quarter boat went on to one large whale, and missed. Breeze very light from SSW.

Wednesday, June 18, 1845 

Clear, with a light breeze from SE. Saw plenty of whale. Got fast to five today. Killed two. Sunk one and saved one – large one. The Larboard Quarter Boats. Stowed down 100 bbls. today.

Thursday, June 19, 1845 

Clear, fine weather. Plenty of whales all around us today. Tried several times to get hold of them. Cut in the one taken yesterday, and continue boiling. Breese moderate and light from ENE.

Friday, June 20, 1845 

Set in thick fog last night at 9 o’clock. Saw but few whales today. Clear, part of the day. Saw two ships, one boiling. But, little wind. Most of the time, calm.

Saturday, June 21, 1845

Clear, with a moderate breeze, with some rain in squalls. Saw three ships, one boiling. Spoke bark Rose of Halifax, 29 months, 2000 bbls., 1400 sperm. Saw but few whales, but a plenty of finbacks. Stowed down 100 & ten bbls. At night, strong breeze from SSE, heading SW.

Sunday, June 22, 1845 

Died at half past 2 o'clock this morning, Thomas Gates. Died of the dropsy on the brain. He was taken down a week ago yesterday. He has been sick most of the time since leaving New London. I have before wrote that he was not expected to live from one day to another. Part of the day, foggy. Spoke the Rose again today. Lowered for a whale in the forenoon. Come in foggy. In the afternoon, got a small whale. At 3 o’clock, buried Thomas Gates. I read the burial service from the Seaman's Hymn Book. Two of our boats were away at the time of the burial, laying by a whale. But, Capt. Destin could not wait. Got the whale alongside, and cut in by 9 o’clock PM.

Monday, June 23, 1845

The forenoon, calm. Saw few whales. Chased one. In the afternoon, light breeze from the Eastward. Saw two whales, and chased them. Could not get hold of them.

Tuesday, June 24, 1845

Last night, rained and blows strong from ENE, headed to the S & E. Today, stowed down 150 bbls. Spoke the Rose again, and the captain come on board of us. Blows a good breeze from the westward. Saw no whales, nor made any sail. Picked up a stoven boat today. Supposed to be a French merchant.

Wednesday, June 25, 1845

Strong breeze from NW. Steered East. Saw nothing but finbacks, until two o’clock PM when we were in the midst of whale in great plenty. Lowered and chased. Very rugged. Could not get up to any. Finished boiling at one o’clock PM. Shortened sail at 5 PM. Blows strong. Plenty of whales around us. Saw the barque Rose this morning to the eastward of us.

Thursday, June 26, 1845

Strong breeze and squalls of fog from the northward & E. Cruised to the N & W and S & E. Saw two whales in the morning.

Friday, June 27, 1845

Strong breeze and a heavy swell from the northward. Made sail at 4 o’clock AM. Some fog. Took in sail at 8 o’clock. Made sail again at 11 o'clock. Wore to the eastward. Saw whales at 6 o’clock, going to the eastward and northward quick. Carried double reefed topsails and fore sail. At night, not much fog. Wind light.

Saturday, June 28, 1845

Moderate breeze from N with squalls of thick fog. Saw whales. Took one very large one. Mr. Holt got his boat stove all to pieces and lost his line. The bow boat got the whale. Afternoon, some rain. Saw a ship today.

Sunday, June 29, 1845

All day, cutting the whale, which was very large and fat. Light breeze, not very thick. Saw several whales and lowered for them. About 4 o’clock PM, commenced boiling. At 5 o’clock PM, breeze light at N.

Monday, June 30, 1845 

Fine weather, with a light breeze. Lowered at 6 AM, and took a large whale, and cut in in the afternoon.

Tuesday, July 1, 1845

This day, light breeze from the westward, and thick and hazy. See no whales this day.

Wednesday, July 2, 1845

Light breeze from the South and East, with rain. Stowed down 140 bbls. in the forehold. Saw a whale breaching. Sign of a blow.

Thursday, July 3, 1845

Commenced blowing and raining heavy, at 10 o’clock AM. Cooled down at 5 PM. Saw two whales going to the Northward. Wind SSE, heading E. At night, much rain and strong breeze, with fog. Continued boiling through it all.

Friday, July 4, 1845

The forenoon, quite moderate with fog. Boiling and stowing down. Afternoon, rain in heavy showers. Cooled down the works at 3 PM. At 6 o’clock, moderates, started the fire again. At night, some rain and strong breeze from NW & W. Towards morning, N & E. Blows strong and foggy. Saw no whales yesterday.

Saturday, July 5, 1845

The forenoon, blows strong from the N & E, ship heading E. Finished boiling at noon. About 300 bbls. this far. Afternoon moderates. At sunset, clear. Wind NW and light, ship heading NNE. At 10 o’clock PM, commenced strong breeze. Continues all night. Heading to the N & E.

Sunday, July 6, 1845

In the morning, thick fog and strong breeze at NW. Moderates at 8 AM. Saw several whales. Lowered, but got nothing. Lowered five times through the day, and no success. Stowed down 100 bbls. of oil and chocked off the main hatchway. Quite moderate through the day, with some fog.

Monday, July 7, 1845

Saw two whales this day, but got nothing. Saw a ship to the northward. Steered to the westward most of the day, with a light top gallant breeze from N with much fog. At night. most calm. Head to the N & W.

Tuesday, July 8, 1845

Wind SE & S, with thick fog and rain. Steered westward. Saw two whales. Struck and killed one. Came on foggy, had to cut, and lost him. Heading to the westward with a fresh breeze from SE. Shortened sail at 6 PM.

Wednesday, July 9, 1845

Calm and foggy. Saw two whales. Lowered and chased. Going quick. Saw them only twice. Saw plenty of finbacks.

Thursday, July 10, 1845

Saw two ships. Spoke the ship Walton of New London, 9 months out,5 whales. Saw her take a blasted whale alongside. By her, I received a letter from Sister Fayerweather. Foggy most of the day. Light breeze. Steered to the westward. 

Friday, July 11, 1845

Foggy all day. Made sail at 8 AM, and steered W by S two hours. Lay with the main topsail aback until 4 PM. Shortened sail. Breeze very light from ESE. Saw nothing. Continues thick fog all night.

Saturday, July 12, 1845

Light breeze from WSW. Made sail at 10 o’clock AM. Thick fog. Saw several finbacks. Cruised to the N & W. Shortened sail at 7 o’clock PM, with a light breeze at SW, heading WNW. Continues thick through the night.

Sunday, July 13, 1845

The morning, foggy. Made sail at 9 AM. Steered to the N & W. At 10 AM, kept off to E, with a steady breeze at SW. Saw nothing but finbacks. Shortened sail at 7 PM. Got an observation at noon. The first time for 8 days. Latitude 47˚ 34’ N. Longitude 157˚ 50’ E. The water is quite green. 

Monday, July 14, 1845

Strong breeze from SSW through the night, and heavy fog. Continues today until noon. Made no sail until 4 PM. Wind hauls to WSW, and clears up for an hour. Made sail & steered ENE. Green water, and saw some finbacks. At 6 o’clock, heavy fog. Shortened sail at 7 o’clock. Heading NW by N. Moderate breeze. In the night, wind shifts to NW.

Tuesday, July 15, 1845

In the forenoon, the wind is from N, and strong breeze. Steered ENE. Saw several finbacks. Afternoon at 4 o’clock, tacked to the westward. At 1, got into blue water. At 7, got into green again. Weather clear part of the day. At night, headed ENE. Breeze quite light after 8 o’clock. Latitude 47° 15’ Longitude 160°-15’ 

Wednesday, July 16, 1845

Today we have clear weather after 6 o’clock AM. Made sail at 4½ o’clock, and saw a right whale. The first since Tuesday the 8th. Light breeze from NNW. Saw plenty of whales today. Lowered six times, but got nothing. Whales very shy and going quick to the S & W. Saw a ship to the SE, whaling. Shortened sail at 7½ o’clock, heading NE. Breeze light with a little thin fog. double reefed topsails at night.

Thursday, July 17, 1845

This day we are one year from home and have only about one quarter of a cargo as yet. Fine weather. Saw but one whale this day. Struck, and saved him. Cut him in by 8 o’clock PM. Capt. Destin’s whale. Breeze quite moderate at WSW & NW. Commenced boiling at 8 PM.

Friday, July 18, 1845

Today, moderate breeze at WSW with some rain. Saw a whale about ten AM, and got him. The waist boat, Mr. Lyons. Got him alongside about noon. Cut in the head by sunset, with good weather. Saw three whales today.

Saturday, July 19, 1845

Today, we have very good weather, with a moderate breeze from WSW. Finished cutting at 9 o’clock AM. At 11 o’clock, made sail and steered NW. At 5 PM, saw a ship to the N & W, steering to the southward. Saw no whales today. Shortened sail at 6 PM. Quite a light breeze through the night. Headed to the N & W.

Sunday, July 20, 1845

This day, spoke the ship Henry Thompson of New London, 10 months out, 600 bbls., and the French ship Elisabeth, 1400 bbls. Stowed down 150 bbls. today. Moderate breeze and thick. Steered to the S & E. Saw two dead whales. At night, blows strong with rain from the S & E. Cooled the works down at sunset.

Monday, July 21, 1845

In the morning, blows quite a gale, with much rain and heavy swell from ESE. At 9 AM, moderates. Set the foresail, and started the tryworks. The afternoon calm, with a heavy swell from the SE, and no rain, but foggy. Through the night, blows strong from the N & W. Heading NW.

Tuesday, July 22, 1845

With a strong breeze, and rugged weather from WNW. Heading to the northward, and boiling.

Wednesday, July 23, 1845

Today, quite a light whole sail breeze from SW. Made sail in the forenoon and steered N. Saw two ships to the N & E at 4 P.M. Spoke ship William Tell of Sag Harbour, with five whales this season. Had been to the N & E, but had not seen any whales for a long time. Squalls of thick fog through the day. Finished boiling at 7 PM. The 2 whales turned Up 225 bbls. Latitude at noon 50° 25’ Longitude 162° 22’ E

Thursday, July 24, 1845

This day, strong breeze from WSW, steered NNW. Saw many humpback whale and finbacks, but no right whale. Stowed down 150 bbls. of oil in the after hatch.

Friday, July 25, 1845

This day, moderate breeze at SW steered NNW. Saw three ships. At noon spoke ship John Cockerill of Le Havre, France, 11 months, 600 bbls. At 7 PM, come close upon the ship Neptune of Copenhagen, 19 months out, 2900 bbls. Fog very thick. This ship left the port of Petro Polaske [Petropavlovsk, Kamchatka] yesterday and says we are only 25 miles from land.Tonight, sold two casks of bread to the Neptune.

Saturday, July 26, 1845

After speaking the Neptune and learning of him that there was no whale in shore, we made sail and headed to the S & E. Today, thick fog, and a moderate breeze from South. At 11 o’clock AM, spoke ship Splendid of Cold Spring, with 6 whales. Headed in shore. “Gammed” with her until 4 PM, and stood on to the S & E, or ESE. At 7 PM, shortened sail, fog thick.

Sunday, July 27, 1845

Moderate breeze at SSW, and thick fog until 2 PM. Clears off. Made sail, heading SE. Saw many finbacks. Tacked, headed W. At sunset, shortened sail. Night, very clear. Commenced to blow strong from SW. 

Monday, July 28, 1845

Lay to all day, heading WNW, with a strong gale from SW and clear. Saw two ships heading to the S & E under storm sails. At sunset, moderates. Continues so through the night.

Tuesday, July 29, 1845

In the forenoon, have a moderate breeze from SW. Steered to the W & N. At ten o’clock, tacked ship and headed to the S & E. Saw a ship to the N, steering to the S & E. Afternoon, strong breeze and thick fog, some rain. Shortened sail at 7 PM. At night, blows a gale.

Wednesday, July 30, 1845

In the morning, blows a strong gale from SW, with thick fogg. Made sail at 10 o’clock AM. Moderates gradually. Afternoon, quite moderate, but foggy. At sunset, calm, and lights up. Saw nothing. Carry sail tonight with no wind.

Thursday, July 31, 1845

Today, have a moderate breeze from SW, with spells of clear weather for two or three hours. Saw a bark heading to the N & W. In the afternoon, tacked to the N & W. At 7½ PM, shortened sail. Continued fog through the night. Latitude at noon 50° 54’ Longitude 160° 30’

Friday, August 1, 1845

Made sail at 6 AM, heading west, with a light breeze at SSW. Foggy through the day. In the afternoon, commenced a strong breeze at SSE, and rains. Shortened sail at 5 PM. Saw humpbacks. At night, blows strong, and continues to rain.

Saturday, August 2, 1845

The forenoon, blows strong, with much rain, from SSW. The afternoon at 2 o’clock, lights up, very little. Made sail, heading W by S. Rains and blows and foggy until night. Shortened sail at 8 PM and wore ship, headed ESE. Continues much the same through the night 

Sunday, August 3, 1845

The forenoon is foggy, and some rain, with a strong breeze at SSW. Afternoon, clears off. Made sail at half past one. Wind shifts to SW. Steered WNW. Shortened sail at sunset, and headed SSE. Night, quite moderate and clear.

Monday, August 4, 1845

Have a steady whole sail breeze at WSW. Steered NW. Saw several humpbacks and finbacks. At 9 AM, saw the land, the coast of Asia near Kamchatka. Steered for the land until sunset. Saw 6 ships in shore. The sun sets clear and beautiful. The land mountainous and covered with snow. At night, carried all sail and steered in shore until one o'clock. Came in thick fog, and we headed off shore.

Tuesday, August 5, 1845

The morning, light breeze from NE, and thick fog. At ten o’clock, clears off partially. Saw the land and four ships. Steered for the land. At night, distant from the land 15 miles. Headed off shore with but a light breeze, and calms.

Wednesday, August 6, 1845

In the forenoon, close in with the shore, within three miles. Clear by spells, with a light breeze at S. Run the land along. At 2 PM, entered the mouth of the Bay of Awatska [Avacha], and at 5 o'clock, anchored in the roads of Petropavlovska. The ship Josephine of Sag Harbor, 2700 bbls., Galen of Warren, 1800 bbls., 30 months out, Julius Caesar, New London, 1100 bbls., 12 months, four french whalers, and merchant ship Montreal of Boston, were laying at anchor.

Thursday, August 7, 1845

In the forenoon, had quite a blow from the N & E. Let go the second anchor. Much rain. The afternoon, moderate and pleasant.

Friday, August 8, 1845

This day, fine clear weather in the forenoon. The afternoon, lowery, and moderate breeze from S & E. Each watch have a half day’s liberty, and come off drunk and fighting. Got off and salted 450 salmon, making about 6 bbls. We have a fine view of the mountains which are covered with snow.

Saturday, August 9, 1845

Fine pleasant weather, with light air from the N & W, and clear sky. Got off 800 more salmon, and salted them. Night pleasant.

Sunday, August 10, 1845

At 4 o’clock AM, the weather being fine, with a light breeze from the NW. Called all hand to get underway and go to sea, in company with ships Julius Caesar, Galen, and Josephine. At 2 PM, cleared the land, with a good breeze, and steered ESE, with the wind SSW. Saw several humpbacks, and lowered for one. “No go.”

Monday, August 11, 1845

Blows a gale from SSW and foggy. Lay under short sail, heading SE. Cleared off at 11 AM. Made sail, and steered NNE. Saw the land in the afternoon, and 4 ships. At 9 PM, spoke ships Caledonia, and Dromo, 1600 bbls., bound into Petropavlovska. Short sail. Land distant, 40 miles.

Tuesday, August 12, 1845

The finest weather I have seen for two months, with a light breeze from the westward. Saw 7 ships. Spoke the ship Corinthian of Bristol, R.I., 20 months, 2000 bbls. The captain come on board of us. Afternoon, steered N and saw some finbacks and humpbacks, and saw a bark to the eastward, boiling. Shortened sail at sunset, the land distant, NW 40 miles.

Wednesday, August 13, 1845

This day, fine weather. Kept the land in sight, with its snowy peaks towering above the clouds, with a light breeze from the S & E. Steered along the land to the N & E. Saw the bark seen yesterday. Had some porpoises around the ship at night. Employed cleaning bone this day. Shortened sail at sunset. Calm. Chased a humpback in the morning...

Thursday, August 14, 1845 

Made sail at 4 AM. Light air from the WSW. Saw the bark seen yesterday, in shore of us 15 miles. At 11 o’clock, got a light breeze from SW, and thick fog in squalls. Steered to the eastward with the land in sight. At 4 PM, was off mount, which is very high. The mountains are covered with snow all along this coast. At sunset, shortened sail, heading off shore SSE.

Friday, August 15, 1845

Made sail at 4 AM, and steered NE, with a moderate breeze from SSW. Saw several humpbacks and lowered for one. Come on foggy, gave it up, and kept on to the eastward. Saw 5 ships. Spoke the Levant of Sag Harbour, boiling. Same day, spoke ship Brighton. Latitude 55° N

Saturday, August 16, 1845

Today, blows a moderate gale from SSE. Lay to all day. Saw two ships. The Brighton reports 1000 bbls., 11 months out, and saw whales yesterday.

Sunday, August 17, 1845

In the morning, spoke the ship Brighton again at 8 o’clock. At 9, clears off. Made sail, with a light breeze, heading WSW. In the afternoon, saw two right whales, going quick to the S & W. Chased them, but to no purpose. These are the first we have seen since July 19th. At 8 o’clock, clears off, and saw the land, Mount Kronotskaya [Kronotsky], Kamchatka, bearing N 60 miles distant, covered with snow and very high. At night, headed off to the S & E with a very light breeze and thick fog. At 7½, shortened sail.

Monday, August 18, 1845

This day, moderate airs, and calmed, and fog. Towards night, quite good breeze. Saw a ship to the southward. Saw no right whales this day. Plied to the S & E and SSW. Wind SSE. Saw the land in the afternoon. At night, headed off to the eastward under short sail at 7½ o’clock.

Tuesday, August 19, 1845

Moderate breeze and thick fog from SSE. Saw two whales and chased them, cruising 60 miles off SE from Mount Kronotsky, in Latitude 55° N.

Wednesday, August 20, 1845

This has been a fine, clear and pleasant day, with a light breeze from the N & W in the forenoon. Chased whales from half past 5 AM until 1 PM. Got nothing. Saw several cruised off Mount Kronotsky, ESE, distant 60 miles. Saw a ship to the S, steering to the NE. Latitude at noon 55° 24’ N

Thursday, August 21, 1845 

This day, good weather, with a moderate breeze from NE to SE. Plied to windward all day, but saw no whales. Saw 6 ships off shore Mount Kronotsky, bearing WNW 80 miles. At night, light breeze & foggy. Shortened sail at 7 o'clock.

Friday,  August. 22, 1845  

Thick fog and  light breeze until noon. Made sail and cruised N & E. Saw one whale. Lowered, and got close to him, in company with the boats of the ship William Lee of Newport, with 400 bbls. this season. Saw 6 ships. Afternoon, moderate breeze from S. Shortened sail at 7½ o’clock.

Saturday, August 23, 1845

[Ink image of a whole whale.] 

In the morning, light air, calm, and fog. Saw several right whale at 10 o’clock. Lowered and struck one, and saved him. Cut him in in the afternoon. Rain and strong breeze from N. Finished cutting at 6½ PM. Starboard quarter boats caught the whale.

Sunday, August 24,1845

Commenced boiling at 5 AM. Weather moderate but cloudy, and squalls of fog and wind. Saw a ship to the N chasing whales. Made sail at 9 o’clock. Saw several whales and lowered our boats twice in the afternoon. Got nothing. Wind strong from N. Saw the land, bearing NNW, 80 miles distant. Shortened sail at 7 o’clock. Heading E. Latitude at noon 55° 12’ N 

Monday, August 25, 1845

Moderate breeze and squalls of thick fog from N. Saw three ships. Saw plenty of finbacks. Saw one ship, supposed the Nantasket. At night, carried sail with a light breeze from WNW. At 9 PM, shifts to N and freshens with foggy squalls.

Tuesday, August 26, 1845

This day, strong breeze from NE. Headed to the N & W. Shortened sail at 7 o’clock AM.  Saw three ships. Finished boiling at 1 PM. Turned up 100 bbls. At night, moderates.

Wednesday, August 27, 1845

This day commences with rain, fog and strong breeze from NNE. At 8 o’clock AM, moderates. Commenced stowing down. Made sail. Saw one ship and several finbacks. Finished stowing at 5 PM. Blowing strong. Shortened sail. Stowed in the after hatch, starboard side. Night, thick fog, and rain.

Thursday, August 28, 1845

The forenoon, moderate breeze from NNE. Cruised to the E & NW. Made sail at 6 AM. Afternoon at 4 o’clock, saw the land. At 5, blows strong and foggy. At 6, shortened sail, heading E by N. Larboard tacked aboard.

Friday, August 29, 1845

The forenoon, foggy and rain squalls, with a moderate breeze from NNE. Made sail at 10 o’clock AM, heading NW. The afternoon, quite good weather, with a moderate breeze. Saw the land at 3 o’clock PM, bearing NW. At night, the wind light, with clear weather. The wind shifts to SW. Steered N.

Saturday, August 30, 1845

This day, fine, clear weather, and a light breeze from SW. Steered to the N & E. Saw 5 ships and several whale. Chased three. Got nothing. At sunset spoke ship Midas of New Bedford, saw two ships take whales and cutting, heard from the Louvre 1500 bbls., Charles Phelps 4 whale, Dromo 1300, Corvo 1500. Saw same day, bark Richmond, of Providence. Midas reports, the Hopewell and Luminary to windward with whales. At sunset, shortened sail off Mount Kronotsky.

Sunday, August 31, 1845

Great success today. In the morning, calm. Saw two whales, and lowered for them at 7 o’clock. Got none. At 9 o'clock, lowered for three more, in company with the boat of ship Midas. Got none. Half past 9, lowered, with a light breeze from NW. Three whales, 2 miles to windward. Pulled up and struck two, very large. Afternoon, calm until 3 o'clock. Killed the two whales, and got them alongside at 5 PM. Commenced cutting. Calm during the night. Six ships in sight. At 3 o'clock AM, a little rain.

Monday, September 1, 1845

Commenced cutting at 5 AM. Calm all day. Saw several ships and some whales. Two ships, boiling. Calm at night. Finished cutting at 9 o’clock PM. Commenced boiling at 10 o’clock PM. Whales very fat, and both cows. At 3 AM, a little rain.

Tuesday, September 2, 1845

At daylight in the morning, calm. Saw 6 ships, and 3 boiling.

Wednesday, September 3, 1845

Fine pleasant weather, and a gentle breeze from NNE. Early in the morning, lowered and struck a whale. Held on to him 3 hours. I had to cut from him. He got cunning and would not let a boat haul up to him before he would go down. In the afternoon, run in close to the land, to the southward of the bay. Saw two more whales. Three ships not far off. At night, had fine, clear weather and a light breeze. Steered to the N & E, close in to the land.

Thursday, September 4, 1845

Beautiful weather and a light breeze. Spoke ship Jefferson, Capt. Harris, 12½ months out, 1100 bbls., has not got a whale for two months. Stowed down today 140 bbls. in the forehold. Afternoon, Capt. Destin got stoven by a whale, but did not.

Friday, September 5, 1845

Last night, stood off shore, with a moderate breeze from SSE & S. Today, thick fog in the morning since 10 o’clock. Shortened sail at 5 AM, heading ESE. Continues blowing and fog through the day. At 11 o’clock PM, clears off and moderates.  

Saturday, September 6, 1845

Fine weather, with a light breeze from the northward. Steered WNW. Stowed down 120 bbls. of oil. Chased whales, but got nothing. Saw one ship, just at night, close in to the land. At sunset, headed off shore and shortened sail.

Sunday, September 7, 1845

Light breeze with but little fog. Chased whales 5 times today, and got nothing. Spoke ship Italy, Sag Harbor, 700 bbls. Finished boiling at 1 o’clock PM. The two whales taken last Sunday turned up 400 bbls. Saw six ships today, and spoke the ship Brighton’s boats, one whale since we spoke them last. At night, headed in shore. Wind light at SSE.

Monday, September 8, 1845

Calm and pleasant. Stowed down 180 bbls. of oil today. Chased whales twice. Got none. The head of the bay, ten miles off. Saw several ships. At night, light air from NW. Steered ENE.

Tuesday, September 9, 1845

This day, good whole sail breeze. Saw one whale. Saw several ships. Afternoon, spoke and “gammed” with the Jefferson. At night, thick weather, with a strong breeze at E with rain. Carried double reefed topsails, heading SSE & NNE.

Wednesday, September 10, 1845

Strong breeze and bad, rainy, thick weather. Steered SE, wind ENE. Saw one ship. No whales seen this day.

Thursday, September 11, 1845

Moderate breeze. Run in for the land. At 4 PM close in to the SW head of the bay. Towards night, calm. Chased whales, got none. Ten o’clock, light air from the S, steered N until 3 AM, then NNW. Fine, clear weather, and good breeze. Saw two ships, boiling.

Friday, September 12, 1845

Fine, clear weather. Forenoon, calm. Five ships in sight, and two a boiling. In the afternoon, I saw plenty of whales, and chased three times. No success. Run well into the bay. Shortened sail at sunset and headed off shore. Saw the Jefferson chasing whales. Night, moderate.

Saturday, September 13, 1845

Strong breeze from the S & SE. Run in towards the west part of the bay. Saw two whales. Chased one. Afternoon, stood off shore, breeze light at E & NE & N. Steered N. Rain & thick weather. At 7 o’clock, shortened sail. Night, clear & pleasant. Saw two ships boiling. Also saw the Jefferson in the morning, running off.

Sunday, September 14, 1845

Fine, clear weather, with a light breeze. Saw 4 ships, 3 to the N & E, and the Jefferson to the westward, chasing whales, and passed near us, steering to the N & E. Afternoon, saw plenty of whales near the land. Got fast to one, and Capt. Destin lost his line. At sunset, headed off ESE, and shortened sail. Night, moderate and clear weather. Latitude at noon (by obs.) 56° 13’ N

Monday, September 15, 1845

This day, have fine weather. Run in towards the land at the west part of the bay. Within about 10 miles of the shore, saw one whale and chased him. Lost sight of him, and came on board. Tacked ship and stood off to the N & E until sunset. Saw three ships to the eastward. Shortened sail.

Tuesday, September 16, 1845

This day, have fine, light, pleasant weather. Made sail at 5 o’clock AM. Lowered for a whale at half past 5, going quick. Chased one hour and gave him up. Steered to the N & E. Saw six ships, three boiling. Afternoon, saw more whales. Chased one. At sunset, spoke ship Jefferson, had got nothing. Breeze light at S & W. Off the north head of the bay, distant from the land 15 miles. At night, steered NE. Carried sail.

Wednesday, September 17, 1845

Fine, clear weather. Breeze very light at the northward. Saw 4 ships boiling and three not boiling. Saw several whales and chased three times. No success. Afternoon, saw the Jefferson take a whale. At night, calms, and light air. Steered to the E.

Thursday September 18, 1845

Fine weather. Steered to the N & W. Saw numbers of fin & humpbacks. Afternoon, moderate breeze. Steered in for the land. Saw two ships, cutting. At 3 o’clock, lowered and took a whale. At night, lay by the whale. Strong breeze & clear.

Friday, September 19, 1845

In the morning, have a strong breeze. Could not cut. At 8 o’clock, moderates. Commenced cutting. At ten o’clock, spoke ship Jefferson and ship Brighton, both boiling. Finished cutting at sunset. Night clear and pleasant, breeze light. Steered WNW, and commenced boiling at 6 PM.

Saturday, September 20, 1845

In the forenoon, calm. At 8 o’clock AM, saw 4 whales. Lowered and struck and killed two. At 4 PM, got one alongside. Sprung up a breeze and could not get the other one to the ship. At night, strong breeze from NW. Lay by the whale In two boats all night. Very cold, but clear. At 10 o’clock PM, ship to leeward 5 miles.

Sunday, September 21, 1845

This day, fine weather. At daylight in the morning, could not see the ship from the boats. At a half hour after sunrise, let go of the whale and run to leeward for the ship. Run an hour and saw her distant 15 miles. Got on board at 10 o’clock, wet, cold and tired. Spoke today ships Brighton, 1400, Ann and Susan, Helvetia 1500, Midas 1200. Afternoon, cut in the whale saved. Calm, night pleasant.

Monday, September 22, 1845

This day, fine, clear, pleasant weather, with a light breeze from the S & W. Steered to the N. Stowed down 180 bbls. of oil. This day, felt the shock of an earthquake. At night, pleasant and clear. Steered to the N.

Tuesday, September 23, 1845

Today, light airs and calm. Spoke the ship Midas of New Bedford and got the craft [cunning skill] out of the whale that we lost, and they got the same day, and was a boiling. Spoke today bark Richmond of Providence, RI, 1400 bbls., also ship Brighton, and ship Lucy Ann of Greenport, Long Island, 1000. Several other ships in sight. Saw no whales. Cruised to the N.

Wednesday, September 24, 1845

Fine weather. Saw several whales, and lowered twice. No success. Several ships in sight. Stowed down 100 bbls. in the after hatch. Finished boiling at 4 o’clock PM. Cruised to the southward, breeze moderate.

Thursday, September 25, 1845

Fine pleasant weather, and a light breeze from the S & W. Stood in near the land and went on shore with two boats. Saw one whale. Near night, cruised to the southward. Saw 3 ships, off shore.

Friday, September 26, 1845

Fine, pleasant weather, and calm. Saw and chased two whales. Did not get hold of them.  Saw three ships off shore today near the land. Distant, 12 miles. Cruised to the S at night. Carry sail.

Saturday, September 27, 1845

In the morning, calm. At 10 o’clock AM, light breeze at N. Saw some finbacks. Also, two ships to the northward. Afternoon, moderate breeze to the eastward. Steered WSW. Saw one whale going quick to the N. Lowered for him, but to no purpose. Steered SSE. Distant from the land, 30 miles, off the north head of the bay. At night, light breezes and calm. Carried moderate sail, heading to the southward.

Sunday, September 28, 1845

In the morning, quite a light breeze from ESE. Made all sail at daylight, and steered S. At 9 AM, strong breeze. Tacked, and headed ENE. Saw two whales at noon. Weather getting bad. Did not lower our boats. Blows fresh. Steered NE, wind ESE. Trying to clear the land. At 4 PM, double reefed the topsails. At 6, wore ship, headed to the SSE. Night blows strong & the sea rough.

Monday, September 29, 1845

At daylight in the morning, took in all sail but storm sails. Continues blowing all day. At night, moderates. Saw the south head of the bay, distant 40 miles, bearing WSW. Saw no whales this day. 

Tuesday, September 30, 1845

At daylight in the morning, made sail and stood in towards the land, to the southward of the bay. Stowed down 40 bbls of oil. At noon, within 15 miles of the land, which is covered with snow, which has fallen in the last two days. Blows strong, and is cold. Saw no right whales today.

Wednesday, October 1,1845

At daylight, make all sail. Wind light, in squalls all around the compass. Afternoon, steered to the S & W, wind a gentle breeze from E. Distant from the land, 30 miles. At noon, lowered the boats and chased a humpback. At sunset, shortened sail. Distant from the land, 60 miles. Saw no right whales this day. 

Thursday, October 2, 1845

At daylight, made sail, with a strong breeze and squall from NE Steered S. Saw a bark laying to, and afterwards saw her keep off [to shift away from  going close to or alongside the land, or from staying close to the wind] and steer SW. At sunset, blowing a strong gale. Hove to for the night. Weather bad and rainy.

Friday, October 3, 1845

At daylight, kept off. Weather more moderate. Steered S by E. Afternoon, quite moderate. Steered SSW under all sail, wind N. Carried sail through the night. Bound off the Ground. Wind N. 

Saturday, October 4, 1845

Moderate through the day, with a whole sail breeze at ESE & NE & E. Steered SW & WSW and S by W & S. At night, blows a gale and heavy rain from ESE. At 2 AM, cleared off, and the wind shifts to SW, and moderates. Wore ship, and headed SSE. 

Sunday, October 5, 1845

At 6 AM, made sail and steered ESE, with a strong breeze at SW and clear. Afternoon, hazy. At night, clear and quite moderate. Steered E, carrying all sail.

Monday, October 6, 1845

The forenoon, moderate, and a steady breeze at S. Steered E by S. Afternoon, squalley, reduced sail. At night, wind shifted to SW, made all sail. Steered SE. Strong breeze.

Tuesday, October 7, 1845

Strong breeze at W, steered ESE, carrying all sail. Latitude (by obs.) 46° 20’ Longitude

Thursday, October 9, 1845

This day and yesterday, fine, pleasant weather, with a light breeze from W. Course SE by E.  Latitude at noon 42° 55’ N

Friday, October 10, 1845

This day, have a strong breeze from S. Steered E. At night, blows a gale with rain. Lay to.

Saturday, October 11, 1845

The gale raged until 11 o’clock AM, then died away and shifted to NW, leaving a heavy swell and clear weather. Steered E by S.

Sunday, October 12, 1845

Fine weather, with a light breeze at SW. At 1 o’clock PM, had a squall of wind and rain, with a shift of wind to W.  Steering E by S.

Friday October 31, 1845

At daylight AM, the island of Maui “all high,” distant 15 miles, closely enveloped in a thick cloud and fog. With a strong trade wind, doubled the west cape by 9 o’clock and got becalmed. Down boats, and towed into the anchorage about 3 PM. Thirty-five ships and barks then in port at Lahaina.

Saturday, November 1, 1845

Fine, light weather. One watch, liberty on shore. Sailed, ship Helen of Sag Harbour, for home with 4500 bbls. of oil. By her, I wrote to my wife. Also on a cruise, Henry Thompson, Commodore Perry, and Ninus, Ohio, and others.

Sunday, November 2, 1845

Fine weather. Larboard watch, liberty on shore.

Monday, November 3, 1845  

Employed today getting off potatoes and landing fish, etc.

Tuesday, November 4, 1845

At sunrise, got under way, bound down to Oahu. Breeze, light and calm. Made slow progress. Sent a letter to Olive by the brig Bull.

Wednesday, November 5, 1845

Light air and calm, from the westward. The shipping in sight at Lahaina  I landed on the Island of Molokai, and sold a barrel of oil for 9 barrels of sweet potatoes. At night, took a fine breeze from N, and arrived off Diamond Head at 2 o'clock AM.

Thursday, November 6, 1845

At 9 o'clock AM, came to anchor in the outer roads of Honolulu. Arrived same time ship Columbia, Capt. Kelley, of New London, 2400 bbls.

Friday, November 7, 1845

Outer roads of Honolulu. Arrived, ship Jefferson, Capt. Harris, New London, 1500 whale. Sailed, Caledonia, for home. Sent a letter by her to Matilda Thompson by George Thompson.

Saturday, November 8, 1845

At sunrise, got under way. Stood in to the inner harbor. Got moored inside by 9 o’clock AM. Sailed, ship California, of and for New Bedford, 30 months out, 3100 bbls. of sperm. Come in same time, ship Columbia. Starboard watch, shore on liberty. Found about 30 sail at this port.

Sunday, November 9, 1845

I have the pleasure and privilege of attending church. In the morning, the native (Kings Chapel) church. And also at 11 o'clock, the Seaman’s Chapel. In the afternoon, visited the Nuʻuanu Cemetery. In the evening, attended service at the Seaman’s Chapel again.

Tuesday November 11, 1845

I attended the Lecture at the Seaman’s Chapel in the eve.

Sunday, November 16, 1845

During the week, we had watch and watch alternately on shore, and painted ship, and got off our water. Two men have been discharged, and one ran away. Ships have continued to arrive and sail daily. This morning the U.S. Frigate Constitution [1844 - 1846: Sails a total of 52,370.5 miles during World Cruise] arrived and anchored in the outer roads, 50 days from Canton. Sailed today, ship Hannibal, for New London, by which I send letters. In the evening, went and saw several men who belong to the State’s brig: Gardner, Shields, Anderson, and others.

Wednesday, November 19, 1845

This morning at 5 o’clock, the steward ran away. At noon, got under way, and came out to sea. The captain remained to finish his business. At 3 PM, the boat came off with one man missing. The captain remained all night. We lay off and on all night.

Thursday, November 20, 1845

At 9 o’clock AM, boat went in and brought off the captain and the missing man. Made sail and steered S, with a steady breeze at NE, etc.

Friday, November 21, 1845

[On-line map of journey starts with this day.]

Sunday, November 23, 1845

Continues fine, pleasant weather and light trade winds. Steered southerly.

Tuesday, December 30, 1845

This day, had some words with the Chief Mate who made complaint to the captain, and I was ordered below, off duty.

Since November the 23rd, we have cruised southerly and westerly to the line in a Longitude 160° W, and from thence northerly and westerly to Latitude 14° N, and thence westerly. Today, in 164° E Longitude, and steering WSW, with fine weather. Coopering provisions.

Monday, January 5, 1846

With a Strong NE trade wind, and under all sail, steering W. At half past 2 o’clock PM, saw the island of Guam, bearing NW, distant 25 miles. Took in studding sails, and hauled up NNW. At night, headed to the S & E. In Latitude 13° 20’ N, Longitude 146° 24’ E.

Tuesday, January 6, 1846

At sunrise, have the island, bearing WNW. Passed to the eastward of it, and saw another to  the northward, distant about 20 miles. Steered along the N & W side to the S & W. At one o'clock PM, come abreast of the harbor, and got a pilot at 2 o'clock, and passed within the reef, and anchored at about 4 o'clock in a large bay, called Apra.

Wednesday, January 7, 1846

Today, Capt. Destin went on shore to go to the city, 7 miles back. Employed breaking out the cargo and coopering. Weather rainy.

Thursday, January 8, 1846

All hands employed coopering the cargo. Weather fine. At noon, the captain returned on board. In the afternoon, he informed me that he would give me my discharge here.

Tuesday, January 27, 1846

At 9 o’clock AM, left Apra Bay for Umata [Umatac] to water the ship, with a moderate breeze. Anchored at Umatac at 12 at noon, within a cable’s length of the shore. Here is no town as I can see. There is three or four houses upon the beach, and a fort upon the hill close to the seashore overlooking the buildings below.

Saturday, January 31, 1846

Yesterday, finished getting water at 2 o’clock PM. We have taken on board over 300 bbls. since Tuesday. At 3 PM, have up our anchor, made sail, and stood to the NW. At 8 o’clock PM, we were off Apra Bay. This morning, stood in for Apra, and the captain of the port came off at 9 o’clock and Capt. Destin went in with his boat to the ship Jefferson. At Umatac are a plenty of oranges and good and cheap water, handy and easy to get, and good and plenty,  some pigs, etc. 

The ships Empire of Nantucket and Jefferson of New London are yet laying in Apra Bay. At 11 o’clock, the captain returned on board, and we steered to the northward. At sunset, the island of Guam distant SE, 25 miles. Breeze strong from ENE. Thus, we are at sea again, and bound now direct for the whale ground off Kamchatka. The cold chills begin to come over me at the very thought. The island of Guam is not high. Not more so than the southern part of the state of Connecticut. I should think 60 mile long from NE to SW, and 20 broad. The soil very fertile, producing oranges, bananas, limes, lemons, yams, sweet potatoes, etc. The yams are very fine, but the sweet potatoes are not good. There are about 8000 inhabitants on the island, mostly very poor, being governed by the Spanish tyranny, and priest ridden by the church. These islands were discovered by the Spaniards about two hundred years ago, and were first subdued by Jesuits, who established missions upon them, and reduced the natives to slavery. There are several of these islands in the group, and are called the Marianas, under a Spanish governor, at Guam, the principal.

Sunday, February 1, 1846

This day, have strong NE trades. Steered to the N. Weather clear. double reefed topsails. 

This day at 11 AM, Capt. Destin requested to know of me whether I wished him to put somebody in my place, as he was now going on to the whaling ground. I replied that he could do as he saw fit and proper about that. I had done my duty as 3rd Mate, of the which he could not deny, and I felt competent to do it. But, as to being imposed upon, as I had been, I should not endure it. After much talk and recapitulation, I agreed to go to duty, and to be in the starboard watch. At 12 o’clock at noon, returned to duty, after being off since December the 30th, 1845, one week before we arrived at Apra, Guam.

Monday, February 2, 1846

Continues steady breeze from ENE. Steered by the wind to the northward under double reefed topsails and coursers. Main topsail unbent for repairs. Weather, fine.

Tuesday, February 3, 1846

This day, fine weather, with light breeze at ENE. Steered N under all sail. I painted the bow boat this day.

Sunday, February 8, 1846

The weather has been fine with light winds and calms. Since Tuesday the 3rd to today, have a light air from WNW, steering N. Yesterday and today, see a quantity of pumice stone, and have picked up over a barrel of it. We have been employed the past week in repairing sails, and fitting cutting pendants, and getting them aloft, etc. Latitude (by obs.) 22° 18’ N  Longitude 140° 48’ E

Sunday, February 15, 1846

The weather has been light and pleasant, but chilly at night. Saturday, had a moderate gale from ENE. Lay to under closed sail. This morning at day light, made all sail, with a light breeze at N, heading WNW. At 7 AM, shifts to NW, and blows strong in flows. Wore, and steered NNE at noon, under double reefed topsails, the sky clear. At 3 PM, kept off to NE, with the wind two points free. Latitude at noon 27° 54’ N Longitude at 2½ PM 138° E

Sunday, February 22, 1846

This day, moderately strong breeze from NNW. Steering NE under double reefed topsails and gib and courses, the weather quite cold, and the sky cloudy. Since Monday the 16th, we have had strong squally weather, with rain and hail, and three days strong gale from the W and N & W. Thursday the 19th, passed near a small island. Quite high. Saw numbers of birds, mallemuck and albatross. The next day, weather moderate. Made all sail. At sunset, saw another small peak to the westward. At sunset this evening, shortened sail, with quite moderate weather, and wore ship, heading WNW, wind light at N. So ends the 22nd.

Monday February 23, 1846

All hands at daylight to make sail. Moderate breeze at N in squalls, heading NW by W. This day, quite pleasant, and ends fine and nearly a calm. Employed over hauling the windlass and repairing sails, making spun yarn, send down the fore top gallant yard, and running rigging, etc. At sunset, shortened sail. Capt. Destin and Henry Holt have a quarrel. Capt. Destin called him and Mr. Lyons damned liars etc. So ends.

Tuesday, February 24, 1846

The forenoon, fine light weather. Made all sail at 6 o’clock AM, with a light breeze at W. Heading NNW. Afternoon, light squalls of rain. The officers commenced standing mastheads. At 6 PM, shortened sail. Nearly a calm. Steered N. Night, moderate with rain.

Wednesday, February 25, 1846

All hands at daylight made sail, with a light breeze at SW. Steered N. Breeze increased to a gale, with heavy rain by noon. Took in all sail, and hove to, heading SSE. Afternoon, wore, and headed WNW, with a heavy sea. Very near loading our boats. Night, continues blowing. Towards morning, moderates.

Thursday, February 26, 1846

All hand at daylight to make sail, with moderate weather, and breeze at WSW. Steered N. Increases, and at noon, blows a gale. Shortened sail, and hove to. Afternoon, shift suddenly to N, with a tremendous bad sea. Ship heading ENE. Large flock of birds, albatross, about the ship. Night, continues a strong gale, with flights of rain, snow and hail.

Friday, February 28, 1846

The gale abates, and we have quite fine weather, but a heavy swell. Employed repairing sails and rigging, and various other jobs, and bent the cotton foresail. We made sail at 10 AM, and shortened sail at 6 PM. Breeze light at NW, and clear weather. Put up our stoves today, forward and aft. Night remains moderate with some rain. Wind from the southward, and light.

Sunday, March 1, 1846

This day, light breeze from the N, and cloudy, and some rain. Made sail at 7 AM. Shortened sail at half-past five PM.

Monday, March 2, 1846

During the night, commenced a gale from N, and rain and cold. Blows all day, strong. At 6 AM, furled the main topsail, and lay under the fore and main spencers. Afternoon, moderates a little. At 4 PM, set the main topsail, double reefed, heading ENE. At night, strong squalls of wind, with rain, some hail, and snow, from NW.

Tuesday, March 3, 1846

This day, moderate. At 8 o’clock AM, made sail. Wind light, with strong squalls and some rain from NW. Ship heading NNE under double reefed topsails and courses. At 6 PM, shortened sail. At night, light airs, and calm.

Wednesday, March 4, 1846

In the forenoon, calm and rain. Afternoon, fresh breeze from NNE. Steered NW. At 6 AM, made sail. At 4 PM, reefed topsails. At 6 PM, took in all sail, but close-reefed main topsail and fore spencer. The night remains good, pleasant weather, and but a light breeze.

Thursday, March 5, 1846

At 6 o’clock AM, all hands to make sail. Weather light and sea smooth. At 8 o’clock, saw two right whales. lowered the boats, and chased two miles. Going quick, to the N & E. Could not get near them. The weather remains light and good through the day. At 6 PM, shortened sail. Breeze light from the N & E. Steered to the N & W.

Friday, March 6, 1846

At 3 o’clock AM, commenced a strong breeze from NE. At 6 o'clock AM, furled the fore sail and close-reefed the main topsail. Latitude at noon 35° 20’ N  Longitude 141° 10’ E

Saturday, March 7, 1846

All hands at 6 AM and made all sail, with light weather. Through the day, light winds, calms and squalls at the northward and westward. Steering to the northward. At 6 PM, shortened sail and wore ship, and headed WSW. Night, continues very light weather.

Sunday, March 8, 1846

Made all sail at sunrise, with a light breeze at N. At 9 o’clock AM, commenced pumping ship and found much oil. Broke out the hold and found several casks empty and partly empty. At 6 PM, shortened sail, with light, pleasant weather, and three hundred bbls. of oil on deck. In Breaking out the casks, it was found that they were not properly stowed, and badly coopered. Weather at night, good.

Monday, March 9, 1846

Called all hands at 5½ AM and made all sail, with a light breeze at SE, and fine, pleasant weather. Kept off, and steered NW. Saw two right whales going fast to the S & E. Commenced stowing down the oil. Saw several finbacks. At 4 o’clock, blows a gale from ESE. Took in all sail, heading S, with rain. Stowed down 120 bbls. of oil. Strong gale through the night.

Tuesday, March 10, 1846

This day in the morning, blows strong from S, with a heavy cross sea and much rain. At 10 AM, the wind lulls and shifts to NW, with a very bad sea. Made sail, and steered to the N & E last night. At 4 o’clock AM, James Thompson got hurt with the wheel.

Wednesday, March 11, 1846

All hands at half past five AM, and made all sail, with good weather, and a light breeze from NE. Employed today stowing down oil, and finished at 5 o’clock PM. Saw some finbacks today. Steered NNW, with a light breeze from W. Last 10 bbls. out of 250 in leakage. At night, carrying all sail. At night, pleasant weather.

Thursday, March 12, 1846

At sunrise, strong breeze at SW. Steered SW, double reefed topsails. Afternoon, blows a gale. At 2 o’clock, close-reefed main topsail, and hove to. Ship very wet.

Friday, March 13, 1846

This day, continues a heavy gale from W, and cold, with squalls of rain, hail and snow. Boats stoven on the cranes. Weather very bad. At night, the weather continues much the same.

Saturday, March 14, 1846

This day, blows strong, and dry weather, with the wind at NW. Afternoon, quite moderate. Latitude at noon (by obs.) 36° 14’ N. During the night, moderates, and we make sail.

Sunday, March 15, 1846

At sunrise, moderately good weather, with a good whole sail breeze at S. Made all sail, and · steered WNW. Afternoon, strong breeze, and much rain. At sunset, close-reefed the topsails,  and furled the jib and main sail. Steering NW by W. Through the night, quite moderate, the wind shifts to WNW & NW. No rain after 9 o’clock PM.

Monday, March 16, 1846

This day commences with fine weather, and a light breeze from NW, heading NNS. Made all sail at 6 AM. At noon, had a squall from about W. The wind has gone entirely around the compass today. At 4 PM, took in all sail, with a strong breeze from NW. Ship heading N. Employed this day repairing main and mizzen top sails, and boats. At night, blows strong in frequent squalls, and dry weather.

Tuesday, March 17, 1846

The morning, moderate. Made sail, double reefed top sails and courses. Ship, by the wind, heading NNE. Wind NW. Afternoon, blows heavy in squalls, with hail, rain and snow. At one PM, shortened sail. At sunset, took in the foresail. Weather, very cold. At 11 o’clock at night, had several very heavy squalls. Carried away a main topsail sheet. Called all hands to furl it, and turn up the starboard boat.

Wednesday, March 18, 1846

Blows a heavy gale. At 8 o'clock AM, the ship cut water, and head was found to be off. Cleared away and took it on deck. Towards night, the weather moderates, and we set the main topsail close-reefed. Through the night, moderate. 

Thursday, March 19, 1846

All hands, and made sail at 6 o'clock AM, with strong breeze, and increasing with rain from SE. At 8 o'clock, blows strong, and much rain. Took in all sail and hove to. The remainder of the day, lay to. Wind all around.

Friday, March 20, 1846

This day, we are laying to under main spencer, in a strong gale from NW, with heavy squalls of hail and snow. Last night at 12 o'clock, main topsail sheet parted, and all hands were called to furl it.

Saturday, March 21, 1846

The gale continues, with light squalls of snow. Fore and main spencers are all the sails we have set. Weather, very cold. Ship heading NNE. Latitude 38° N (by obs.)

Sunday, March 22, 1846

The weather, moderate. Made sail at 6 o’clock AM. Heading NNE, under double reefed topsails. Squalls of snow through the day. In the afternoon, saw 2 whales. Employed repairing sails. Weather cold.  Latitude at noon (by obs.) 39° 16’ N

Monday, March 23, 1846

We have good weather, with a very light breeze from NNW. Heading NE. The fore topsail on deck, repairing. Shortened sail at sunset. Fine weather through the night, with a light breeze at W & SW.

Tuesday, March 24, 1846

This day, we have very fine weather, with a light breeze from W. Steered NNW. Afternoon, bent the fore topsail and unbent the main. At 5 PM, bent it again. Also, employed repairing the rudder, which was found to be lame [disabled]. At sunset, shortened sail.

Wednesday, March 25, 1846

Saw four large whales, and chased them, and ran over them with the ship. Fine weather. Latitude 39° 05’ N

Thursday, March 26, 1846

The past night, we had a strong breeze at SSE, and clear weather. Made sail at 8 o’clock AM, and steered NW, with a strong breeze at S, and thick and rainy in the afternoon. Shortened sail at half past five PM, and hove to, under close-reefed main topsail, heading SW. At 8 o’clock, the wind shifts to NW and, in course of the night, to N.

Friday, March 27, 1846

Made sail at 7 AM, and steered WNW, with a strong breeze from the N, and cold. Afternoon, calm. Shortened sail at 5 PM.

Saturday, March 28, 1846

Made all sail at 6 o'clock AM, and steered WNW, with a light breeze from SE, and rain.  Afternoon, shifts suddenly to NW, and blows strong. Shortened sail at 1 o’clock. At 6 PM, wind at N. Ship heading WNW. During the night, the wind hauls to about W, and blows strong.

Sunday, March 29, 1846

This day, we have a strong breeze from W, and clear, and cold. Made no sail. Ship heading SSW, close-reefed main topsail and fore spencer set. Continues blowing through the night, with snow and hail.

Monday, March 30, 1986

The weather continues blowey, with squalls of hail and snow. Otherwise, clear and moderately cold. The ship is laying to under close-reefed main topsail and fore spencer. All hands employed at idleness. Blows strong through the night.

Tuesday, March 31, 1846

Moderates. Made sail at 2 PM [missing section of page]

Wednesday, April 1, 1846

Made all sail at half past five, and steered WNW, with a light breeze at S. Afternoon, strong wholesale breeze at SE. Steered NW. Shortened sail at half past six PM, and run under a close-reefed main topsail, steering NW. This day, good weather, but no whales, but finbacks. Blows a gale until 12 at night. Latitude 35° 20’ N Longitude 148° 37’ E

Thursday, April 2, 1846

Made all sail at half past five AM, with a very light wind, and heavy swell, and thick fog. The wind shifts to N at 9 o’clock, and a moderate breeze. Shortened sail. At 1 o’clock, continues foggy until 4 o’clock PM, clears up. Tonight, we are in very dark colored water. At sunset, good, clear weather. Moderate breeze at N. Ship heading WNW under close-reefed main topsail and foresail and spencers and fore top stay sail. Pleasant through the night, and very cold.

Friday, April 3, 1846

Made all sail at 5½ o’clock AM, with a light breeze at N, and cold, and a plenty of frost. Sea smooth. Remained fine weather through the day. Saw and chased whales three times. Very shy. Got nothing. At sunset, clear and calm. Ship under double reefed topsails and courses, heading NNW. Night continues calm. Latitude at noon (by obs.) 39° 55’ N Longitude (by distance) at 2 PM 145° 27’

Saturday, April 4, 1846

Made all sail at 5½ o’clock AM, with calm weather. Through the day, a very light air from the southward. Saw one whale in the forenoon, and chased him 4 hours, and gave him up. In the afternoon, saw several more, and chased them 3 hours. Could not get hold of them. At sunset, whales a plenty in all directions, and some near the ship. Shortened sail, with light air.

Sunday, April 5, 1846

Made all sail at daylight, with a light breeze to the SSW. At sunrise, wore ship, and steered E by S. At half past 8 o’clock AM, saw whales. At 10 o’clock, lowered our boats, and struck two. Bow boat got stove, and capsized. Saved one whale, and cut him in by sunset. Frederick Olney [the author of this journal] hurt today. Latitude (by obs.) 39° 59’ N Longitude (by chronometer) 46° 52’

Monday, April 6, 1846

This day, blows strong from S & E, with  thick fog and rain. Could not boil. Ship hove to, heading to the N & E.

Tuesday, April 7, 1846

This day, foggy, and a moderate breeze at the N & W. Ship heading to the W. Commenced to boil this morning again. But little rain today. When my boat got turned over by the whale on Sunday, I got hurt in my neck and head. Today, I am better.

Wednesday, April 8, 1846

Today, we have light airs, and variable, with thick fog, and calm, etc. Continued boiling and steering to the westward. I am nearly recovered from my hurt. At night, clears off, with a light breeze at N. Steered WNW.

Thursday, April 9, 1846

This day, we have fine weather, with a light breeze at N. Steering to the N & W and N & E. Saw two whales at 8 o’clock AM, and chased them. Employed stowing down oil. Afternoon, saw as many as 20 whales, and struck one. Three boats, and all got loose, and the whale got away from them. At sunset, weather fine. Whales a plenty, heading NE. Latitude at noon 39° 43’ Longitude

Friday, April 10, 1846 

Made all sail at 5½ o’clock AM, with a light breeze at NNW. Steered NE. Saw some finbacks in the forenoon. Afternoon, saw 5 right whales, going quick. Gave chase, but could not get up with them. Calm. Stowed down 100 bbls. of oil. Shortened sail at sunset. Cruised to the N & E. Repaired the bow boat. Clear and pleasant through the night. Sow had nine pigs.

Saturday, April 11, 1846

At daylight, fine weather. Made all sail, with a light breeze at SSW. And, to the westward, whales in sight, going to the S & E, quick. Chased them one rising. Cruised to the W. Saw a whale at 10 o’clock. Chased him one rising. Cruised to the N & E with a strong breeze. And, afternoon at 3 o’clock, took in all sail, heading W. Blows strong. Killed the last hog. Henry Holt sick, off duty. Latitude at noon 39° 44’ N. I am not able to do duty. Lowered my boat today. My shoulder and neck is yet lame.

Sunday, April 12, 1846

Made no sail this day. Have fog and rain, with a moderate breeze to the southward. Shifts, towards evening, to N. Ship heading to the N and to the eastward. Henry Holt sick, off duty. Moderate to good weather in the night.

Monday, April 13, 1846

Made all sail at sunrise, with good weather, and a light breeze at NE. Steered to the ESE. Saw two whales. Wore ship at 1 o’clock and steered NNW. At 4 PM, saw two whales. At 5, lowered. Got a dart at them twice. Missed. Bow boat. Sunset, come on board. Shortened sail. Breeze light at NE. Several whales in sight to windward. Latitude at noon 39° 24’ N. Henry Holt on duty. 

Tuesday, April 14, 1846

Made all sail at daylight, with a light breeze at NE. Cruised to the SE. Saw two whales, going quick to the N & E. Tacked ship, and steered to the N & W. Wind shifts to E. Steered NNE & NE. Afternoon, light air, and calm. Sent up the fore top gallant yard and sail. Shortened sail at sunset. Night, light weather.

Wednesday, April 15, 1846

Morning, thick fog. Made sail at 7½ o’clock AM, and steered ENE, with a light breeze at SW. At noon, light up for an hour, then foggy through the day. At sunset, shortened sail. Saw no whales this day. Henry Holt sick, and below all day. Continues, light weather through the night. Heard whales blowing several times in the night.

Thursday, April 16, 1846

In the morning, light breeze, with a little rain. Made all sail at sunrise, heading NNE. Wind E. Saw a whale. Lowered three boats. Chased one hour and gave him up. Come on board and got breakfast. Saw another whale, and chased 3 hours. Waist boat got on, and mised the whale. At noon, blows strong. Whole sail breeze, and rains hard. At 2 PM, saw another whale. Lowered, and struck. The waist boat held on one hour and a half, and cut the sea length. Come on board, and shortened sail. Breeze, moderate, and some rain. In the night, wind shifts to N, and blows strong.

Friday, April 17, 1846

Strong breeze at N. Made sail at 10 AM, and headed to the eastward. At 2 PM, saw and chased a whale, going quick to the N. Employed cleaning bone. Henry Holt on duty today. Shortened sail at sunset. Latitude 40° 19’ N at noon Longitude 146° 06’ at 2 PM

Saturday, April 18, 1846

Made all sail at daylight, with fine, light weather, and smooth sea, with a light breeze at ENE. Steered SE. At 9 AM, saw a whale, going quickly to windward. Did not lower for him. At 10 o'clock, wore, and steered N. Afternoon, wind hauls to E. Headed NNE. Saw a spout at sunset. Shortened sail. Latitude at noon 40° 02’  Longitude 146° 40’ E. Night, good weather. Wind shifts to SE.

Sunday, April 19, 1846

Made sail at daylight, with a moderate breeze at SE. Steered ENE. Kept off at 7 o'clock to NE. At 9 o’clock, to N. Breeze increased to a moderate gale, with rain. At 2 o’clock PM, shortened sail, and hove to, heading E. Water green. Continued stormy all night.

Monday, April 20, 1846

Weather moderate, with the wind at N. Sea rough. At 9 AM, saw a whale, and lowered. No success. At noon, lowered for two more. “Gallied” them. At half past 4 PM, lowered for two more. Struck one. Line parted. Weather fine and calm. Shortened sail at sunset. Latitude 41° 49’ Longitude 147° 49’ S

Tuesday, April 21, 1846

Made all sail at daylight AM, with a light breeze at ESE. Heading NNE. Saw one whale, going quick to the S & E. Did not lower for him. At noon, blows strong, and rains. At 2 PM, shortened sail. At sunset, calm and foggy. At 8 o’clock, wind out at WNW. Strong ship headwind NNE.

Wednesday, April 22, 1846

Made sail at 5 o’clock AM. Wind light at NW, and sea smooth. Steered ENE. At 7 AM, set in thick fog. Noon, wind at SW. Fresh breeze. At 4 PM, took in sail. Thick fog. Wind at S. Ship heading ESE. Night, blows strong.

Thursday, April 23, 1846

At daylight, quite good weather. Made all sail. Steered ENE, with a moderate breeze at SW. At 6 AM, saw whales. Lowered two boats. Wind increasing. Called the boats along side, and took in sail at 7 o’clock. At 8 o’clock, saw a ship to the N & E. Blows a moderate gale all day. Latitude at noon 42° 40’ Longitude 149°. At night, moderated down to fine weather.

Friday, April 24, 1846

Made all sail at daylight, with fine, light weather. A ship in sight to the S & E. Cruised NW, NE, and SE. Saw several whales. Chased one at 9 AM to 11 AM. Going fast to the N & E. Afternoon, ran over one with the ship. At 5 o’clock, struck a whale. Held on until sunset. Iron drawed. Come on board, and took in sail. Breeze light at SW. Sea smooth. Continues through the night, good weather.

Saturday, April 25, 1846

Made all sail at daylight, with good weather. Breeze light at SW. Whales in sight. Lowered two boats at sunrise. Could not come up to the whale. Steered ENE one hour, then NNW. Chased another whale one hour. Could not get up with him, and steered NNW. Saw several whales going NE. Lowered, and chased two hours. Lost sight of them. Strong breeze, and rugged, and hazy. Steered ENE. At one o’clock, saw a ship 4 miles off NNE. At half past 1, hauled aback for to speak her. She passed under our lee, out of hail, which we made out to be the bark Prudence [Prudent] of Stonington. The wind increasing to a gale. At 2 PM, took in sail, and lay to, heading W. Saw another whale close to the ship, going NE. The Prudent was under close sail, heading SE. During the night, moderates.

Sunday April 26, 1846

In the morning, light wind and thick fog. Heavy swell from SW. Afternoon, wind shifts to E, with rain. Made no sail today. At noon, wore ship, and lay to, heading NNE. Saw no whales this day. At night, have the wind from SE, and strong and heavy rain, with a cross sea.

Monday, April 27, 1846

Wind shifts from SE to NW, with thick fog in the forenoon. Afternoon, clear up a little. Heavy, ugly sea. Lay to all day. Saw no whales. At sunset, wore ship. Headed NNE. Wind moderate at NW, and cold, and remains so through the night.

Tuesday, April 28, 1846

At daylight in the morning, weather moderate. Breeze light at N. Made sail, heading to eastward. Wind shifts to NE, and increases to a strong gale. At noon, commences to snow. Took in sail at 8 o’clock AM. At sunset, we have a heavy snow storm. Gale moderate from NE. Snows the fore part of the night. Latter part, moderates.

Wednesday, April 29, 1846

The storm has abated, with strong breeze from N. At 10 o’clock AM, made sail, our rigging heavily coated with Ice. At noon, saw whales. Afternoon, chased twice. No success. At sunset, calm, whales still in sight. Latitude 43° 54’ N  Longitude 150° 44’ E. A heavy old swell from NE. Continues moderate through the night. Wind shifts to S.

Thursday, April 30, 1846 (and last)

At daylight, have the wind light at S, and snow. Made sail in a thick snow storm. Steered WSW and SW. At 7 AM, ceases to snow, and wind increases. Shortened sail, and lay to, heading E. Wind SSE. Afternoon, some rain & thick fog. At sunset, nearly calm. Ship heading SSE.

Friday, May 1, 1846

In the morning at daylight, we have quite good weather, with a light breeze at W. Made all sail, and cruised to the N and NE, and SE. At half past 8, saw whales. Chased three hours. At noon, kept off NE. At 2 PM, saw several whales. Lowered, and struck one, and drawed. One hour after, struck another, and soon drawed again. Wind strong. Took in sail. Plenty of whales in sight. Blows strong through the night. Latitude at noon 44° 17’ N Longitude 151° 24’ E

Saturday, May 2, 1846

Moderates in the forenoon. Made sail at 8  o’clock AM. Saw a ship to the SE. Cruised to the ENE. At noon, saw whales. Chased until night. Got nothing. Spoke ship seen in the morning, France of Le Havre. Heard of the loss of the ship Columbia [lost on Sydenham’s Island (Nonouti), January 6, 1846]. France, nothing this season. Shortened sail at sunset, heading NE. Breeze light at NNW, and cloudy. Moderate and calm through the night. Latitude at noon 44° 07’

Sunday, May 3, 1846

At daybreak, commenced snowing, with a light breeze at NE. Made sail, heading ENE. Saw one whale. At 8 o’clock, blows strong, and a thick snow storm. Took in sail. Saw the ship France one mile to the windward at sunrise. Saw a whale in the afternoon. Blows a gale all day. The gale continues, and very cold, all night.

Monday, May 4, 1846

In the morning, we have a strong NW wind, with snow, and very cold, and rugged sea. At noon, kept off and made sail, steering S, for better weather. At sunset, shortened sail, and lay to, heading SW. Wind WNW, and moderating.   Latitude at noon 44° 16’ N Longitude 152° 06’ During the night, quite moderate.

Tuesday, May 5, 1846 

Made all sail at daylight, with fine weather, and a moderate breeze from SW. At 7 AM, tack ship, and steered to the N & W and WNW through the day. Saw but one whale. At sunset, shortened sail, with a strong breeze at S. Wore ship, and lay to, heading ESE. Blows strong through the night, from S. Latitude at noon 43° 45’ Longitude 151°

Wednesday, May 6 1846

Today, as we expected, we have a gale of wind, and rain from S. Lay to, heading ESE. Set the foresail at 8 o’clock AM, and took it in at noon. The gale continues with heavy rain until midnight. Ship heading WSW after 6 o’clock PM. 

Thursday, May 7, 1846

Morning, moderate after the blow. Made all sail at sunrise, and cruised to the eastward, with a light breeze from the W and NW. At 1 PM, lowered our boats for two whales. Could not get near them. Saw another at 4 PM, going quick to the northward. Took in sail, the ship rolling very heavy. Breeze light at S. Night pleasant and calm. Latitude at noon 44° N Longitude at 2 PM 152° 05’ E

Friday, May 8, 1846

At sunrise, clear and a light breeze, but increasing. Made sail. In about one hour, shut in a heavy, thick fog. Took in sail, with a strong breeze at SSW. Afternoon, clear off. Made sail at 1 o’clock, and steered NE. At half past 2 PM, saw a ship to the E. At 4, spoke the ship Addison, New Bedford, 7 months out, 160 bbls. sperm. Had not seen any right whales. Got some papers as late as October 1845. Shut in a thick fog, and we shortened sail as soon as Capt. Destin returned on board. Weather light, but foggy through the night.

Saturday, May 9, 1846

Morning, thick fog. Wind, light at ESE. At 10 o’clock, clears up. Made all sail, and steered NE one hour. Tacked, and steered S by W until night. Weather thick, with light rain after 1 o’clock PM. Shortened sail at half past 6 o’clock. At night, foggy.

Sunday, May 10, 1846

At daylight, thick fog. At 6 o’clock, clears off. One ship in sight. Light breeze at WSW, headed NW. Saw whales. Chased, and gallied them. Calm until 3 PM. At 8 AM, 3 ships in sight. Cruised eastward. At 6 PM, saw whales. Moderate breeze from SSW. At 7, took in sail, heading W. Night at 12 o’clock, wore ship, and headed S.

Monday, May 11, 1846

At daylight, thick fog, and moderate breeze at SW. At 6 o’clock, made sail, with the fog breaking away. At 7, saw a ship, which proved to be the Stephania of New Bedford, no whale this season. Saw whales three times, and chased them. Saw two ships in the afternoon. One was the Louvre of New London, as heard by the Stephania, no oil this season. Ran off towards night E by N. This day has been very good weather. At sunset, took in sail. Lay to, heading NNW. Latitude 44° 47’ Longitude 153° 31’

Tuesday, May 12, 1846

This day, light breeze in the forenoon at WSW. Saw and chased one whale. At 11 o’clock, came up thick fog. Afternoon, calm & foggy. At sunset, light air at NE, and rain and snow. Saw one ship today. Cruised to the eastward. Took in sail at 5 o’clock PM. Blows a moderate breeze through the night.

Wednesday, May 13, 1846

Made sail at daylight, with a strong breeze at NW, and very cold. Steered E. Had several squalls of snow. Latitude at noon 45° 03’ Longitude 155° 47’ E.

Thursday, May 14, 1846

At daylight, strong breeze at NW, and very cold. Made sail, and steered E. At 8 o’clock, hauled up S. Breeze moderate. Made all sail at 10 o’clock, steering SSW. At 2 PM, saw whales. At 4, struck one. Killed him and he sank. At sunset, took in sail. Quite good weather, and continues through the night. Latitude 44° 47’ Longitude 156° 45’

Friday, May 15, 1846

At daylight, calm. At 6 o’clock, a light breeze at ENE, with a light flight of snow. Saw whales 6 miles off to the N & W. At 8 o’clock, close to them. Lowered for them, and gallied them. Chased three times today. Afternoon, strong breeze at ESE, and rain, and cold, and thick. At 2 PM, took in sail, heading to the southard. Strong gale through the night.

Saturday, May 16, 1846

At 5 o’clock AM, took in the fore sail, and close-reefed the mail topsail, with a strong gale at SE, and continues through the day. Afternoon, shifts to SW, with fog. Blows a strong gale at night.

Sunday, May 17, 1846

At daylight, good weather. Breeze, light at SW.  At 3 o’clock AM, a ship passed within a half mile of us, heading to the westward under short sail. Made all sail, and steered N. Most of the day, calm. After 2 PM, a light breeze at E. Steered NNW. At sunset, took in sail, with every appearance of a storm tomorrow. Latitude at noon 44° 23’ N Longitude 157° 18’ E

Monday, May 18, 1846

Made sail at daylight, with a moderate breeze at E, and steered N by E. At 6 o’clock, saw a whale. Lowered the boats, but came in thick, and lost sight of him. Steered S by W until 10 AM, then foggy. Took in sail. At half past 2 PM, made sail, and steered NW. At 4, took in sail. Thick fog.

Tuesday, May 19, 1846

Morning, thick fog, and a light breeze at E. At 10 AM, shifts to W and clears up. Saw a ship to the westward. Made sail, and steered SSW. At noon, spoke the ship Lewis, no whale this season. Steering to the eastward. Saw one whale at 2 PM. Blowing strong. Took in sail at 4 o’clock, and headed NNW. At sunset, wind dies away. Night, good, clear weather.

Wednesday, May 20, 1846

Made sail at daylight, with a moderate breeze at WNW. Cruised to the eastward. Saw several whales, but could not get hold of any. Breeze strong, and sea rough. Shortened sail at sunset. Latitude at noon 44° 30’ Longitude at 2 PM 157° 32’. Mild weather throughout the night. 

Thursday, May 21, 1846

Made all sail at daylight, with a light breeze at WSW. Steered NW. From 8 to 10 o’clock, calm. At noon, a light breeze at SSW, with snow. Steered NNE. At 3½ PM, clear weather. Saw a whale, and chased him 3 hours. But no success. Breeze, light at ESE. Steered NE until 7 o’clock. Commenced snowing. Took in sail. Mild and pleasant weather through the night.

Friday. May 22, 1846

At daylight, quite moderate, and good whaling weather. Made all sail, with a light breeze at NW. Cruised to the S & W. At 7 AM, cruised to the N & E, with a strong breeze in squalls, with snow. Afternoon, clear and very cold. Kept on to the N & S. Saw a great many finbacks, but no right whales. At 6 PM, saw a ship to the eastward. Breeze, light at NW. Took in sail at sunset, heading WSW. Latitude at noon (by obs.) 45° 00’ N Longitude (by chronometer) at 2 PM 158° 04’ E

Saturday,  May  23, 1846

Made sail at daylight, with a strong breeze at NE. Cruised to the N & W, and steered W. At noon, saw two whales. Chased them all of the afternoon. At sunset, breeze light at N. Took in sail, and lay with the ship’s head WNW. At night, fine weather, and but little wind.

Sunday, May 24, 1846

At daylight, pleasant, made all sail. At noon, blows a moderate gale from SW, took in sail, heading WNW. At sunset, blows strong, and hazy, with appearances of rain. This day, had a roast pig for dinner. One raised on board of the ship. Seven weeks old, from a sow got at Guam. Continues blowing through the night.

Monday, May 25, 1846

At daylight, moderated, with snow and some fog. Made sail at 6 AM, with clear weather and a moderate breeze. Saw two whales, going quick to the windward. Wind NW. Steered WSW until 9  AM, then to the NE. At 10 AM, saw whales. Lowered, and chased until 1 PM. Come on board. Lowered at 3 o’clock PM. Struck a whale. Held 20 minutes, and drew. Come on board. Lowered at 4 PM, and chased a whale 5 miles to windward. Come on board at 6 o’clock. Took in sail at 7½ o’clock. Most calm, fine weather through the night.

Tuesday, May 26, 1846

At sunrise 4½ o’clock, good weather, but a light air at SW. Made all sail. Headed SE one hour, then NW. At 8 o’clock, breezes up. At 10 AM, strong breeze. At noon, lowered, and chased a whale two hours. Lost sight of him. The boats come on board. At 2 PM, steered NW, with a strong breeze. Saw some hump backed..Took in sail at sunset. Quite moderate. Latitude 45° 44’ Longitude 157° 23‘  

Wednesday, May 27, 1846

All this day, thick fog, and a light breeze at SW. Made no sail today. Night about the same.

Thursday, May 28, 1846

At daylight, foggy, with breeze light at WSW. At 9 AM, lights up a little. Made sail, heading S. Saw several hump and finbacks. At 7 PM, saw three whales, going quick to the northward. Lowered, and tried, but could not come up with them. Fresh breeze and squalls of fog all night. At sunset, took in sail. Latitude 46° 00’ Longitude 156° 35’

Friday, May 29, 1846

At daylight, foggy. Clears off at 5 o’clock. Made sail, with a strong breeze at NW. Steered WSW and SW. Saw nothing today but finbacks. The day ends with fine weather and a steady light breeze at N. Latitude at noon 44° 53’ Longitude 155° 30’. At sunset, took in sail. The night, quite pleasant.

Saturday, May 30, 1846

Made all sail at daylight, with a light air at NNW. Steered W. Saw a whale at 9 A.M. Lowered all the boats. In 20 minutes, the larboard boat struck. The captain got his boat stove, and soon filled. The crew got into the bow boat. The other two boats had killed the whale by this time, and he soon turned up. Got him alongside at noon. Commenced cutting at 1 PM, with fine, light weather. Finished cutting at 7 PM. Saw other whales this afternoon, and chased them. Commenced boiling at 9 PM. Continues mild weather through the night. Latitude 44° 30’ Longitude 154° 38’ at noon

Sunday, May 31, 1846

Made sail at daylight, heading N. Wind moderate at ENE. Headed SE at 6 AM. Come onto blow. Took in sail at 9 AM. Saw whales going NE. Saw a ship.

Monday, June 1, 1846

Blows a strong breeze at NE. Lay to, under the fore sail and double reefed main topsail. Afternoon, moderates. Saw a ship to the S. At night, quite moderate, but cloudy. Continued boiling, 100 bbls. turned up.

Tuesday, June 2, 1846

At 4½ AM, spoke ship Ajax of Le Havre, France, two whales. Fine weather. Made all sail. Saw several whales, and lowered for one at 8 AM. Got gallied in the smoke. Boiling, 150 bbls. turned up. Cruised SE & N. Finished boiling at 5 PM. Have turned up 190 bbls.

Wednesday, June 3, 1846

At daylight, made all sail, with but a light air. Most of the day, calm. Had a snow squall. Broke out the after hold, and stowed down 140 bbls. of oil. Chased whales twice. Night, calm.

Thursday, June 4, 1846

Made all sail at daylight. At sunrise, lowered, and struck a whale. Killed, and sank him. At 6 o’clock, came on board, and finished stowing down the oil, 200 bbls. Afternoon, chased whales six miles from the ship. Gallied them. Come on board. At 5 PM, whales close to the ship. Went off and struck one with the bow boat. Held onto him one hour after dark, and cut. Whale spouting thin blood. Breeze light at ENE. Two ships in sight today. Night, calm.

Friday, June 5, 1846

At sunrise, a gentle breeze at NE. Saw a whale. Lowered two boats, and chased one hour.   At noon, blows a strong breeze from NE, with rain and thick weather. Chased a whale in the afternoon. Too shy to get hold off. Half past two, blows and rains. Took In sail. Saw one ship today. Cruised NNW & ESE. Wind NE.  Employed stowing [missing section of page]

Saturday, June 6, 1846

Thick foggy weather, with a strong breeze at NE. Chased one whale at 5 AM. At 6 AM, spoke the French ship Ajax, and “gammed” all day. At sunset, took in sail, heading ESE. Wind light at NE, and thick weather. Quite good weather through the night. Wind light.

Sunday, June 7, 1846

At daylight, made all sail, with a light air from NW. Steered NNE. Saw a whale, and chased him, in company with the Ajax. Calm most of the day. At sunset, have a light air from W. The Ajax, 15 miles astern, took in sail at sunset, heading NNW.

Monday, June 8, 1846

This day, light wind and foggy. Could only see two miles. Saw 4 whales. Struck two. Drawed from one. Separated from the other. At sunset, spoke the Bremen ship Hanseat, two whales, steered NNE. Capt. Destin went on board of the Hanseat, took in sail. Night, fine weather.

Tuesday, June 9, 1846

Fine weather, and a steady light breeze at E. Cruised to the N & E. Saw the bark, spoken last evening, to the westward. Saw but one whale this day. Lowered for him. Going too quick. Steered to the WSW after 5 PM. At sunset, took in sail. Moderate breeze through the night.

Wednesday, June 10, 1846

This day, have a strong breeze at SSE. Cruised NE and NW and W. Saw 5 whales, and lowered three times, and gallied the whales. In the morning, saw a ship to the southward, steering SW, and boiling. At 4 PM, took in sail. Blowing strong, and commenced to rain. Latitude at noon 43° 36’ N Longitude at 10 AM 153° 48’ E

Thursday, June 11, 1846

Foggy until 2 o’clock PM. Lights up. Made all sail, and steered SE. Saw 4 whales, and lowered. Got close to one. Gallied. Come in, thick fog. At half past 6 o’clock, boats come on board. Breeze strong. At half past 7, took in sail. Have a heavy swell from the SSE. Capt. Destin and Holt had a growl [a muttering complaint] this morning, again about my humble self. Foggy through the night.

Friday, June 12, 1846

Thick fog all day, with a light breeze at SSW. Light up a little at 3 PM, and we made sail. Steered NW. Wind WSW. Took in sail at sunset, with clear weather and headed S.  Saw no whales.

Saturday, June 13, 1846

At daylight, clear. Made all sail. Saw a whale close by. Lowered two boats, and gallied him. Foggy for two hours. At ten o’clock, saw more whales, and chased the remainder of the day. Breeze, very light. Towards night, calm. Saw as many as 12 whales, but could not get near them, very shy. At dark, two within a half mile of the ship. Calm and clear. Took in sail. Latitude at noon 44° 28’ Longitude 154° 57’

Sunday, June 14, 1846

This day, we have a thick fog. At 5 AM, saw two whales near the ship. At 7, made sail. At 2 PM, took in sail. At 4, made sail again. At 7 PM, took in sail. Breeze light at ENE. Cruised SE and N. Today, have a roast pig for dinner.

Monday, June 15, 1846

Made sail at 6 AM. Fog most of the day. Saw no whales. Steered SW in the afternoon. Latitude at noon 44° 32’ Longitude 155° 23’

Tuesday, June 16, 1846

At 12 o’clock last night in a thick fog, came nigh running afoul of the ship Addison of New Bedford. Hailed, got one whale. Today, thick fogg. At 10 AM, made all sail, and steered N and NNE until sunset. Took in top gallant sails and main sail. Steering NNE, with a light steady breeze at SE. Later part of the night, clear weather. Steered NE by N.

Wednesday, June 17, 1846

Made all sail at 4 AM, with fine, clear weather. Saw a whale at sunrise, 4½  o’clock. Lowered, but did not get him. Lowered again at 8 AM, did not get a whale. Lowered again at noon, but got nothing. Cruised to the N & E. Saw other whales. Breeze light. Afternoon, thick fog. At sunset, shortened sail. Wind E. Latitude 45° 28’ Longitude 155° 05’

Thursday, June 18, 1846

Have fine, light pleasant weather, and a little fog before 9 AM. Breeze, light at SE. Saw a ship to the northward. No whales seen today. Latitude at noon 46° 20’ Longitude 155° 54’ E. Carried all sail through the night, steering ENE, with a light air from SE, and fine weather.

Friday, June 19, 1846

Light air, and calms. Steering ENE. Saw two ships. One to the northward 15 miles, and the other to the eastward 12 miles. Saw no whales. Shot some ducks. Latitude (by obs.) 46° 49’ Longitude (by chronometer) 156° 43’ E. Night, fine, light weather. 

Saturday, June 20, 1846

Fine weather, with a light breeze at  SSE. At 7 AM, lowered, and struck two whales, and parted from one, and drawed from the other. Saw and chased two more in the afternoon. Spoke ship Montezuma, 6 whales. Latitude at noon 47° 09’

Sunday, June 21, 1846

Had a fresh breeze through the night from SSE, and steered E, in company with the Montezuma. Come in thick at 3 AM, and lost sight of her. Thick all this day. At noon, wore ship, and steered SSW. At 1 PM, saw the Montezuma to leeward 3 miles. Ran off, and Capt. Baker come on board, and stayed until 8 PM. Capt. Baker is sick with the rheumatism. Has been, for six weeks. This is the first of his being out. Heard from the India, with 7 whales, 6 weeks ago. At 8 PM, parted company, the Montezuma going to the ENE, and we to the S.   Wind light at ESE, and a thick fog. Remains thick most of the night. At sunset, shortened sail, and lay to, under foresail and double reef main topsail.

Monday, June 22, 1846

Have a strong breeze from ENE, with rain at noon. Saw several whales. At 6 PM, exchanged colors with a French bark heading NNW. Blows strong, with rain through the night.

Tuesday, June 23, 1846

Have a strong breeze from NE, with rain in the forenoon. Heading NW. Made some sail.  Continues to moderate. Saw finbacks in plenty, but no right whales. At sunset, took in sail.  Heading WNW. Weather light through the night. Breeze light at N, with fog.

Wednesday, June 24, 1846

Made sail at 4 AM, with a light breeze at N. Steered ENE. Saw plenty of finbacks at noon.  Saw two ships. Afternoon, steered S. Saw 1 whale. Lowered three boats. Capt. Destin struck, and got stove bad. Killed the whale, and it sunk. At sunset, took in sail. Weather foggy. Wind light. Four ships in sight. Latitude at noon 47° 28’ Longitude 159° 59’

Thursday, June 25, 1846

Calm and foggy until 10 AM. Light breeze. Made sail. Headed NW and S. At 2 PM, saw 4 ships. At sunset, spoke ship Sally Anne, New Bedford, 2 whales, and bark Prudent, Stonington, 7 whale. Calm. Capt. Destin on board of the Sally Anne, and Capt. Brewster. Saw no whales this day. Night foggy and calm.

Friday, June 26, 1846

Fine weather in the morning. Made all sail at daylight, and steered to the N &.W. The Sally Anne and bark in sight to the N. Afternoon, “gammed” with the Sally Anne. Some fog. Wind light at W & S and SE. At night, fog. Saw nothing but finbacks today.

Saturday, June 27, 1846

At daylight, made all sail, and headed to the northward, with a good breeze at E. Saw the Sally Anne headed to the southward. At 7½ AM, shut in thick fog. Steered WNW. At ten AM, took in sail, and lay to until 3½ PM. Clears off. Made all sail, and steered NW. At 7 ½ PM, passed a ship two miles off, boiling. Exchanged colors. At sunset, reefed topsails, and headed NE by N, with the other ship on our weather beam [side of the ship facing the wind], 3 miles off. Saw nothing this day but finbacks. Steered to the. At night, under double reefed topsails and foresail, with the other ship to windward.

Sunday, June 28, 1846

At 3½ o’clock AM, made all sail. Steering N, with a good breeze at ENE, and clear weather, with the ship seen last evening off our lee bow, 3 miles off, a boiling yet. Saw several finback. Had some fog. At 1 PM, saw 8 or ten whales. At 2 PM, the waist boat struck one. Killed him, and got him alongside. At 3½ o’clock, commenced cutting. Got the throat and 1 lip. Fin chain parted, and we knocked off, and took in sail, with thick fog.

Monday, June 29, 1846

Fine weather, with a light breeze at ENE. Did not begin to cut the whale until 10 AM, and finished at 6 PM, and lowered for another whale. At night, calm. Carried sail, heading to the eastward. Had whales around us.

Tuesday, June 30, 1846

All the forenoon, calm, with several whales close to the ship. Could not lower for them on account of fog. At noon, clears off a little. Whales out of sight. Stowed down in the run, the whales were scared away by the noise made in coopering on board of the ship. (Commenced boiling at 7 o’clock yesterday morning.) Strong breeze at night, and thick fog from WSW.

Wednesday, July 1, 1846

At 5 AM, clears off, and we have a fine day, with a good whole sail breeze from W. Cruised N and S, and saw any quantity of whales. But, few right whales. Lowered two times, and the larboard quarter boat gallied the whales both times by carelessness. Finished boiling at 12 PM at night, and turned about 160 bbls.

Thursday, July 2, 1846

Have a fine day, with a light breeze NNW. Cruised to the S & W and N & E. Saw several whales. Lowered four times, and struck 3 whales, and saved one. Stowed down 60 bbls. in the after hatch yesterday. Finished stowing the run, 50 bbls. At night, foggy, and wind light. Whale alongside. Latitude 48° 37’ Longitude 157° 38’ E

Friday, July 3, 1846

Commenced cutting at six AM, and finished at 11 AM. Commenced strong breeze, SSW, and clears off. At noon, saw 4 whales, and chased them. Commenced boiling. Cruised W. Saw 2 whales, and chased them at 5 PM. Night, blows a gale.

Saturday, July 4, 1846

Blows a moderate gale from SSW most of the day, and thick, hazy weather, and some rain. Lay to, all day. Boiling. Saw some whales. At night, quite moderate, but a little wind at 11PM. Wind hauls to WSW. Ship headed S.

Sunday, July 5, 1846

The forenoon, light breeze at W. Cruised to the N, and to the S & E. Some fog. Afternoon, cruised SW. At sunset saw 3 whales, 6 miles to the windward. Finished boiling at 6 PM. Turned up 75 bbls. At night, carry double reefed topsails. Wind light at NW. Saw a ship to the eastward.

Monday, July 6, 1846

At 5 AM, lowered away for a whale. Struck at 6. Killed, and got it alongside at 8 o’clock. Have fine weather and calm most of the day. Finished cutting at 4 PM, and commenced boiling, and stowed down 50 bbls. of oil in the forehold. Night, light weather. Headed to the N & E. Light air, ESE. Latitude at noon 48° 07’ Longitude 157° 26’

Tuesday, July 7, 1846

Light weather, and a light breeze at SE. Saw a whale at 3½ AM, and lowered for him. No success. Cruised to the northwest. Lowered again at 10 AM. Gallied the whale. Saw a ship to the eastward. The whale cut yesterday is very fat.

Wednesday, July 8, 1846

At 5 AM, saw 3 whales, and chased them. Could not strike them. At noon, pass the ship Friends’ boats, with two dead whales. Capt. Howard came alongside. Afternoon, chased whales 3 times. Light airs and calms all day. At night, finished boiling at 12 o’clock. Turned up 160 bbls.

Thursday, July 9, 1846

Light breeze. Chase whales, 2 times. Saw the ship Friends cutting. Stowed down 250 bbls., forehold.

Friday, July 10, 1846

Forenoon, calm. Lowered three boats for whale 6 miles from the ship. Afternoon, headed to the northward, with a good breeze. At 1 PM, saw 2 Whales near the ship. Lowered four boats and gallied them. At 3, lowered for two others. At 4, Capt. Destin struck. The whale run very bad. At 8, turned him up, and got him alongside and fluked. At half past 8, took in sail.

Saturday, July 11, 1846

Commenced a stormy breeze at daylight. Commenced cutting at 6 o’clock, and finished at 11 AM, with a moderate gale from SW, but found the whale a very poor one. A dry skin. Don’t expect to get ten bbls. out of it. Blubber enough for 120. Lay to at night under close reefed main topsail. Heading SSE. In the night, the wind shifts to WNW, and blows a strong gale.

Sunday, July 12, 1846

Blows a gale until 10 o’clock AM, then lulls a little, and we made sail, and steered N. At 4 PM, saw some whales, and lowered 3 boats, the whales going to the windward quick, and the sea very rough. Boats come on board. Took in sail at 7 o’clock. Today, threw overboard the whale’s tongue, and expect to throw the blubber tomorrow. Moderate at sunset, and through the night.

Monday, July 13, 1846

Made all sail at 4 AM, with a gentle breeze at W, and plied to windward all day. Saw no whales, but fin and humpbacks. Lowered once today. Employed cleaning bone, and setting up pipes [large barrels]. Have the blubber yet in the blubber room. Fine weather. At night, carry sail to get to windward. Wind light at WNW, and shifts to the SE & E.  Latitude

Tuesday, July 14, 1846

In the morning, have a light, whole sail breeze at ESE, and increasing with rain. At 6 AM, saw a whale, and chased him, going quick to windward. At 7, chased two more, going quick to windward. Breeze increased, with much rain. Steered WNW until 8 AM. At 9 AM, took in sails. At 4 PM, have the wind NE and moderate. Saw 1 whale this afternoon. Ship heading NNW. Night, clear and pleasant, and but a light breeze at NW.

Wednesday, July 15, 1846

Commences a strong breeze at 3 AM. At 8, blows a gale. Commenced boiling the blubber, cut in on Saturday last. Boiled 4 hours, and gained nothing. And at 11, commenced throwing it off overboard, and finished at 2 PM. Made sail at 6 AM, and took it in at 8 AM. Moderates again at 2 PM. Made sail, steering NNE. At 5 PM, lowered for two whales. Gallied them, and came on board. At 6 PM, got supper, and down again. Capt. Destin struck at half past 6. At 9, had him fluked alongside of the ship. Very large. Took in sail. Weather quite mild. Latitude at noon 48° 08’ Longitude 156° 36’

Thursday, July 16, 1846

Commenced cutting at 5 AM, with good, pleasant weather. Did not finish until 3 PM. Whale very large, and not fat. Saw whale at noon, and lowered for them, going fast to windward. At sunset, steering N. Saw five whales close to the ship. Night, fine, light weather. At 12 o’clock, head SSW.

Friday, July 17, 1846

Have fine weather, and a light breeze at SSW and W. Saw plenty of whales, and struck one, and cut from him. Capt. Destin.

Saturday, July 18, 1846

At sunset last night, our black-hearted skipper come on board after chasing two whales, and commenced a bitter tirade of his abuse on me again, cursing and damning me all up in heaps, threatening to break my head, etc. Lucky for him that he kept his hands off. Have fine weather, and a gentle breeze at S. Saw a ship to the westward. Forenoon, had some fog.  Afternoon, saw whales, and chased them. No success. Lowered twice. At night, quite moderate.

Sunday, July 19, 1846

At 4 AM, whale close by the ship. Been in the try smoke. Lowered, and chase. No success. Saw a great many whales through the day. Lowered 8 times. The starboard boat struck one, and drawed. At 6 PM, I struck one, in the bow boat, and got the head of my boat stove. Gave my line to the waist boat. She held on a few minutes, and drawed. In hoisting my boat up, broke her head all off. Good weather, with a moderate breeze at SSW. Cruised W and SE. Whale very wild, and hard to get hold of. At 8 PM, shortened sail, and finished boiling. Turned up 125 bbls. Night, quite moderate.

Monday, July 20, 1846

At daylight, called all hands, and got in the bow and larboard quarter boats, and but out two others. Weather thick. Got ready to stow down. Saw whales at 6 AM. The weather quite good, and clear. After 6, made sail. Afternoon, some squalls of fog. Saw several whales, and lowered three times this day. But, all shy, and going quick to the westward. Employed stowing down. Chocked off the after hatch, and commenced in the fore. Good breeze at SSW. Cruised to the SE after 9 AM.

Tuesday, July 21, 1846

Made sail at 4 AM, with a moderate breeze at SSW. Breeze increases, with thick fog, and rain. Saw two whales, and lowered for them. No success. Employed stowing down. Chocked off the fore hatch and commenced in the fore peak. Afternoon, blows strong. Finished stowing at 5 o’clock PM. 125 bbls. At 6 o’clock, took in sail. Cruised SE and W. Moderate at night, with fog.

Wednesday, July 22, 1846

Have good weather, with a light breeze at WSW and W. Saw several whales, and chased two. Afternoon, foggy. Cruised to the S & W. At sunset, clear and calm. Quite light through the night, with fog. Wind shifts to S. Employed repairing the boats.

Thursday, July 24, 1846

Made sail at 6 AM. Fog clears off. Saw several whales, going quick to the S & E. Chased two, once. Afternoon, thick fog, and some rain, with a whole sail breeze at SE and S. Steered off to the N & W. At 4 PM, took in sail. Employed repairing the boats, and setting up pipes.

Friday, July 24, 1846

This day, calms and fogs. Some rain. Finished repairing the bow boat. Heard whales blow not far off.

Saturday, July 25, 1846

The forenoon, have rain and fog, and calm. Heard whales blowing. Afternoon, came up a strong breeze at N. Saw whales in plenty. Lowered,  and chased, 3 times. Very rough sea. Wind shifts to NW, steers NNE. Strong breeze. Took in sail at sunset. Night, blows strong. Ship heading WSW.

Sunday, July 26, 1846

Blows too strong to make sail. Lay to all day. Wind at NW. Saw some whales. Afternoon, clear and dry. Painted the bow boat.

Monday, July 27, 1846

Strong breeze at WNW all of the forenoon. Made easy sail at sunrise. Employed in cleaning and drying bone. At noon, lowered for a whale. Afternoon, moderates for two hours, then blows strong again. Reefed. At 5 PM, moderates, almost calm, some rain. Saw several whales, and chased three at one lowering. No success today. At sunset, calm. Took in sail. Latitude (by obs.) at noon 48° 35’ N Longitude (by chronometer) at 2 PM 157° 54’ E

Tuesday, July 28, 1846

Have had light breezes. Light rain from E. Cruised N and S. Saw plenty of whales, and going very quick. Chased four times, at 4 lowerings. The larboard quarter boat got onto one, and missed. Saw some island bearing WNW at sunset. Calm at sunset. Took in sail. Latitude. Calm all night.

Wednesday, July 29, 1846

Have fine, pleasant weather, with a light breeze at W. Lowered three times, and struck one whale. The larboard quarter boat got capsized, and we lost the whale. Cruised NNW and SSW, with the land in sight. Saw but two whales today. At sunset. Let the land bore NW by N. Took in sail, heading SSW. Latitude (by obs.) 48° 30’ N Longitude 57° 14’ E

Thursday, July 30, 1846

The forenoon, clear and pleasant, with a light breeze at W. Cruised to the N & W. Saw nothing but finbacks. At noon, kept off ENE. Saw the land, bearing NW by N. At 3 PM, set in thick fog, with the wind at SW. Employed cleaning and drying bone. Henry Holt below deck. Took in sail at half past six, heading SSE. Continues foggy through the night.

Friday, July 31, 1846

Foggy most of the day, with a moderate breeze at SW. Made sail at noon, and steered WNW. Took it in at 6½ o’clock.

Saturday, August 1, 1846 

This day, made sail at daylight AM at 6 o’clock, saw a large ship under double reefed topsails, steering SSE, passed to leeward of us 8 miles. At 7 AM, we kept off to NE, with a moderate breeze at SW, and have fog and heavy rain all the day. At 1½ PM, took in sail. Henry Holt on duty again, and has left the captain table in the after cabin, and eats with the boat steerers in the forward cabin. At sunset, heavy rain, and light wind at SSW. Wore ship, and headed SE at 10 PM. Stops raining, and foggy through the night.

Sunday, August 2, 1846

Light wind, calms, and fog. Saw a ship to the N & W. Lowered once for a humpback, and twice for right whales. Cruised to the N & S. At sunset, took in sail. Capt. Destin and Mr. Lyons only lowers these three days past. Night, have light air and fog, and thunder and lightning.

Monday, August 3, 1846

Made sail at daylight, with a light breeze at SSE, and thick and rainy. Continues to rain heavy until 8 o’clock, then clears off. Saw a ship to the N & W. Saw two whales, and lowered all four boats. Shut in thick until 11 o’clock. Saw two more whales. Shut in again. At 1 PM, saw whales again. Chased them, and “gallied“ them. At 3 PM, thick fog. Steered NW until sunset, and took in sail. Latitude at noon 49° 14’ N Longitude 

Tuesday, August 4, 1846

Foggy 4 hours in the morning. At 9 AM, saw the land to the NW. At 10, saw a ship. At noon, spoke ship Globe of New Bedford, 5 whales. Steered NW, with a strong breeze at NE. At sunset, the land 25 miles off, bearing from SW to NE. Saw plenty of humpbacks. No right whales. Carry all sail at night.

Wednesday, August 5, 1846

This day, have fine, light, pleasant weather. Run in within ten miles of the land, which we suppose to be island near the coast of Kamchatka, and the straits going into the Sea of Okhotsk. Breeze light from NE to SE. Steered along to the N & E. Saw many humpbacks. This land is not very high, but is almost covered with snow. Wind light, and thick fog through the night. Steered ENE. Latitude at noon 50° 14’ N  

Thursday, August 6, 1846

Have a moderate breeze at S & SW, with a thick fog. Steered ENE and NE. At 2 PM, took in sail, and headed to the SE. At 2 AM, headed WNW. Continues foggy through the night.

Friday, August 7, 1846

Have thick fog until 8 o’clock AM. Clears off. Made sail, and steered NW, with a strong breeze at SW. At 10 o’clock, saw the land ahead. At half past ten, lowered the boats, and the mate’s boat got fast to a whale. After an hour, the whale took his line. Afternoon, ran into within ten miles of the land. At 7 PM, headed off shore. Breeze very light. Have the land to the eastward, bearing NNE, and to the westward, bearing WSW. Mountains high, and much snow. Latitude at noon 50° 50’ N 

Saturday, August 8, 1846

In the morning, off shore 30 miles, and have a strong breeze at SW. Stood in for the land. At 8 o’clock, two boats started for the shore, distant 10 miles. Breeze light. Wore, and stood off. At noon, stood in, and the boats come off. Got nothing but wood. The weather, fine and pleasant. Steered NE, along the land. Latitude at noon 51° 20’ 

Sunday, August 9, 1846

Latitude 52° 09’. Ran along ten miles from the land to the N & E. Breeze [missing section of page]

Monday, August 10, 1846

At 4 AM, off Awatska [Avacha] Bay 25 miles, with a moderate breeze at WSW. Run in near the land, and got becalmed, and had to down boats and tow off shore. Saw two ships standing in. Saw a merchant ship come out of Petropavlovsk. At sunset, spoke the ship Sally Anne, New Bedford, wanting one whale, going in to cooper. Saw the French ship John Cockerill bound in light air off shore. Double reefed, and headed off shore. Light air, and calms through the night.

Tuesday, August 11, 1846

Have light airs and calms. Afternoon, had a light breeze from the southward, and towed in to the bay about 25 miles, and anchored at the port at sunset. Found one ship at the port, the Olive Branch of New Bedford, 9 months out, 300 bbls. Passed in the mouth of the bay the ship Newburyport, 2700 bbls., and ship Cassander of Providence, and three French ships.

Wednesday August 12, 1846

Employed getting water, got off 140 bbls. Have fine, warm, pleasant weather. Got 16 pipes of water stowed below.

Thursday, August 13, 1846

Got off 6 casks more of water, and have one watch on liberty on shore. I was on shore part of the day. Saw a procession of the church. I cannot describe it. Weather fine and pleasant.

Friday, August 14, 1846

Have fine weather. One watch on liberty, and myself and boats crew after clams. With much trouble, got about one bbl. I also write a letter to my wife to send by the Sally Anne via New Bedford.

Saturday, August 15, 1846

In the morning, have a light breeze at NW. Weighed anchor, and went about 3 miles down the bay, and got becalmed, and anchored again, and went 4 miles down the bay, and got 3 boat loads of wood. At night, have some rain. 

Sunday, August 16, 1846

At sunrise, have a fine breeze from NW. Weighed our anchor, and ran down to the mouth of the bay ten miles, and anchored. Employed all day getting off wood. Got off about 8 cords. At 5 PM, the Olive Branch back to sea, and one ship in the offing came to anchor outside of us, and was boiling.

Monday, August 17, 1846

At daylight, have a strong breeze at NW. Got underway, and put to sea at 6 AM. At 10 o’clock, saw one whale, and lowered two boats. Got gallied by the boats of a French ship. Steered E and NE. Saw several ships. At 3 PM, spoke the ship Plymouth of Sag Harbor, with a dead whale. At 7 PM, spoke ship Mercury, of New Bedford, and ship India, 4400 bbls., of New London, cutting, and George and Mary, 2100 bbls., boiling. Took in sail, and spoke. At night, a strong breeze, and shifts to NE.

Tuesday, August 18, 1846

Blows strong until 10 AM, then moderates. Made sail at noon, and steered to the eastward. Saw 8 sail of ships. At 3 PM, lowered for a whale. At 4½, the larboard quarter boat got fast. I lowered, and killed, and got him alongside. At sunset, calm and light weather through the night.

Wednesday, August 19, 1846

At daylight, have fine weather, and a light breeze at SW. Commenced cutting at 5½ AM. Spoke a ship belonging to Sag Harbor, 1250 bbls. Finished cutting at noon. Made all sail, and headed to the eastward. Saw several humpbacks, and 5 or 6 ships. 

Thursday, Aug 20, 1846

This day, fine weather and a light breeze. Saw several whales, and lowered our boats (always except the bow boat) eight times, but struck nothing. Several ships in sight. Saw one ship cutting. At night, calm. Off Kings Head in the morning. At night, 40 miles to the S & W. Calm all night. Continued boiling.

Friday, August 21, 1846

Have a light breeze, and some fog from SW. Six or seven ships, some boiling. Steered NE. At sunset, spoke the ship Charles Henry, of New London, 1300 bbls., 13 months out. Saw but one whale today. Steered ENE until 12 o’clock at night, then N, with a 6 knot breeze.

Saturday, August 22, 1846

Have a light breeze at S, steered N. Saw one whale at sunset. Lowered for him, gallied. Calm all night, with light rain. Course NE. Finished boiling at 8 AM. Turned up 135 bbls.

Sunday, August 23, 1846

Calm all through the day. Saw one ship, to the westward. Steering to the N & E. Employed setting up pipe shooks [parts for assembling the pipe-size barrels]. Night calm. Distant from the land 25 miles, and off abreast of Mount Kronotskaya [Kronotsky] and Shepunskanos, which are very high, not less than 3 miles, with their summits covered with snow.

Monday, August 24, 1846

Have fine, light weather, with light airs and calms. Employed stowing down betwixt decks, for the first time. Stowed 22 pipes of 6 bbls. each. Afternoon, have a light breeze at W. Steered ESE. Ship in sight, to the SW. At night. Calm.

Tuesday, August 25, 1846

Calm through the day. At night, have a fine breeze at W. Steered NE 6 hours. At 1 AM, falls calm. A large ship 4 miles to the westward. Steering NE.

Wednesday, August 26, 1846

Calm from 1 AM until 2 PM, then a light breeze at SW. Steered NE. Hove off the south head of the bay. At sunset, chased three whales, and gallied them. Two ships in sight, steering NE. Latter part of the night, calm, 25 miles from the land.

Thursday, August 27, 1846

Light airs and calms. Lowered in the morning for whales, 5 miles from the ship, which turned out to be finback whales. Repaired the mizzen topsail, and cleaned a head of bone. At 4 o’clock, lowered for a whale. Capt. Destin struck, and we turned him up 3 miles from the ship. Towed him to the ship, and got him fast at 10 o’clock, and headed off shore. Saw 3 sail today. Latter part of the night, have a good breeze from the NE.

Friday, August 28, 1846

At 4 AM, all hands to get the whale in. Got him alongside. Chain parted. Got him alongside again, and commenced cutting at 8 AM. Breeze from NE, and a heavy swell run before the wind, and cut. Whale is a very large one. Finished cutting at 7 PM, and commenced boiling. Heading ENE, wind N and light. Saw two ships to the S and W of us. Moderate breeze through the night.

Saturday, August 29, 1846

Strong breeze at N and NNE. Stood in towards the land until noon, near the south head of the great bay. Our whale is very fat, and makes oil fast. Employed boiling, and setting up casks. Saw two whales. Too rough to lower for them. Took in sail at 5 PM.

Sunday, August 30, 1846

Blows a moderate gale, with a heavy sea from N. Headed ENE, under close-reefed main topsail and foresail. Employed boiling, and setting up casks. Have 23 pipes filled.

Monday, August 31, 1846 

Moderates in the forenoon. Saw the land, distant NW 80 miles. Two mountains in the great bay. Afternoon, headed in shore WNW. Quite good weather. At sunset one ship in sight to the S and W. Have 35 pipes turned up, and shall finish tonight. 

Tuesday, September 1, 1846 

Have a strong breeze in the middle of the day. Struck a whale at 10 AM, and lost a line by the waist boat. Afternoon, stood in to the land, and saw several whales within 10 miles of the shore. Spoke the Hamburg ship Elbe, 13 months, 1700 bbls. Saw two other ships. At night, breeze light at SW, steered to the N and E. Employed in taking down the steerage, and shifting the bone, and putting up berths [boards to divide the room] in the forward cabin. 

Wednesday, September 2, 1846

The weather fine, and breeze light at SW. Employed stowing down between decks. Stowed 20 pipes of oil, 120 bbls. Cruised along the land to the NE. Saw a French ship, and the ship Hellespont of Mystic. Capt. Manwaring came on board of us, 13 months out, 1400 bbls, all well. Saw but one whale today, at sunset, in the mouth of the bay. “Gammed” with the ship Hellespont until one o’clock at night.

Thursday, September 3, 1846

Have a light breeze until 9 o’clock AM, then calm until 2 PM. Saw the Hellespont’s boats fast to a whale, but did not get it. Chased two whales at 2 PM. Light breeze at SW, steered NNW. Another ship to the westward. At night carried whole topsails, and headed off shore. Light air through the night. 

Friday, September 4, 1846

Have a fine breeze at S, and steered NW until 10 AM, then NE. But saw but two whales, and chased, one going quick SW.

Saturday, September 5, 1846

At 5 AM, have a strong breeze at S. Hauled the ship up WSW and W. At 9, lowered for a whale. Blows strong, and very rugged, the ship under double reefed topsails. At 2 PM, near the land. Wore ship, and headed SSE. Today, we are where we got our whale on the 19th and 20th of September last. Have only seen one today. At 6 PM, took in sail. Blows strong through the night. 

Sunday, September 6, 1846

Blows strong, from S. Laying to, heading WSW. Afternoon, made sail. At sunset, quite moderate. Took in sail and headed off shore. E by N through the night. 

Monday, September 7, 1846

Light air and calms from SSE and SE, steered SW. Saw nothing but fin backs, 80 miles from the land. At night, breeze light at S. Steered WSW, and carried sail. 

Tuesday, September 8, 1846

Light airs and calms from S. Steered W and WSW. Distant from the land 50 miles SE. Saw some finbacks. Stowed down 9 pipes of oil between decks. At night, carrying all sail, heading SW. Air light from NNW. After 1 o’clock AM, have a fine breeze from NW. 

Wednesday, September 9, 1846

Have a steady breeze from N. After 9 o’clock, have a strong breeze at NW until 8 PM. Cruised across the bay and out to the southward. Saw 3 ships, and several finbacks, but no right whales. At night, calm and light air from the N, headed to the S & W. 

Thursday, September 10, 1846

Calms, and light breeze in the afternoon from S. Saw finbacks, and three right whales at sunset, and lowered for them. Spoke ship Washington of Sag Harbor, and Charles Henry of New London. Saw one ship boiling, and 3 others to the S and W. 

Friday, September 11, 1846

Light air and calm. Saw two whales, and lowered twice. No success. This day at dinner time, the Chief Mate and steward got in a quarrel, and Capt. Destin commanded the mate to stop, and he replied that he would be damned if he did. The captain then collared him, and ordered him out of the cabin, and told me to pass out his things from the cabin, which I done. Capt. Destin ordered him forward, or he might live on deck. Holt swore he would go in the cabin. Capt. Destin also gave all hands orders not to obey him as an officer. At 5 PM, Holt made acknowledgement to Capt Destin, and he came into the cabin again, and eats at the Captain’s table after being from it for 40 days. Thus ends this “flare up.” Saw 4 ship today to the N & E, and we cruised to the S & W. At night, shortened sail. Nearly calm. The ship Charles Henry to the eastward of us 5 miles off. Calm through the night.

Saturday, September 12, 1846

Have a light breeze. Cruised to the westward. Saw two right whales, and chased them, going to the northward quickly. Lowered twice today. The Charles Henry in sight. At sunset, shorten sail, distant from the land 60 miles, and calm. Holt is on duty again and all is quiet, for a spell. Calm through the night.

Sunday, September 13, 1846

Light Breeze until noon. Distant from the land 30 miles, and 40 miles N of Kings Head. Saw a great many humpbacks, but no right whales. Cruised to the southward. Afternoon, have a good breeze from SSW. The ship Charles Henry 20 miles to the S of us, and saw another ship to the southward. Employed repairing old sails. Weather fine and pleasant.

Monday, September 14, 1846

Have a strong breeze from S, a thick weather with rain. Cruised WSW, and ESE. Saw one ship to the N in the morning. Saw no land, nor whales, but fin and humpbacks. From 7 PM to 2 AM,  blows a strong gale from SSE, with rain. At 7 o’clock, took in the foresail, and close-reefed the main topsail. At 1 o’clock AM, lost the waist boat. At 3 AM, moderates.

Tuesday, September 15, 1846

Made all sail at 6 AM, with a light breeze from N, and a heavy sea from S. Steered SSW. At ten, wind shifts to W, and blows a strong breeze. Saw Kings Head at noon, bearing NW, distant 50 miles. At 2 o’clock PM, headed in shore, NNW. At sunset, took in top gallant sails, and headed off shore SSW, and reefed the topsails. Our spanker gallant broke at sunset. Carry sail tonight, and I stand a watch. Saw no right whales today, and we are bound to the S & W. I think we carry sail tonight to leave the coast. Have a strong breeze, and a rough sea.

Wednesday, September 16, 1846

Moderates in the forenoon, and we have fine weather, with breeze light at WNW. Saw one ship in the night, heading to the N & W. Saw another this morning to the E, heading to the S & W. From 6 AM to 9 AM, headed to the N, then to the S & W again. Continues light weather through the night, carrying all sail, bound to the westward. Latitude 51° 36’ N Longitude 160° E

Thursday, September 17, 1846

This day, have fine weather, with a gentle breeze at NW. Steered WSW. Saw a great many finbacks today. Put up a new mizzen gallant. Afternoon, killed the last of our pigs raised on board. It is a fine one, and fat, and weighed, dressed, 70 pounds. Good weather, with a light breeze at WSW. Steered NW. Latitude 50° 42’ N

Friday, September 18, 1846

Steered NW, with a good wholesail breeze at WSW. Saw nothing but hump and finbacks. Saw the land at 1 PM, bearing NW and N. At 5 PM, reefed topsails, and headed SSE. Wind increasing from SW. Wore ship, and headed SSE. Latitude at noon (by obs.) 51° 21’ Longitude (by chronometer) at 2 PM 160° 17’

Saturday, September 19, 1846

Have a strong gale from S. Close-reefed the topsails. At 10 AM, steering WSW. At noon, gale increases, with rain. Wore, and headed ESE, and took in sail, and hove to. Lay to under storm sails. At sunset, moderates, and the wind shifts to NW, and clears off. At 2 o’clock AM, made sail, heading WSW.

Sunday, September 20, 1846

At sunrise, commenced a strong breeze, and blows all day, so that we can only carry close-reeled topsails. Saw a ship to the W, 15 miles, also steering to the S & W. Wind WNW.  Latitude 50° 40’

Monday, September 21, 1846

At 4 o’clock AM, moderates. Made sail. At 7 AM, made all sail, with fine light weather. Steering SW, with a ship seen yesterday off our larboard bow, 10 miles off. At 3 o’clock PM, came up with her and spoke, ship Cachalot, of Le Havre, France, with 1800 bbls., 9 whales this season. Her captain down with a broken leg by the fin chains breaking in cutting a whale, about two months since. Capt. Destin went on board. At night, light and calm. Latitude 49° 14’ Longitude 158° 30’

Tuesday, September 22, 1846

We have calm, and a very light air springs up in the afternoon from E. Steered WSW. The French ship, 5 miles off. Saw some finbacks. Weather clear and warm.At sunset, the Cachalot 15 miles astern. At night, fine whole sail breeze at SE. Steered WSW. Latitude at noon 48° 40’

Wednesday, September 23, 1846

Steered WSW, with a good breeze at SE. Increases to a gale, with rain. At 4 PM, hove too, heading SSW, under short sail, blowing heavy. At 6 PM, took in the waist and bow boats, and wore ship, and headed E. At 7, quite moderate. Wind shifts to S.  Wore ship, and headed SE. At 7½ o'clock, had a heavy shock of an earthquake. The ship trembled like a leaf. Wind light through the night at SW, and clear.

Thursday, September 24, 1846

Headed in NW, with a strong breeze at SW, and saw the land at 2PM, and within 15 miles, one of the northern Japanese isles. Headed off shore, and steered SE, with a strong breeze until 12 at night. Latitude 48° 01’ N Longitude 154° 30' E

Friday, September 25, 1846

Breeze light. Course SE. Sent up the mizzen top gallant sail, which has been down since April 1845. Latitude at noon 46° 40’ Longitude 156° 56’

Saturday, September 26, 1846

Light wind from the westward until afternoon. Steered SE. Sent out flying jib and boom. At night, have a fine breeze from W.

Sunday, September 27, 1846

Light breeze from the NW. Steering SE. Got out studding sails today. Weather warm and pleasant. At 8 PM, wind shifts to ESE. Steered S. Latitude 44° 28’ Longitude 159° 29’

Monday, September 28, 1846

At 3 AM, with the wind SE, and rain. Heading ENE. Pass near a ship, heading to the S. Forenoon, wind shifts to NE. Steered SE. Captain lowered for black fish. Latitude at noon 43° 40’ Longitude 160° 42’. At night, wind shifts to ESE. Headed S.

Tuesday, September 29, 1846

At 4 AM, commenced a strong breeze at ESE, and rain. At 6, under double reefed topsails. At 10 AM, moderate, with light breeze at SW. Steered SE. At 2 PM, fresh breeze, under whole topsails. At 9 PM, all sail, and breeze light at SW. Course SE by E.

Wednesday, September 30, 1846

At 7 AM, commenced a strong breeze at W. Course SE by E. Continues all day. Employed repairing try works, and building a smith’s forge. Latitude at noon (by obs.) 40° 35’ N Longitude (by chronometer) 163° 29’ 

Thursday, October 1, 1846

Wind light at NE. Since 2 AM, steered SE by E under all sail. At noon, some rain. At sunset, nearly a calm. Very light through the night, at ESE, with some rain. Headed NE.

Friday, October 2, 1846

Have a fine whole sail breeze at NE and N, with some rain. Steered SE by E, and ESE after 2 o’clock PM. The weather being cloudy, we have not gotten an observation these two days past. Fine breezes through the night.

Saturday, October 3, 1846

Light breeze all day, at N and NNW, and fine, clear weather, and warm. At 4 PM, breezes in squalls. At 5 PM, strong squalls and rain. At 6, double reefed topsails up to midnight.

Sunday, October 4, 1846

At 4 AM, have all sail on the ship, with fine weather, and a light breeze at NNW. Course ESE and SE by E. Through the day, the same. Latitude (by obs.) 36° 22’ Longitude (by chronometer) 169° 49’

Monday, October 5, 1846

The forenoon, breeze light at E. Ship heading SSE. Afternoon, sudden shifts of wind, with rain and squalls. At sunset, clear, and wind light at SW, and continues a good breeze. Course ESE, under all sail. One man down with the scurvy.

Tuesday, October 6, 1846

Wind strong until 8 o’clock AM, light the remainder of the day, from SW and NW and N, and some rain. Course ESE. Strong breeze at night, and rain. Latitude (by obs.) 33° 50’ Longitude 172° 55’ E. Commenced wetting the hold.

Wednesday, October 7, 1846

Weather very changeable, and wind unsteady at NE and NNE and E at sunset. Fore part of the night, nearly calm. Headed to the S and E. Latitude at noon 32° 14’ Longitude 174° 33’

Thursday, October 8, 1846

With fine, pleasant weather, and a light breeze at SW. Steered ESE.

Friday, October 9, 1846

Pleasant, light weather, and a light breeze at SSW. Steered ESE. Latitude at noon 30° 08’ N Longitude at 2 PM 178° 38’ E

Saturday, October 10, 1846

Light pleasant weather, with a light breeze from SW. Steering SE by E. Employed fitting our rigging. Put a new mizzen stay sail, and sent down the cutting gear aloft (length 12½ foot). Latitude noon 28° 48’ Longitude at 2 PM 180° 31’ E, or otherwise, 179° 24’ W. Passed the Meridian, E.

Sunday, October 11, 1846

Being in W, longitude is Monday in time. Fine, light weather, and a steady breeze at W and WSW.

The weather fine and pleasant, with a good breeze at SW and W. At 8 PM, in a squall. The wind shifts suddenly to N, with rain. Course at SE by E. Being in W longitude again, I change the time and call today Sunday again. Latitude 25° 13’ N Longitude (by obs.) at 9½ AM 174° 05’ W (by chronometer) at 2 PM 174° 37’ W

Monday, October 12, 1846

The weather thick and rainy, with a fine breeze at N. Steering SE by E, under all sail. At night, squally. No observation this day.

Tuesday, October 13, 1846

Good weather, and a fresh breeze at NNE. Carried topsail studding sail at night. Wind varies to the eastward. Latitude (by obs.) at noon 21° 09’ Longitude (by chronometer) at 2 PM 170° 05’ W.

Wednesday, October 14, 1846

This day, breeze unsteady from NNE to E, with squalls of rain. Kept by the wind to the E & S. Night, much the same.

Thursday, October 15, 1846

In the morning, strong squalls of wind and heavy rain, with thunder and lightning. The afternoon, clear and pleasant, with a light breeze at E. Ship heading SSE. Bent a new foretop gallant. Latitude at noon 18° 47’ Longitude (by chronometer) 169° 34’

Friday, October 16, 1846

The weather good, and breeze moderate and steady at ENE and E. Steered SE and SSE.

Saturday,  October 17, 1846

Good weather, and a moderate, steady breeze, variable from NE to E by S. Steering SE and SSE.

Sunday, October 18, 1846

Fine light weather, with a light breeze at ENE, variable to ESE. Latitude 13° 34’

Monday, October 19, 1846

Pleasant weather, and a light breeze at E. Course made S. Latitude 11° 58’ Longitude 168° 34’. Employed at repairing sails, and rigging, and the smith has his forge at work. The cooper is also at his business. And the carpenter has a job. And the captain is a scrimshawing. So, all branches of business flourish at this time.

Tuesday, October 20, 1846

The weather squally, with much rain, with the wind variable from ENE to SE. At night, breeze steady at E.

Wednesday, October 21, 1846

Fine weather, and a steady breeze at ESE. Ship under all sail, heading SE. Latitude 9° 20’ N Longitude 168° 02’ W

Thursday, October 22, 1846

Weather, squalls with rain. Wind variable from NE to SE. At 6 PM, headed to the ENE, with the wind at SE. From 8 to 11 PM, strong squalls of wind and rain. Doubled reefed the topsails at 12, headed to the southward.

Friday, October 23, 1846

Squally most of the day, with heavy rain from ESE. At 2 PM, headed S by E. At night, clear weather, and breeze steady at E.

Saturday, October 24, 1846

Fine, clear weather, with a fresh breeze at E by S. Steering by the wind S by E. Latitude at noon (by obs.) 06° 35’ N Longitude at 2 PM (by chronometer) 166° 02’ W

Sunday, October 25, 1846

Fine weather, with a steady breeze at ESE. Steered S. Latitude at 2 PM 4° 40 Longitude 166° 05’. Employed repairing Sails etc.

Monday, October 26, 1846

Fine weather, with a steady breeze at ESE. Steered S. Latitude at noon 02° 54’ N. Employed at sundry jobs.

Tuesday, October 27, 1846

Light, pleasant weather, and a light breeze at E. Steered SSE. At 5 PM, had a row [quarrel] with Henry Holt, and the captain interposed his authority, and they had some words, and Holt has gone off duty with his own accord. The cause of the row with me was his attempting to take work out of my hands.

Wednesday, October 28, 1846

Light weather, and light breeze at ENE. Steering SE. Employed coopering the oil between decks. Latitude at noon 00° 03’ N Longitude 168° 12’ W

Thursday, October 29, 1846

Fine, light weather, with a light breeze at NE. Steering ESE. Employed coopering oil. Latitude at noon (by obs.) 00° 55’ S 

Friday, October 30, 1846

Fine weather, with a 6 knot breeze at E by N. Saw a ship to the windward, steering to the N & W. Finished coopering at noon. Latitude 02° 15’ S

Saturday, October 31, 1846

The weather fine, and clear, and dry. Light air at 8. Steering SSE. Latitude at noon 3° 40’

Sunday, November 1, 1846

Fine, pleasant weather, with a 5 knot breeze at NNE. At 9 AM, set the studding sails, course ESE. Employed repairing sails, and boat, etc. We have two men off duty with the scurvy, and most of the crew have a touch of it. Henry Holt lays below yet with the sulks. Latitude at noon 4° 40’ Longitude at 2 PM 166° 33’ E

Monday, November 2, 1846

Have a fresh, whole sail breeze at NW and N. Steering ESE. At 7 PM spoke with ship Java, New Bedford, 600 bbls, captain sick. Our captain and doctor go on board, and return at 8 PM with some potatoes and pumpkins. The doctor remains for a few days, and we keep in company, and steer for the Navigator Islands (Samoa), S by E.

Tuesday, November 3, 1846

Breeze moderate and light, variable from N to SE, and light squalls of rain. Steered S and SSW, in company with the Java.

Wednesday, November 4, 1846

Have a gentle breeze at NE. Steered S, in company with the ship Java. Latitude 10° 10’ Longitude 164° 43’

Thursday, November 5, 1846

Have a fine, gentle breeze at E. Steered SSW after 2 PM. Java yet in company. Latitude at noon 12° 12’

Friday, November 6, 1846

With a light breeze at E. Steering SW½S. Saw the eastern of the Navigator Isles (Samoa) at noon. Bearing SW by W.

Saturday, November 7, 1846

Breeze light at ESE. Sailing along to the southward of the land. At 10 AM, saw the Island of  Tutuila, distant 25 miles. Saw two ships to the N. At sunset, shortened sail, and luffed to, heading SSE, the land distant 12 miles, bearing W and WSW, the ship Java within hail of us.        Holt off duty yet.

Sunday, November 8, 1846

Weather fine, and light breeze strong from SE. At daylight, 10 miles NE from the NE point of Tutuila. Kept off. At 7 AM, took a pilot. At 9, entered the harbor in Pago Pago Bay and anchored. The Java come in close after us, and let her anchor go near our stern and run afoul of us, and stove our starboard boat, and otherwise injured us. It is ten years and two months since I was in this harbor, in the bark North America, Capt. Richards. Then all was lewdness and heathenism. Now things are different. The women are chaste and virtuous, and the men are honest and friendly. The missionaries have done wonders in so short a time. Mr. & Mrs. Murray are Scotch, and are Presbyterians. They arrived here in May 1836, and have Laboured here ever since that time. The natives were then savages. Now they are Christians, and can rejoice in the same. After anchoring, we cleared the ship, and made ready to cooper our oil again. At night, have rain.

Monday, November 9, 1846

At 7 AM, turned up the crew to break out the cargo to cooper, and they refused to do it before having liberty. During the day, much rain. One watch go on shore. Got off some jams, and breadfruit, and taro, etc.

Tuesday, November 10, 1846

Continues heavy rain bad weather. One watch on shore. Have bought a small pittance of refreshments, except what each one purchases himself, salt beef and pork, bread, and warm water.

Wednesday, November 11, 1846

Continues rainy. The watch on shore, and myself. Afternoon, weather fine and dry.

Thursday, November 12, 1846

The weather dry and clear. Starboard watch on shore. Got off one load of wood.

Friday, November 13, 1846

The weather dry and fine. Employed in getting off wood. Got off 5 boat loads. The captain bought 2 small pigs,and lost them at night.

Saturday, November 14, or Sunday, November 15, 1846

This is Sunday here. Have a fine day, excepting two or three light showers. At noon, I go on shore to meeting, and Mr. Murray, the missionary, preached to us. We were about 20 from the 3 ships, including 4 belonging on shore. After meeting, I go over the mountain to Fagasa, and had a tedious walk. About 3 miles each way. Return at sunset.

Monday, November 16, 1846

At daylight, get our anchor, and drop down the harbor, and get two more boat loads of wood.  At noon, get under way, and put to sea, with a light breeze. At sunset, steered S by E. The bark Bayard sailed this morning. The Java remains at anchor.

Sunday, November 22, 1846

Since Monday the 16th, we have had a steady strong breeze from the SE and SSE. Steering S. Lay to one night for land. Saw none. At sunrise this day, saw the Island of ‘Eua and Tongatapu. Run down to the west side of it, and Capt. Destin went on shore, but could not get anything because it is Sunday. They are better observers of the Holy day than we are. Capt. Destin returned at 5 o’clock, after two hours absence, and kept off SW by W. We left the Navigator Islands with two pigs, and about one bushel of taro, and some 4 or 5 bunches of bananas. This is our recruit today. We have eat the last pig, and we go on to the old diet, salt meat and hard bread, day after day, morning, noon, and night, with warm water sweetened with molasses. We are bound direct to Sidney, New South Wales. I believe Holt is yet off duty. Latitude of ‘Eua 21° 24’ S Longitude 174° 45’ W

Sunday, November 29, 1846

We have had strong breezes since Sunday the 22nd, and have made a good run. The wind has been about SE, and good weather. Course from S by W to SW by W. Saturday, passed to the west, and in sight of, Norfolk Island in Latitude 29° 02 and Longitude 168° 10 E.  Today, we have the wind light at ESE. Course S by W and SSW. Employed through the week repairing a boat, and sails, and rattling [to add ratlines] rigging. Also, broke out the bone room, intending to bunch the bone. Holt off duty up to this day.

Sunday, December 6, 1846

Since Sunday last, we have had moderate weather. And most of the week, fine weather, and light breeze from the eastward and northward. Employed in rattling the lower rigging, and bunching our bone. Saw a large shoal of sperm whales on Thursday the 3rd, and struck one, and drawed the iron. Friday, have a strong breeze at NNW. Saturday morning, have heavy rain from 4 AM to 9 AM, with variable wind at night. Breeze steady at SE, and we are a going on finely. On Tuesday, we took 2 large black fish, and boiled the blubber yesterday, and got 4 bbls. Today, we have fine, clear weather, and a light 4 knot breeze. Steering W. Latitude at noon (by obs.) 34° 05’ S Longitude at 2½ PM (by chronometer) 155° 30’ E. Distant from Sidney, NSW, 205 miles, and course W. Holt is off duty yet. Saw a sail yesterday, steering to the eastward. Finished bunching bone at 2 PM, and stowed away 127 bunches, estimated at 15,000 pounds. At 4 PM this day, we are in green water.

Tuesday, December 8, 1846

At 4 PM, the lighthouse at the entrance of the harbor of Sidney, Port Jackson, in sight from the masthead, right ahead, distant 20 miles. Breeze light at E, steering W. At 12 o’clock, hauled aback in about 4 miles of the heads. At sunrise, got a pilot, and stood in, with a light air of wind on... 

Wednesday, December 9, 1846

We come to anchor in Sidney Cove, and found several American whalers and English merchant ships laying. This is a large harbor, and secure. Any quantity of shipping may lay here, and a fine, large city, doing a great business.

Thursday, December 10, 1846

Employed in cleaning the outside of the ship. 

Friday, December 11, 1846

Employed painting ship. And we have a plenty of fine beef, and mutton, and vegetables. The ship Splendid of Cold Spring is a laying here with 2500 bbls. of oil, 31 months out.

Saturday, December 12, 1846

Employed painting, and one watch on liberty. The weather is fine and dry. Holt is yet off duty, and has gone on shore tonight. 

Sunday, December 13, 1846 

This day, I am on shore for the first time on liberty. I attended divine service at the Scotch Presbyterian Church in the morning, and in the afternoon at the Catholic, where I made but a short stay. I spent some time in walking through the city. The day was windy, and the dust flew enough to blind me. So far as I have seen of this city of Sidney, I do not like It as well as I expected I should from what I heard of it. I think I see that old monster Joe of ours. Even here among the English, prejudice will against color, wherever you find the white man.

Monday, December 14, 1846

One watch on shore. The other, employed getting water. Afternoon squally. Got in 14 pipes of water.

Tuesday, December 15, 1846

Employed drying and cleaning bone. One watch on shore.

Wednesday, December 16, 1846

Employed with the bone. Afternoon, heavy squall of hail, rain and wind. Larboard watch on shore on liberty.

Saturday, December 17, 1846

Shipped three tons of bone. Sold to Misters Campbell and Company at £130 per ton. We ship 6830 pounds in 72 bundles. At 6 PM, have a heavy squall of rain and wind from the S.

Sunday, December 18, 1846

The day, clear and pleasant and cold. At evening, one watch on shore today on liberty. Came in a large ship yesterday from New Zealand with 900 soldiers. Likewise, several merchantmen. Some from England, and some from the coast.

Monday, December 19, 1846

Got on board, 18 tierces of beef, and 3000 bbls of bread and cabin stores.

Tuesday, December 20, 1846

Employed clearing house and making ready to haul out. Five men missing since last night.

Wednesday, December 21, 1846

At 5 AM, took our anchors, and hauled out into the stream. Come on board, three prisoners to be carried to the US for trial, for setting fire to the ship Canton Packet. Deserted this day, James Thompson, Thomas Burch and Moses Burchell, the two first taking one of the ship’s boats. Afternoon, strong SE, and some rain.

Thursday, December 24, 1846

Got one anchor at 6 AM. Afternoon, got under way, and beat down to Watsons Bay. Wind light, and the ebb tide done, cannot get to sea tonight. Anchored at 5 PM.

Friday, December 25, 1846 Christmas

In the morning, calm and pleasant. Afternoon, have a breeze at NE, but we cannot get a pilot. All gone to keep Christmas day.

Saturday, December 26, 1846

Morning calm. Afternoon, have a fine breeze at N. At 2 o’clock PM, weighed anchor and beat out to sea. In about two hours, passed clear of the heads, and left our pilot at 4 o’clock. At 11 o’clock, have a shift of wind to SW, and squally. Shortened sail.

Sunday, December 27, 1846

Have a strong breeze at SSW. Capt. Destin has set the three prisoners at liberty, and they have agreed to go to work the same as the crew. At six o’clock, have the deck all clear, and anchors and chains stowed away. Half past 6, choose watches anew, and likewise, boats crews. This was meant for Saturday afternoon or Sunday. Sea account. This Sunday, send down the royal yards and mast. At 1 PM, head to the SW, breeze moderates.

Friday, January 1, 1847

The weather has been light and pleasant, with a light breeze from the N & E. Steering SSE and SE. At 7 AM, saw a shoal of sperm whales. At 8, gave chase, but did not strike them. At 2 PM, lowered again, and missed a good chance. At 3, lowered again, got one whale, small one. Got it cut in by sunset.

Saturday, January 2, 1847

Have a strong breeze at N, steering SE and ESE, under short sail. At this day, clearing away the head, which we took on deck whole. Commenced to boil at 6 AM. Near night, some rain and fog, with the wind at NW and W.

Sunday, January 3, 1847

The weather moderate, with a breeze at SW and chilly. Afternoon, got whole topsail on the ship. At sunset, finished boiling, and have about 25 bbls. of oil. Latitude at noon 39° 30’ S

Sunday, January 10, 1847

The forenoon, the weather fine, with a light breeze at W. Steered ESE. Employed repairing sails. The afternoon, the breeze freshens to the NW. At sunset, have a strong whole sail breeze. Took in sail, and lay to, heading WSW, and good, moderate weather until 12 o’clock at night. Mr. Lyons off duty, sick. And, Holt off duty.

Monday, January 11, 1847

At 2 AM, have a strong breeze. Took in the foresail. At 5 AM, called all hands and close-reefed the main topsail, with a strong gale at N in squalls with rain. At 6½ o’clock, the sea heavy. At 8 o’clock, all three boats gone on the larboard side, and some of the davies. The fore  [missing section of page]

We have this forenoon the heaviest gale that we have had the voyage, and have done the most damage. At sunset, moderate, with the wind at W, and cold. By our reckoning, we are not far from New Zealand, and are carrying sail to keep off, and standing sea watches. On Saturday night, we shortened sail and set quarter watches, intending to cruise. But, since the gale, and the loss of our boats, we have stood sea watches and carried sail to get to the southward of New Zealand. With a strong wind, and a heavy sea at SW and WSW.

Tuesday, January 12, 1847

At 7 AM, kept off E by S. At 10 o’clock, hauled up SE, under close-reefed topsails. Afternoon, repaired the foresail, and set it. This day, I lost my quadrant overboard by the ship’s rolling very heavy, thus losing 16½ dollars. At night, by our reckoning, we have the land under our lee, distant 25 miles, and blowing a gale at WSW, with a very heavy sea. Steering SE by S under close-reefed fore and main topsails and foresail.  

Wednesday, January 13, 1847

In the morning at daylight, moderates a little. Kept off, E. At 8 AM, NE, with double reefed main topsail. And, at noon, breeze freshens at NW.

Sunday, January 17, 1847

The weather fine, and a steady breeze. Steering ENE. Saw some finbacks. Employed repairing a boat, etc. This morning, we have eight men off duty, sick, or lazy. Holt yet off duty.

Sunday, January 24, 1847

Since Sunday last, we have had good weather, and most of the week fine, and a steady breeze from N to W and from S to W, and have cruised to the eastward. This day, fine and pleasant, with a light breeze at W. Steering E by N. Have only two men sick. Have not seen any right whales yet. Latitude at noon 46° 38’ Longitude at 2 PM 167° 29’ W

Having passed the opposite meridian the last week, we lose a day in account yesterday, and the day before were Saturday with us. This makes the eighth time that we have crossed this meridien this voyage, and it is to be hoped the last time. Put out the waist boat this morning. We have now our three last boats on the cranes.

Sunday, February 28, 1847

This day, we are laying to in a strong gale from SW. And, we are between Staten Land and the Falkland Islands, having doubled Cape Horn on Thursday last. Since which, we have had light and head winds. Saw a ship of Staten Land on Friday and Saturday, bound to the northward. At sunset, quite moderate. Made sail, and steered NW. At 12 o’clock, main top  gallant sail set, and steering N. From 12 to 4, nearly calm.

Since we passed New Zealand, we have seen whales but once, and lowered once.

Monday, March 1, 1847

We have fine weather, with a light breeze at SW and W, steering N under all sail. At noon, saw one of the Falkland Islands, one point off our lee bow.

Since passing New Zealand, we have seen five ships, and spoken only two. [Which, by the longitudes, would have all been before reaching Cape Horn.] One in Longitude 143° W, the Henry Lee of Sag Harbor, 2600 bbls. The other, in Longitude 80° W, the William Wirt of Fairhaven, 4 months out, 25 bbls. sperm. Same day, saw another ship to the N & E.

[Thus concludes the narrative entries of this journey. The Merrimack returned to New London on Saturday, May 29, 1847. The trip yielded 25 bbls. sperm oil worth $793.01, 2975 bbls.whale oil worth $33,736.68, and 5000 lbs. whale bones worth $1550.00, for a total value of $36,080.59.]

[EXPENSE LEDGER]

[accounts receivable]

John Billings Dr. [Debere, “to owe” (debit)] April 1, 1845  By balance in trade  $1.12½ 

X Royal J. Kimball Dr. April 1845 For Hawaii moss for bed $3.00 Paid

  1. N. Williams Dr. April 1845 For moss for a bed $1.25

X Royal J. Kimball Dr. May 4 by one pair of boots $4.50 Paid

X July 8, 1845 Jack the Ship Keeper to 5½ yards of heavy duck at $2.25 Recd Payment $ 2.25

December 18, 1845 Walter Sackett by 5 yards of duck 30 cents $1.50

December 18, 1845 John Harris by 3 yards of duck 90 cents

January 14, 1846 Isaac Allen Dr. by two pair of satinette pants and two flannel shirts $13.15

January 14, 1846 Charles Watrous Dr. By 7 yards of duck 30 cents $2.10

[accounts payable]

  1. Olney to the ship Merrimac Dr.

April 20, 1845  for two pair of light shoes 

May 1, 1845  one blanket of the ship

October 24, 1845 one Bedford shirt of the ship for the Steward $2.25

November 2, 1845 Received of Capt. Destin at Lahaina $ cash $2.00

November 11 Honolulu Received cash of Capt. Destin $2.00

November 15, 1845 Received of Capt Destin cash at Honolulu $2.00

February 15, 1846 one pair of stocking from the slop chest $00.50 cents

January 14, 1846 Bought of Charles Watrous one pistol, balls and mold, and one canister of powder  $4-00

October 5, 1846 Sold William the Steward one pistol and fixings

Returned $4.00 cash of Capt. Destin at Sidney, New South Wales  £2.10s.

[Ship General Williams of New London]

[A personal journal by a member of the crew, identified as: Frederick Huey]

[Per the record here on Thursday, September 16, 1852, the ship General Williams departed New London on Tuesday, September 16, 1851.]

Remarks Friday, July 30, 1852

Ship General Williams, Arctic Sea, July 30. Thick, foggy weather. Spoke the ship Vesper and heard of the loss of Capt. House by a whale in the straits 10 days before, had not taken any whales since June. Same day, spoke the bark Clement. Employed boiling. Saw two bowheads, and chased. Also, any quantity of rip jacks. Streaks of clear weather. Saw 4 or 5  ships, one or two boiling. At 5½ PM, got among the ice and in wearing, run slap into a large cake of very thick and heavy ice. Ship going about 5 knots, which brought her to a dead stand, all by the stupidity of Comstock, the first officer in cunning, when he ordered the helm hard a starboard, when he meant to a port, Capt. Forsyth at the time on deck. I believe the ship did not receive a great injury, although she got a very heavy blow, which made her shake like a feather and frightened a great part of the ship’s company. Many ships could not have stood it and floated after it, but the good old General is good stuff.

Foggy weather. Employed boiling. Mr. Comstock in a jealous mad fit. Commenced a row with the third mate, and finally to myself, and did not like my keeping the ship’s journal. And Capt. Forsyth, to gratify him, took it from me and kept it himself.

Remarks Sunday, August 1, 1852

Fog in streaks. Cruised N & E and S & E. Saw several ships, and two boiling. Continues very foggy to end of this 24 hours.

Remarks Monday, August 2, 1852

The weather light with thick fog. Saw and chased 3 bowheads, with 3 hours clear weather in the first part. Saw the bark Clement chasing whales. Continued very foggy to end of these 24 hours. Plenty rip jacks in sight.

Remarks Tuesday, August 3, 1852

Weather light and calm with thick fog. Came to anchor to keep clear of the ice. Light streaks. Saw 6 ships and one boiling. So ends this day.

Remarks Wednesday, August 4, 1852

This day, fogs and light streaks. Saw one bowhead in the fog. Employed stowing in the main hatch. Last part got underway with a  light air and baffling. Thirteen ships in sight, one boiling. Saw the ice to the N & W. Saw some rip jacks. So ends this day. Quite clear.

Remarks Thursday August 5, 1852

First part, quite clear weather half of the time. Chocked off the main hatch. Spoke [spoke to] the bark North America, had just burned up her mainsail with a wad from a swivel gun.  Middle part, foggy. Spoke and gammed with the ship Rhone of Sidney, one whale. Last part, stood in close to the ice. At 9½ AM fog clears off. Saw 3 bowheads,and chased until noon. Saw 4 other ship, chasing whales. Some fog squalls. So ends these 24 hours.

Remarks Friday, August 6, 1852

First part, chased whales, and struck one, and drawed [pulled out of the whale]. Some fog. Last part, chasing whales and had two. Missed. Weather clear and very fine. Much Ice. About 20 ships in sight, and all whaling. Saw two ships take and cut whales. So ends this day. Plenty of bowheads. Latitude 67° 45’ Longitude 172° 45’

Remarks Saturday, August 7, 1852

These 24 hours, fine clear weather and plenty whales. Very shy. Chased all day, but could not strike. Saw 3 ships cutting, and 5 a boiling. Cruised in sight of the ice. So ends this day. No fog, and but little wind and some calms.  Latitude 67° 50’ Longitude 173° 10’

Remarks Sunday, August 8, 1852

This day begins clear with a light breeze at the eastward. Chasing whales until 4½ PM. At 6 comes up thick fog. Lay aback. Last part, some light streaks. Saw 26 ships, 19 boiling, and two others cutting. Ends with a calm. So ends these 24 hours. Latitude 68° Longitude 173° West                         

Remarks Monday, August 9, 1852

Begins with a calm and streaks of fog. Chased one bowhead. And boarded the North America, a boiling. Middle part clear. Cruised to the N & E. Saw one bowhead and many rip jacks. Last part, cruised to the S & W, and chased 3 bowheads. Spoke the ships Tybee  and Hannibal,  9 and 10 whales. So ends this day. Latitude 67° 55’ Longitude 173° 15’

Remarks Tuesday, August 10, 1852

First part, fine clear weather and a light breeze at south. Cruised to the westward and saw the ice. And chased one whale. Very shy. Gammed with the Tybee. And chased one whale. Weather very fine and a gentle breeze. So ends this day. Last part, chased several whales and could not strike.

Remarks Wednesday, August 11, 1852

First part, chased three times and no strike. Saw many ships boiling. Last part, saw the ice. Wind shifts to WNW and blows fresh. Saw one whale. So ends. Another 12 whales.

Remarks Thursday, August 12, 1852

First part, light wind at WNW. Ten sail in sight, and 5 boiling. Saw the Hannibal. And chased one whale. The latter part, have a fresh breeze from the south and east. Steered NW & NNW. Spoke the bark Columbus of Sag Harbor. Seven whales. So ends this day.

Remarks Friday, August 13, 1852

First part, fresh breeze with haze at W & NW. Shortened sail and lay too. Latter part, quite moderate. Columbus and Bengal in sight. At 3 AM made sail and steered NNE by the wind. At 7 AM saw ice to the N & E. At 10 AM spoke the Bengal of New London, 7 whales this season. Gammed all day. And kept along the broken ice to the eastward. With a light breeze from NW and a smooth sea. And no whales. So end this day. Gamming.

Remarks Saturday, August 14, 1852

First part, light wind, fog, rain and calms. The middle part, kept along the ice to the eastward in company with the Bengal. Latter part, wind light from the southward at 11½ AM. Saw two bowheads going quick to the westward. Did not lower our boats, but the Bengal did. Ends with good weather.

Remarks Sunday, August 15, 1852

First part, saw a dead whale and got two first rate jig irons out of it. Gammed with the Bengal. And kept on to the eastward. Weather light and cloudy. Latter part, some fog. No ice in sight. So ends this day. Latitude (by obs. [by observation]) 70° 27’ N Longitude 165° 28’ W

Remarks Monday, August 16, 1852

First part, light wind at SE. Saw two bowheads but once, then going quick to the westward. The last part, good breeze at S & E. Steering to the eastward. At 6 AM saw the land near Icy Cape. Low and flat. Stood in within 10 miles and tacked to the S & W. At 11 some fog. So ends this day. Latitude (by act.) 71° N

Remarks Tuesday, August 17, 1852

First part, any quantity of rip jacks and walruses. Saw two bowheads going to the southward quick. Chased with one boat until lost sight of in the fog. Latter part, steered to the S & W with a five knot breeze at NNW. Some rain. Passed through many gams of walruses and some rip jacks. So ends this day. Latitude (by obs.) 70° 10’ N Longitude 165° 00’ W

Remarks Wednesday, August 18, 1852

First part, good weather with a gentle whole sail breeze at N. Steered SW by W by compass. Latter part, have a fresh breeze at N. Steered to the S & W in sight of the icy barrier. Saw two ships. And spoke the ship James Maury of New Bedford, 5 whales. Gammed. All the day, weather cloudy and cold. So ends this day. Latitude at noon 70° 09’ Longitude

Remarks Thursday, August 19, 1852

First part, fresh northerly wind and cold. Cruised to the N & W up to the ice and then to the eastward in company with the Maury. Parted company at 8 PM, she going E and we west. Middle and last parts, steered westward with a good breeze at noon close up to the packed ice stretching SSE and NNW. Weather fine but cool. So ends this day. Latitude (by obs.) 70° 06’ N Longitude (by chronometer) 176° W

Remarks Friday, August 20, 1852

First part, fine clear weather and a gentle breeze at north. Cruised along the ice coast to the S & E.  Saw no whales. Middle part, got into a bay in the ice, 10 miles deep to the S & E, which took us all of the last part to beat out of. Some fog which freezes on the rigging. Latitude at noon 69° 04’

Remarks Saturday, August 21, 1852

First part, cleared the ice at 2 PM and steered to the eastward with good weather. At 9 PM spoke a French ship cutting a stinker. Middle part, lay too while dark. Last part, light airs and calms. So ends this 24 hours. Latitude 68°42’ Longitude 176° 00’ W

Remarks Sunday, August 22, 1852

First part, commenced a light breeze to the SE. Steered to the N & E. Saw 3 ships to the S & W. Middle part, fresh breeze at ESE. Headed NE under easy sail. Last part, breeze fresh. Saw 8 or ten ships, some headed N, some W, and others E. Spoke the ship India, 10 whales, steering to the westward. Passed near the ship Gustave of Le Havre, France. Weather cold. So ends this day. Latitude 69° 17’ Longitude 171° 56’

Remarks Monday, August 23, 1852

First part, breeze fresh at ESE. Heading NE. Five ships in sight, headed to the eastward and north. At 9 PM saw ice to the N. Tacked to the south. Last part, saw from ten to fifteen ships, and two a boiling, most of them steering to the N & W. After 1 steered to the N & E. With a fresh breeze and good weather, but no whales. So ends this day. (Sent [sent down] mizzen top gallant yards.)  Latitude 69° 27’ Longitude 169° 00’

Remarks Tuesday, August 24, 1852

First, gamming with five ships: the James Edward, 9 whales, Monongahela, 18, Republic of Bremen [a German ship], 9, Columbus of Fairhaven, 6, Nile of San Francisco, California, 8 whales. The middle and last parts, fine weather and a gentle breeze. At 6 AM tacked to the S & E. Saw two humpbacks. At 10 saw the land, the James Edward in sight. So ends this day. Latitude at noon 69° 40’ N Longitude 169° 30’

Remarks Wednesday, August 25, 1852

First part, gammed with the James Edward, Capt. Luce. The land near (Cape Lisburne), 15 miles to the S & E of us. Middle part, light air. Steered SW. Last part, near the cape, to the N & W. Light airs. Three ships in sight. Saw a canoe in shore heading towards the ship. A breeze sprong up and it did not come to us. So ends this day. Lat 68°-50’ N  Long. 170° 00 W

Remarks Thursday August 26, 1852

Fine weather. Employed repairing sails and bent a new fore topsail. Steered SW by S with a five knot breeze in the middle part. Last part, at 6 AM saw 3 bowheads and lowered for them. Could not get hold of them. Come on board at at 8 o’clock. Lowered again at 10. No success. About 15 ships in sight, some cutting and boiling. So ends this day. Latitude 68° 16’ Longitude 170° 10’

Remarks Friday, August 27, 1852

First part, fine weather. Cruised to the N & W and S & E. Saw one or two bowheads and lowered at 8 PM. Same time, spoke the ship Navigator, 13 whales and boiling. About 3 ships in sight, 4 cutting and 10 or 12 a boiling. The Navigator reports seeing thousands of whales this day. We have seen a great many rip jacks. Middle part, fresh breeze. Last part, at 4 PM saw some bowheads. Lowered our boats at 5 and chased till 8. Could not strike. Saw more going too quick to chase. Breeze fresh at NE. Cruised eastward and westward to end of these 24 hours.

Remarks Saturday, August 28, 1852

First part, thick fogg. Saw nothing. Middle, fresh breeze at N & NNE. Headed NW and ENE under short sail. Last, strong breeze. Saw some bowheads, but did not lower for them. Saw one ship boiling. So ends this day.

Remarks Sunday, August 29, 1852

These 24  hours, strong breeze at N. Cruised to the WNW and ENE. Saw many bowheads and rip jacks. Chased, but could not strike. Sea quite rugged. Spoke the ship Levant’s boats, she hails 11 whales. The weather rather thick. Can see two miles. So ends these 24 hours.

Remarks Monday, August 30, 1852

First part, chased bowheads, but could not strike. Passed close to the Bengal, stowing down. Saw 8 other ships, one boiling. Middle & last parts, foggy and light wind. So ends these 24 hours. Latitude 68° 5’

Remarks Tuesday, August 31, 1852

First part, foggy. Saw no whales, and but 2 ships. Middle part, fog and light wind. Last part, but little fog. Saw plenty whales. Struck two, and saved one. Saw 8 ships, one cutting and three boiling. This day ends with fine weather and twelve ships in sight, all chasing whales.  So ends this day, with a dead whale. Latitude (by obs.) 68° 00’ Longitude (by obs.) 68° 00’  Longitude (by chronometer) 171° 30’ W

Remarks Wednesday, September 1, 1852

First part, got the whale alongside at 1 PM, and commenced cutting at 2. Finished at 5 PM and commenced boiling. Eighteen ships in sight, 5 boiling and others chasing whales.  Weather fine clear light wind at NW and some whales in sight. Middle part, calm. Boiling. Last part, some fog. Saw great many “rip jacks.” No “bowheads.” Also about 20 ships, and 3 of them a boiling. This day ends with clear and pleasant weather. Latitude (by obs.) 67° 39’ Longitude (by chronometer) 171° 40’ W

Remarks Thursday, September 2, 1852

First part, fine light weather. Saw three or four “bowheads” and chased once. Saw several other ships chasing, but none take any. The middle part, a light breeze at N & NNE. Employed boiling. And ship heading eastward and westward. Middle part, light air at NE.  Last part, light and baffling. Cruised to the N. Saw and boarded the Benjamin Morgan, cutting a two hundred barrel whale. Saw one other ship cutting. Forty ships in sight, and not more than 6 boiling. We finished boiling at 10 AM. Turned up 110 bbls. So ends this day. Cloudy. 

Remarks Friday, September 3, 1852

First part, have a moderate breeze at ENE. Cruised to the N. Saw no bowheads. Plenty rip jacks and ships. Passed one ship, full colors flying “fore and aft,” boiling and bound off.  Middle part, stood on to the N & E with a fresh breeze part of the time and quite clear. The moon and stars shining quite bright, the first time for four months. Also, the northern lights quite bright. Last part, fresh breeze veering from the E to SSE. Cruised to the eastward. Saw no whales. Saw one ship cutting, and one a boiling, and 8 others. Employed stowing down in the fore hatch starboard side. Weather clear, dry. So ends the day. Latitude 68° 46’ N  Longitude 171° 00’ W

Remarks Saturday, September 4, 1852

First part, fresh breeze. Finished stowing down at 5 PM 100 bbls. Middle and last parts, fresh breeze veering from SSE to SSW. Cruised to the ESE & westward. Saw 10 or 15 ships, some  4 or 5 boiling. So ends the day.  

Remarks Sunday, September 5, 1852

First part, from 12 to 4 strong wind at SSW. Furled the fore and mizzen topsails. Some rain.  Saw 8 ships boiling. Middle part, moderates down fine and clear. The wind veering to SW  Last part, to 8 AM calm, then light breeze at SE. Fifty-three ships in sight, 18 boiling. At noon saw 3 bowheads. So ends this day. Latitude 65° 10’ Longitude 171° 00’ 

Remarks Monday, September 6, 1852

First part, moderate whole sail breeze at S. Saw great many bowheads going very quick SE. Chased all the afternoon and could not strike one. Plenty of ships all around us, chasing, but got no whales. Saw some rip jacks. Cruised to the S & W. Middle part, fresh breeze at S. Stood to the westward until 12 o’clock and tacked to the eastward. Saw whales after night fall a quarter of a mile from the ship, middle part. Last part, saw 3 ships cutting. Saw 3 bowheads and lowered and chased but once. Weather good and wind light. So ends this day. Thirty ships in sight at noon. Latitude 68° 15’ N  Longitude 171° 13’ W

Remarks Tuesday, September 7, 1852

Begins with a fresh breeze at SE. Saw 2 or 3 bowheads and lowered once. About 40 ships in sight, but few a boiling. At 6 PM  spoke the ship New England, Capt. Pendleton of New London, 15 whales. Saw the ship Ocean of Providence, RI, Capt. Swift, 27 whales. Middle part, moderate with some fog. Ship headed NE until 12. Wore ship and headed to the S & W. Last part, breeze light. Made all sail. Saw a barge cutting. Weather hazy. Saw some “rip jacks” at 11. Saw 3 or four bowheads. Breeze fresh and much sea. Lowered our boats and struck about noon. So ends this day. Latitude 68° 00’ N Longitude 171° 00’ W

Remarks Wednesday, September 8, 1852

Begins with good whaling weather. Got our whale. Killed and got alongside at 3PM. Got dinner, and wore around, and began to cut about 4. Sea bad. Had to cut before the wind. Finished about 8 o’clock. Wind died away. I saw ship Ocean with a whale alongside at 12. Middle part, commenced boiling. Last part light, wind at ESE. Made sail heading NE at 9. Wore to south. Saw several ships whaling. But saw but one bowhead. So ends this day. Boiling.

Remarks Thursday, September 9, 1852

First part, saw 3 or four bowheads and chased. Wind light at ESE and some rain and thick weather. At 7 the New England passed close to us. Middle part, some rain and not much wind. Last part, thick fog with a moderate breeze at NNW. Cruised NE & WNW. Saw some  “rip jacks.” Employed boiling.  So ends this day.

Remarks Friday, September 10, 1852

Begins foggy and a stiff breeze at NNW. Saw some ships under double reefed topsails. Middle part, furled the fore and mizzen topsails and lay under double reefed main and fore sail. Boiling. Cruised to the N & W and N & E. Last part, finished boiling at 4 AM and turned up 140 bbls. Weather rather thick. Several ships in sight and some chasing whales. Saw one bowhead going quick to the north. Cruised to the eastward. So ends this day.

Remarks Saturday, September 11, 1852

Begins with a stiff breeze at N. Heading ENE. Saw and chased 3 bowheads. Sea rough and weather thick. Plenty “rip jacks.” Around at 6 PM spoke ship Albion of Fairhaven, Capt. Sowle, 13 whales, including 2 rip jacks and 2 right whales. Also at 7 spoke the ship Monongahela, Capt. Seabury. Middle past, head WNW until 12, and then to ENE. Last part, clear weather and a strong breeze. Employed stowing down. At 11 spoke ship Betsey Williams of Stonington, Capt. Pendleton, 10 whales. Also, ship Bramin of New Bedford, 10 whales [Lost in the Arctic, September 25, 1852]. Saw several other ships. So ends this day. Headed to the N & E.

Remarks Sunday, September 12, 1852

Begins with strong breeze. The ship under double reefed topsails. Heading to the eastward. Spoke the ship Phoenix, Capt. Chas Brewster, of New London, 14 whales, had picked up 8 dead ones. Lay aback and “gammed” with the Betsy and the Phoenix until night, the weather not fit to whale. Finished stowing at 2 PM, 120 bbls. Saw no bowheads this day. Middle part, at 12 headed to the westward. Breeze still strong. Last part, saw some bowheads and lowered once. Wind strong and sea rough. Spoke the Phoenix at 10 AM and Capt. Forsythe went on board and spent the day. Weather clear. So ends this day. Gamming. Latitude 67° 58’ N Longitude 169° 00’ W

Remarks Monday, September 13, 1852

Begins with clear weather and moderating. Ship under double reefed topsails. Heading to the westward. Several ships in sight. Saw the Alexander, Capt. Ryan, of New Bedford, 9 whales. Saw two ships boiling. Middle part, moderate and clear. Northern lights very bright. Headed to the east after 12 o’clock. Last part, thick fog until 10 AM, then clears off. Nine ships in sight, some chasing whales. Cruised to the westward. So ends this day.

Remarks Tuesday, September 14, 1852

Begins with good whaling weather. Saw and chased one bowhead. Saw one ship take one just at night. Spoke the Phoenix at sunset. Capt. Brewster came on board and got some potatoes. Twenty ships in sight, and 5 boiling. Breeze light. Took in the light sails and hauled up the courses at dark. Comes on thick again at 1. Headed to the N & E in the middle part. Last part, good weather with a good whole sail breeze at N. Made all sail and cruised westward until 11 o’clock, then to the eastward. Saw no bowheads. Thirty ships in sight and boiling, one cutting. So ends this day. Latitude 67° 50’ Longitude 168° 35’

Remarks Wednesday, September 15, 1852

Begins with good weather. Saw and chased one bowhead 3 hours. Saw several other ships chasing. At sunset, heading WNW. Took in the light sails and hauled up the courses. Great many "rip jacks” abound this day. Middle part, quite moderate. At 12 headed ENE. Last part, fine light weather. At 6½ AM saw 3 bowheads and lowered our 3 boats and chased all day and could not strike. Saw plenty whales. About 20 ships in sight and all chasing. Did not see any take whales. Several boiling and two cutting in the morning. So ends this day. Latitude 67° 45’ Longitude 167° 50’

Remarks Thursday, September 16, 1852

This day closes our first year out. Weather fine and light. Chasing whales until sunset. Spoke the ship Alexander Coffin’s boats, reports 1700 bbls. of oil this season. Middle part, calm and clear. Last part, fine light weather and a light breeze from southward. Saw number of rip jacks and a few bowheads and lowered and chased at 11½ o’clock. Did not get near. About 30 ships in sight, most all boiling or cutting. Saw one ship take a whale, the Otaheite of Bremen. So ends this day. Latitude 67° 49’ Longitude 171° 40’

Remarks Friday, September 17, 1852

First part, fine weather and a light southerly breeze. Saw several bowheads and chased 3 hours. Spoke the ship Lagoda‘s boat, who reports 18 whales and wants one to fill. Middle part, lay aback. Calm. Last part, gentle breeze from the northward. Cruised to the eastward. Saw 3 bowheads and chased one. Could not strike. Boarded the Benjamin Morgan, 8 whales, and boiling. Saw the Lagoda take her last whale. Saw 30 ships.

Remarks Saturday. September 18, 1852

Begins with light northerly winds and cloudy. Saw 3 bowheads and chased 2 hours. Spoke the ship Isaac Hicks, 14 whales, and boiling, had struck 39 this season. Saw 3 ships cutting. (Cruised to the eastward.) Middle part, lay aback. Light airs, calms, foggy and rain. Several ships in sight boiling. Last part, weather rather hazy at times. Saw 3 bowheads. Got one alongside of the ship at 11 o’clock and commenced cutting. At 11½ o’clock saw the ship South Boston, about full, and cutting and boiling. So ends this day. Cutting.

Remarks Sunday, September 19, 1852

Begins with very good weather and a light westerly wind and cloudy. Twenty ships in sight, and mostly boiling. Finished cutting at 4 o’clock. Cleared up the decks and commenced boiling at 6 o’clock. Very large whale. Lay aback middle part, with light baffling wind and hazy. Last part, light southerly wind and thick fog. Lay aback. So ends this day. Boiling.                                                                                                    

Remarks Monday, September 20, 1852

Begins with thick fog. At one o’clock began to break away. Saw 3 ships cutting. At 2 lowered for a bowhead. Chased until sunset. Could not strike. Gentle breeze at SSE. Cruised to the eastward. Thirty ships in sight. All but 3 a boiling. Middle part, lay aback. Heading to the E with a clear starlight night. Last part, fine clear weather. Cruised to the N & E. Saw 3 ships take whales alongside and commenced to cut: the Chandler Price, bark Lark,and ship Seine. So ends this day.

Remarks Tuesday, September 21, 1852

Begins with a fresh breeze at south. Cruised to the westward. Saw the ship Orozimbo of New Bedford take a whale. And at 4 o’clock saw one bowhead, the first today. Lowered two boats. Went on to the whale and missed getting fast. Spoke the ship Brookline of New London, Capt. Norrie, 19 whales,  2500 bbls. Middle part, moderate. Lay aback. Last part, light wind at W & NW. At 6 o’clock saw 2 bowheads. Lowered the boats, but saw them no more. Finished boiling at 9 o’clock, turned up 200 bbls. Weather clear, but much swell from NW. So ends this day.

Remarks Wednesday, September 22, 1852

Begins with a light breeze at SE. Saw 1 bowhead and chased. At sunset gammed with the Brookline, 19 whales, Chandler Price, 12 whales, Hannibal, 15 whales, and Nile of San Francisco, full. Middle part, foggy. Lay aback. Last part, foggy. Stowing down. Wind light at SE. Heading ENE. Latitude at noon 68° 40’ Longitude 170° 14’ 

Remarks Thursday, September 23, 1852

Begins with fine clear and dry light and smooth weather. Finished stowing down 180 bbls. (the last whale) at 5 PM and cleared up the decks. Have not seen a whale this day of any kind. Middle part, quite good weather. Lay aback under double reefed topsails. Spoke ship John Howland, New Bedford, 6 whales. Last part, blows strong from NE. Lay to under close-reefed main topsails. Saw 6 ships, one boiling. So ends this day.

Remarks Friday, September 24, 1852

First part, blows a strong NE gale. The ship laying to, heading E. Five ships in sight. Saw some “rip jacks.” Middle part, the gale continues and strengthens with rain and snow. Last part, thick snowstorm. Sea very heavy. Ship laying to, heading E under close-reefed main topsail. Only 1 ship in sight, and she heading to the N & W. So ends this day.

Remarks Saturday, September 25, 1852

Begins with a strong NE gale. Lay to, heading E. Some snow and rain and thick. At 6 PM wore ship and headed NW. Middle part, the gale continues unabated. Last part, rather increases. Very heavy sea. Five ships in sight. Laying to. Weather rather hazy. So ends. No observations this day. Cloudy at noon.

Remarks Sunday, September 26, 1852

Beginning, with a strong NE gale. At 6 PM wore ship and headed to the eastward. Saw two ships under close-reefed topsails and reefed foresail, 3 others laying to. Middle part, sleet and rain, the gale continuing. Last part, moderates with thick weather. So ends this 24 hours. Set close-reefed topsails and fore sails.

Remarks Monday, September 27, 1852

Begins with thick weather with occasional light streaks. Saw two ships, one a boiling. The weather has abated. Set the foresail and close-reefed fore and mizzen topsails. Middle part, quite moderate and clear of fog. Last part, light breeze and still at NE. Set the jib and whole topsails and headed to the S & E with very thick fog. After 10 o'clock AM 2 ships in sight this morning. Sounded and got 20 fathoms of water. So ends these 24 hours, with no observation.

Remarks Tuesday, September 28, 1852

Begins with a very thick fog, and a light breeze at NE. Steering E & ESE. At 4½ PM mostly calm. Closed up the sails and anchored with our small stream anchor. At 5 the fog clears off and we were only about 4 miles from the land under our lee. Hove up and made sail, heading NW with a light breeze at NNE. We had 20 fathoms of water hard bottom. At 12 M wore to the ENE. At 2 again wore to the NW. Breeze strong. Reefed fore and mizzen topsails. Saw 2 ships at sunset to the westward, heading to the eastward. Last part, at 4½ AM kept off to the SW with a strong breeze. At 7 saw land 6 miles off, bearing WSW and low. Sounded. Got 15 fathoms. Weather thick. Hauled to the westward by the wind. Got up one chain cable and bent to the anchor, with wind direct on shore and heavy sea. Bent a new fore topmast stay sail and put the ship under double reefed topsails and fore sail and main spencer, with quite a gale. Saw the land under our lee all the forenoon from 6 to 10 miles off. At noon got an observation which gave our Latitude 67° 22’ N, which brings us to the conclusion that we are off the Asiatic coast, where we supposed ourselves on the American. So ends these 24 hours. Latitude 67° 22’

Remarks Wednesday, September 29, 1852

Begins with a fresh gale and thick weather. At 1½ PM wore ship and headed ENE, with the land under our lee, and a heavy sea heaving us on. At 4½ PM saw a ship astern coming up with us. Sounded frequently and got from 15 to 18 fathoms of water. Middle part, kept by the wind, heading ENE until 10 o’clock. Saw the land under our lee. Called all hands and wore ship and headed NW by W with a very heavy sea. Set the main sail. At 1 o’clock shipped a heavy sea, which broke down the bow boat. Called all hands and succeeded in saving the boat. Had to take in the main sail. At 5 called all hands, and ship to the eastward. Saw a ship pass us, heading to the eastward. Last part, have frequent squalls of snow, the wind about north and yet blowing a gale, and the land in sight to leeward. Saw 4 ships. At noon, has moderated so that we have set the main sail and jib. And we are off Cape Serdtse-Kamen, 58 miles NW of Cape East [Cape Dezhnev], 5 miles only from the shore. So ends these 24 hours. Latitude 67° 18’ N Longitude 171° 49’ W  

Remarks Thursday, September 30, 1852

Begins with a strong breeze at N. At 2 o’clock we cleared Cape Kamen and kept off E for Cape East. The ship Orozimbo 4 miles, astern steering eastward, and one ship ahead steering eastward. At sunset, distant from the land 15 miles. (Shortened sail.) Middle part, steered E until 12, and hauled a back until 1. Saw East Cape to the S & W. Kept off SSE and passed into Bering Strait at 4 o’clock AM and steered S by W under all sail, with a strong breeze at NNW with squalls of snow and freezing cold. Ice-making on deck. Ship Orozimbo 6 miles ahead, steering southward under all sail. Last part, have a fine steady fresh breeze at N, steering S by W under all sail. At noon, set the fore topsail studding sail. Weather cloudy. At noon, Latitude 65° 08’ N Longitude 170° 40’ W

Remarks Friday, October 1, 1852

Begins with good weather and a steady northerly wind. Steered southward with the land in plain sight 15 or 20 miles off. At 4½ PM spoke the Orozimbo, Capt. Johnson, 14 whales. “Gammed’ until 7 o’clock. Middle part, kept in company, making a SSW course. Breeze fresh. Carried all sail. Last part at 6 AM, Cape “Nosh.” Bore NW, and St. Lawrence Island (south part) east. Breeze freshens at NNE. Ship Orozimbo 8 miles ahead. So ends. Some snow squalls. Latitude (by D.R.[dead reckoning]) 62° 49’ Longitude 174° 38’

Remarks Saturday, October 2, 1852

Begins with a strong breeze and increasing to a gale. At 3 PM reefed fore and mizzen topsails, furled jib, main sail and main top gallant sail. The Orozimbo 10 miles ahead. Middle part, have a strong gale. Run under double reefed topsails and fore sail. Course S by W. Last part, the gale continues with squalls of rain and mist. So ends this day. Latitude (by D.R). 60° 02’ Longitude 178° 00’ W

Remarks Sunday, October 3, 1852

Begins with strong NE gale and cloudy and rain squalls. Middle part, the gale moderates with squalls of thin rain. Course SSW. Last part, the wind continues to die away and cants to N and NNW with squalls of snow and hail. At 7 AM set jib and main sail and mizzen topsail. So ends the day. Latitude (by obs.) 57° 15’ N Longitude (by chronometer) 178° E

Remarks, Monday, October 4, 1852

Begins with quite moderate weather. Some light snow squalls from NW. Course SW under single reefed topsails. Middle part, most of the time wind very light and the moon and stars out. Last part, wind light and baffling with some clear sky. One sail in sight to the westward. Employed splicing the jib stay, etc. So ends the day. Latitude 55° 40’ N Longitude 175° E

Remarks Tuesday, October 5, 1852

Begins with strong gusts of wind and rain and hail squalls from westward. Kept by the wind to the S & W. Middle part, strong double reef breeze variable from W to NW. Kept by the wind, making a SW course. Last part, some strong squalls with rain, hail and snow, and some clear weather. So ends this 24 hours. Latitude (by obs.) at noon 54° 10’ N Longitude 173° 18’

Remarks Wednesday, October 6, 1852

Begins with good moderate weather and a steady breeze at NW. Ship heading SW under double reef topsails and courses. At sunset wind dies away. Made all sail. Saw the westernmost of the Fox Islands, bearing S, distant 50 miles. Middle part, dies away to a calm. Last part, have a light breeze at NE. Steered SSW. Five ships in sight. So ends these 24 hours. Fine weather. (Bent a new mizzen topsail.) Latitude 53° 07’ Longitude (by chronometer) 171°  

Remarks Thursday, October 7, 1852

Begins with light weather and nearly calm. Steering to the southward past the west end of the island of Kiska of the Fox Chain, distant 25 miles. Five ships in sight. Middle part, light air until 12. After, have a fresh breeze from ESE. Last part, increases and squally at E. Single reefed at 10 AM. Four ships in sight at noon. Took in the main top gallant sail. So ends. Steering S by E. Latitude at noon (by obs.) 62° 01’ N Longitude 172° 00’

Remarks Friday, October 8, 1852

Begins with a fresh gale in squalls at E. At 1 o’clock furled the main sail and jib and double-reefed the top sails and found the main topsail yard “sprung.” At 4 close-reefed fore and mizzen and furled the main topsail and fore sail. Middle part, blows a heavy gale with some rain. Last part, the gale abates and at noon quite moderate but a thick fog. So ends these 24 hours.

Remarks Saturday, October 9, 1852

Begins with a moderate gale and a heavy swell, the wind veering to ENE. Made sail, and heading SE. Have a thick fog. Middle part, continues rather moderate. Set the jib and let out one reef from the top sails. Last part, strong breeze at NNE in squalls with fog. Course SE by E. So ends this day.

Remarks Sunday, October 10, 1852

Begins with a strong breeze at N and squalls of fog. We have a very ugly cross sea and swell. Middle part, strong breeze at N and squally, and we are making a fine run. Some rain. Last part, rather less wind, but an ugly sea. Wind cants to NW. So ends this day with the sun out. Latitude (by obs.) 47° 17’ N Longitude 174° 40’ E

Remarks Monday, October 11, 1852

Begins with a strong breeze at NW. Course SE by E. Rather squally. Set the main top gallant sail over double reefed main topsail. Middle part, a good whole sail breeze at NW and clear weather. Last part, fine weather. Made all sail at 6 AM, studding sails, etc. So ends. Latitude (by obs.) 44° 57’ Longitude 177° 20’ E

Remarks Tuesday, October 12, 1852

Begins with good weather and a steady whole sail breeze at NW. Steering SE by E½E by compass. Middle part, steady breeze at NW. Last part, cloudy but good weather and a steady light NW wind, with a fine run. Steering ESE. So, to end. Latitude (by obs.) 43° 07’ Longitude 174° 30’ E

Remarks Wednesday, October 13, 1852

Begins with good and cloudy weather with a light and steady NW wind. Middle part, the wind cants to the northward and increases. Last part, cants to the NNE with a gentle breeze. Steering ESE to end of this day. Cloudy. No observations.

Remarks Thursday, October 14, 1852

Begins with a gentle breeze at NE. Middle part, increases to a strong breeze. At sunset took in flying jib and main top gallant sail. Reefed at 2 AM. Double reefed at 7½ AM and unbent the main topsail for repairs. Saw one sail to the eastward. So, to the end of day.

Remarks Friday, October 15, 1852

Begins with a moderate gale at ENE. Close-reefed the topsails at 1 PM and furled the main sail. Some rain and thickened up. Middle part, moderates towards morning. At 1 AM wore to NE. Last part, quite moderate. Made sail at noon under single reefs, heading NE. Wind ESE. So ends this day.

Remarks Saturday, October 16, 1852

Begins with quite moderate and dry weather, but cloudy sky. Wind ESE. Ship heading NE. Middle part, wind light and bearing to the S, and a clear sky. Last part, fine light and clear and warm and pleasant. Employed cleaning bone. So ends this day. Latitude (by obs.) at noon 39° 11’ N Longitude (by chronometer) 172° 30’ W /45’ /172° 40’

Remarks Sunday, October 17, 1852

Begins with fine light wind and weather from S. Course ESE. Finished the main topsail yard at 6 PM. Middle part, wind light at S and a heavy damp air. Last part, ends with clear light weather with some haze. Latitude (by obs.) at noon 38° 24’ Longitude 170° 38’ W

Remarks Monday, October 18, 1852

Begins with light and clear weather, but air damp. Wind S. Course ESE by compass. Middle part, clear sky and a new moon with a six knot breeze at S by W. Last part, fine weather and a fresh breeze. Employed the crew at scraping bone. Latitude (by obs.) 37° 01’ Longitude 168° 40’ (by chronometer)

Remarks Tuesday, October 19, 1852

Begins with a fresh breeze at S by W, and hazy and damp air. Middle part, heavy rain. At 9½ the wind shifts suddenly to N and NNE. Last part, fresh breeze and fine clear weather and dry. Employed cleaning ship. Course ESE. So ends this day. Latitude (by obs.) 35° 16’ Longitude (by chronometer) 166° 16’ (by lunar) 166° 00’ 

Remarks Wednesday, October 20, 1852

Begins with a fine fresh breeze and clear weather. Middle part, wind cants to NE. Last part, fine weather. One ship to the south, steering eastward with us. Employed at sundry jobs in ship’s duty. Wind ENE. Latitude 33° 08’ Longitude 164° 04’

Remarks Thursday, October 21, 1852

Begins with good weather and a gentle whole sail breeze at ENE. Ship heading SE. Employed repairing boats, sails, rigging, etc. One ship to the S & E. Middle and last part, fine and light weather, wind bearing to ENE and E. Steered to the S & E. Employed cleaning bone and repairing the bow boat. So ends. Latitude 31° 20’ Longitude 162° 54’ W

Remarks Friday, October 22, 1852

Begins with a light breeze at ENE and clear and pleasant. No ships in sight. Middle part, the wind cants to ESE. At 12 o’clock tacked ship and headed NE. Last part, light and pleasant weather. Latitude (by obs.) 30° 20’ N Longitude 162° 18’ W

Remarks Saturday, October 23, 1852

Begins with pleasant weather and a light air from SE. Employed cleaning bone. Middle and last parts, much the same. The wind very unsteady and light. So ends these 24 hours. Latitude 31° 09’ (by obs.) Longitude 161° 25’ (by chronometer)

Remarks Sunday, October 24, 1852

Begins with light baffling easterly winds. Middle part, fresh breeze. Headed SSE,and at 12 tacked to NNE. At 2 AM furled the flying jib and main top gallant sail. Last part, more moderate wind veering to SE. Set the flying jib and main top gallant sail at 10 AM. So ends this day. Latitude 31° 35’ Longitude (by D.R.) 160° 20’ 

Remarks Monday, October 25, 1852

Begins with a moderate breeze at SE and lovely weather. Ship, by the wind, heading ENE. Middle part, the wind cants to SSE. Last part, light and pleasant weather. Got up the fore top gallant yard and sail. Employed drying bone. So ends this day. Latitude (by obs.) 31° 45’  Longitude 158° 25’

Remarks Tuesday, October 26, 1852

Begins with light air at SSW and fine weather. Middle part, the same. Steering SE from 2 PM to 2 AM. Very clear and pleasant. Last part, weather very fine. Saw a sail to the northward. Steering to the N & E. So ends this day. Employed drying bone. Latitude 30° 39’ Longitude 157° 52’ W 

Remarks Wednesday, October 27, 1852

Begins with fine light weather. Breeze very light at S & SW. Steered SE. Got the bow boat out. Middle part, light air and baffling to the southward. Last part, light and pleasant. A ship in sight to the N, steering eastward. So ends. Course SE by S. Latitude (by obs.) 29° 59’ Longitude 155° 56’ (by chronometer)

Remarks Thursday, October 28, 1852

Beginning, light air and calm. Clear and very warm and drying. Finished drying and stowing away the whale bone. Middle part, light air and calm. Course SSE. Last part, calm. Five ships in sight. So ends this day. Latitude (by obs.) 29° 32’  Longitude (by chronometer) 155° 20’

Remarks Friday, October 29, 1852

Begins with clear and calm weather and heavy swell from the westward. One ship bearing E by N 6 miles off, heading to the S & E. Middle part, light air from SSE. Kept by the wind to the eastward. Last part, spoke the ship L. C. Richmond of New Bedford, Capt. Cochrane, from the Arctic, 13 whales the season, bound to Hilo, Hawaii. Gammed all day. Breeze light at SSW. So ends. Latitude 29° 00’

Remarks Saturday, October 30, 1852

Begins with fine light wind and weather. Steering SE. Gamming with the Richmond until 8 PM. Middle part, breezes at S. Last part, light breeze. Three sail in sight. Made a tack to the S & W 3 hours. So ends this day. Latitude (by obs.) 28° 54’ Longitude 153° 32’

Remarks Sunday, October 31, 1852

Begins with light southerly wind and pleasant. Painted the boats on the house and the main mast. Steering to the S & E. Middle part, some squalls of rain. Last part, fresh breeze at SSE. Tacked ship at 7 AM. Two ships in sight. So ends this day. Latitude (by obs.) 27° 29’ Longitude 153° 00’ 

Remarks Monday, November 1, 1852

Begins with a moderate breeze at SSE and clear weather. Ship under double reefed topsails. Five ships in sight, with all sail out. Middle part, wind light with a heavy swell from W. Last, same to end. Latitude 27° 12’ Longitude 154° 22’ Employed repairing sails etc. Three ships in sight. Latitude 27° 08’ Longitude 154° 22’ 

Remarks Tuesday, November 2, 1852

Begins with a fresh breeze at SSE. Middle part, some light squalls with rain. Last part, wind cants to S. At 11½ tacked ship and headed to the E. Saw 2 sails. Moderate breeze. So ends this day. Latitude 26° 20'  Longitude 155° 53'  W

Remarks Wednesday, November 3, 1852

Begins with good weather and a moderate breeze from the S. Middle part, fresh breeze and squally. Tacked ship at 3¼ AM and headed SW. Last part, heads off to WSW. Tacked at 11 and headed ESE. Saw 3 ship at noon. Rain with a stiff squall from S & W. So ends this day. No observations.

Remarks Thursday, November 4, 1852

Begins with baffling southerly winds with squall and rain. Employed washing ship. Middle part, the wind shifts to WNW and strong with rain, the first fair wind for 14 days. Course S by E by compass. Last part, a moderate whole sail breeze. One ship in sight astern. Weather cloudy. So ends this day. Latitude (by obs.) 24° 12' Longitude 154° 56’

Remarks Friday, November 5, 1852

Begins with light westerly wind with clear and dry weather. Three sail in sight. Middle part, light air. Set the fore top gallant studding sail. Last part, light air. Saw a brig steering S. Fine weather. So ends this day. Course S. Latitude (by obs.) 22° 40’ Longitude 155° 06’

Remarks Saturday, November 6, 1852

Begins with light air. Steering S. Five sail in sight. Middle part, light air and calms. Course S by W. Last part, light. A ship passed near us which we called the Columbus of Fairhaven, steering S by W. Saw the land at 10 AM, bearing SW, distant by our observation 60 miles. So ends this day. Latitude (by obs.) 21° 37’ Longitude 155° 12' 

Remarks Sunday, November 7, 1852

Begins light airs and calms. The island of Maui or Mowe in sight. Course SW. Middle, calm Last part, steering SW. Wind very light and calm. Hawaii, Maui, and Molokai in sight, and 4 ships. So ends this day.

[Thus concludes the narrative entries of this journey. The General Williams returned to New London on Thursday, April 20, 1854. The trip yielded 73 bbls. sperm oil worth $3,427.00, 2936 bbls.whale oil worth $55,027.98, and 11,500 lbs. whale bones worth $4,485.00, for a total value of $62,939.98.]

[EXPENSE LEDGER]

Ship General Williams

Bought of Capt. Forsyth in June 1852

- one Box of tobacco 16 lbs - price not known

- do [ditto] one Box of segars 900 - price not known

Sold Watson one hat - $2.00

two pounds of tobacco 50¢/lb. - $1.00

ditto ditto ditto - $1.00

The Easy Readable Version of the Journal by Craig Showalter